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[bioontology-support] [BioPortal] Feedback from Christelle Gendrin

Jennifer Leigh Vendetti vendetti at stanford.edu
Thu Dec 10 17:51:22 PST 2015


Hi Christelle,


On Dec 9, 2015, at 1:55 AM, support at bioontology.org<mailto:support at bioontology.org> wrote:


Name: Christelle Gendrin

Email: christelle.gendrin at stfc.ac.uk<mailto:christelle.gendrin at stfc.ac.uk>

Location: https://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/NCIT?p=classes&conceptid=http%3A%2F%2Fncicb.nci.nih.gov%2Fxml%2Fowl%2FEVS%2FThesaurus.owl%23C42663&jump_to_nav=true

Feedback:

Hi there,

Thanks for the thesaurus, really helpful for me as I am developing an ontology for pharmaceutical development: https://github.com/ChristelleG/semantic-pharm-prod-develop/wiki

Just wondered, is it normal that the definition for "Binder Excipient" (C42647) is the same as for "Dispersing Excipient" (C42662)

I looked at both of these classes in the BioPortal application, and I do see that there are portions of the class definitions that are identical:

Binder Excipient:

An inactive ingredient of the solid pharmaceutical dosage form added to cement the active and inert components of tablets together to maintain cohesive and discrete portions. These are especially important in the production of time-release products. Binders provide the matrix from which the drug is gradually secreted.Binding agents which have adhesive properties are important excipients, especially for lozenges and tablets. The choice of the particular binder or thickening agent is dependent upon the desired properties of adhesive strength and thickness. Thus, one would be a better agent for a lozenge when slow dissolution in the mouth is desirable whereas another would provide more rapid disintegration for other purposes. The commonly used binder excipients in U.S.-manufactured drug products are microcrystalline cellulose and starch.

Dispersing Excipient:

An inactive ingredient of the solid pharmaceutical dosage form added to cement the active and inert components of tablets together to maintain cohesive and discrete portions. These are especially important in the production of time-release products. Binders provide the matrix from which the drug is gradually secreted. The commonly used binder excipients in U.S.-manufactured drug products are microcrystalline cellulose and starch.

I downloaded the NCIT ontology file and verified that the ontology sources match what is displayed in our application.  The data that we’re displaying in the web application seems correct and matches what’s in the ontology source file.  At this point, I would suggest contacting the ontology authors with your question regarding the similarities in the two definitions.  You can find contact information on the ontology summary page for NCIT:

http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/NCIT

Best,
Jennifer


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