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substrates

Peter D'Eustachio eustachi at cshl.edu
Tue Apr 24 04:39:46 PDT 2007


Hi Jen

Yes - that's how we use them. When we want to talk about the behavior of 
albumin, we would use a "binding" term.

Peter

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "J Clark" <jclark at ebi.ac.uk>
To: "Peter D'Eustachio" <deustp01 at med.nyu.edu>
Cc: <transport at genome.stanford.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2007 6:40 AM
Subject: Re: substrates


> Hi Peter,
>
> Thanks, I see what you mean. If I move these terms under the term 
> 'transmembrane transporter activity' would you be happy with that?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jen
>
> Peter D'Eustachio wrote:
>
>> Narrow answer: No.
>>
>> Broad, somewhat tangential answer: yes, maybe. Biologists certainly talk 
>> about serum albumin and cortisol binding globulin as "transporters" of 
>> the hydrophobic small molecules that bind to them in the blood and thus 
>> move from tissue to tissue, but this clearly amounts to overloading of 
>> the word "transport" as far as we are concerned.
>>
>> Peter D'Etc
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "J Clark" <jclark at ebi.ac.uk>
>> To: <transport at genome.stanford.edu>
>> Sent: Monday, April 23, 2007 10:44 AM
>> Subject: substrates
>>
>>
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> Can anybody think of any example of transport of the following
>>> substrates (belonging in the function ontology) that is not
>>> straightforward transport from one side of a membrane to another?
>>>
>>> organic acid transporter activity
>>> tricarboxylic acid transporter activity
>>> carbohydrate transporter activity
>>> alcohol transporter activity
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Jen
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
> -- 
> Gene Ontology Consortium
> EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute 




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