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[liberationtech] CFP: Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions and the Role of Communication Technologies

Yosem Companys companys at stanford.edu
Tue Feb 1 16:40:27 PST 2011


fyi


..............................................................................................................................
>
>   *OPEN CALL FOR ARTICLES ON:
>
> *“Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions and the Role of Communication
> Technologies”
>
> An International Journal of Communication (IJoC) Special Features Section
> on
> the recent Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions in North Africa to be
> published
> in 2011.
>
> Submission Deadline: March 15, 2011
>
> Guest Editors:  Johanne Kuebler and Ilhem Allagui
>
> The International Journal of Communication is accepting papers for its
> Features Section about the Tunisian and the Egyptian protests and their
> sequels in the Arab region.
>
> Despite numerous efforts by Arab leaders to limit Internet access and to
> censor all media—especially new media—the spread of satellite TV and the
> Internet have transformed the media landscape in the Arab and Muslim
> worlds.
> Revolutionary protests by Tunisians led to the ousting of President Zine El
> Abidine Ben Ali, who maintained strict media censorship after 23 years in
> power. Similarly, just weeks after the Tunisian uprising, demonstrations
> and
> riots have left the rule of the Hosni Mubarak government in a quandary. The
> oppression of  free speech and democratic political participation have
> galvanized both Tunisians and Egyptians into unprecedented acts of revolt,
> demonstrating perseverance toward the goal of real political change.
>
> Some observers attribute the success of the Tunisian revolution to the use
> of new media and social networking sites. While the penetration rate of
> Facebook in Tunisia is barely 19% (according to Socialbakers, the Facebook
> statistical portal), YouTube and DailyMotion were banned until January 13,
> 2011 despite Ben Ali’s desperate attempts to calm the population by
> promising unblocked access to Internet Web sites.  Ben Ali eventually fled
> Tunisia on January 14.
>
> As of this writing, the outcome of the Egyptian uprisings remains to be
> seen, and the potential for similar uprisings throughout the Arab world is
> very much in evidence.
>
> This Features Section of the IJoC invites discussions about these events
> occurring in the North African region in relation to communication
> technologies. By addressing these events, we aim to have a better
> understanding of the role of communication technologies as instruments for
> social change.
>
> The submissions, empirical or theoretical, can be short observations,
> analyses or opinions of 1,500–5,000 words. Papers should follow the APA
> style (5th Ed.). Submissions will be peer reviewed.
>
> Please send submissions to: Ilhem Allagui at iallagui at aus.edu by March 15.
>
> We look forward to your articles for this Special Features Section.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Manuel Castells and Larry Gross
> IJoC Editors
> ________________________________________________________________________
> International Journal of Communication
> USC Annenberg Press
> http://ijoc.org/
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ...............................................................................................................................
>
>
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