Dear Peter,<br><br>Thank you for contacting GO with your question.  The six different human WHSC1 results in AmiGO correspond to six different UniProtKB records that are all called WHSC1. If you click on each name, you will see that the links to UniProtKB are all different.<br>

<br>Four of them have this tag:<br><br>"The sequence shown here is derived from an Ensembl automatic analysis pipeline and should be considered as preliminary data. "<br><br><a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/D6R9V2">http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/D6R9V2</a><br>

<a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/D6RFE7">http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/D6RFE7</a><br><a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/D6RIS1">http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/D6RIS1</a><br><a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/H0Y9U6">http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/H0Y9U6</a><br>

<br>The remaining two differ in the length of the amino acid sequence.<br><br><a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/O96028">http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/O96028</a><br><a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A2A2T2">http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A2A2T2</a><br>

<br><br>Depending on your goals, you may want to focus on just one or several of these records.  This one, <a href="http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/O96028">http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/O96028</a>, is the longest amino acid sequence and appears to be the most extensive record.  If you use this UniProtKB identifier in your AmiGO search, you will only get one result.<br>

<br>Best wishes,<br><br><br clear="all">Tanya Berardini<br><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">---------- Forwarded message ----------<br>From: <a href="mailto:stensonpd@cardiff.ac.uk">stensonpd@cardiff.ac.uk</a><br>To: <a href="mailto:go-helpdesk@mailman.stanford.edu">go-helpdesk@mailman.stanford.edu</a><br>

Cc: <br>Date: Wed, 13 Jun 2012 02:50:49 -0700<br>Subject: GO Help query (from website)<br><br>
Email: <a href="mailto:stensonpd@cardiff.ac.uk">stensonpd@cardiff.ac.uk</a><br>
Name: Ontology (from Peter Stenson)<br>
Text: Hello<br>
I am having trouble uniquely identifying genes in the GO database (online and download).<br>
<br>
For example, the search for human WHSC1 (<a href="http://amigo.geneontology.org/cgi-bin/amigo/search.cgi?search_query=whsc1&search_constraint=gp&exact_match=1&session_id=5535amigo1339580308&action=new-search" target="_blank">http://amigo.geneontology.org/cgi-bin/amigo/search.cgi?search_query=whsc1&search_constraint=gp&exact_match=1&session_id=5535amigo1339580308&action=new-search</a>) brings up 6 results, all of which seem to be pointing to the same gene. Can you explain why there are 6 entries here, rather than just 1? Many thanks.<br>


<br></div><br>