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[liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in repressive environments (Katrin Verclas) liberationtech Digest, Vol 48, Issue 2

Juliana Rotich juliana at ushahidi.com
Thu Feb 10 09:20:03 PST 2011


Re: The security and ethics of mapping in repressive  environments
     (Katrin Verclas)
Regarding the Ushahidi plugin you mention, It is true that there is no such
thing as anonymous SMS. What it’s doing is making phone numbers in our
database anonymous. What we could call it is the SMS Phone Number Scrambler
For The Back End Of Ushahidi.
 Our devs made that very quickly at the request of one of the deployers.
I have added some more description with specifics of what the plugin does
NOT do.
http://apps.ushahidi.com/p/sms-anonymizer/page/Anonymizer/
More importantly, we welcome your assistance. You can create an account and
participate in the documentation/testing of the various plugins we have on
http://apps.ushahidi.com/
Email me if you have specific feedback about any other plugins you see on
there.
As an open source community, we also welcome participation to make things
better. Happy to add you to our skype channel/IRC for dev chats/deployer
chats where you can make recommendations directly (In addition to adding
links/resources you feel would be useful) Let me know.
Best,
Juliana
(juliana at ushahidi.com)

On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 9:18 PM,
<liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu>wrote:

> Send liberationtech mailing list submissions to
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> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of liberationtech digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Re: Wael Ghonim interview (Jillian C. York)
>   2. Re: Wael Ghonim interview (Rebecca MacKinnon)
>   3. Re: Wael Ghonim interview (Jillian C. York)
>   4. Re: Mubarak thugs move from streets to the Internet
>      (Katherine Maher)
>   5. Fwd: Designing a useful and robust social collaboration tool
>      (alex)
>   6. Yale ISP Seeking Law & Media Program Director (Yosem Companys)
>   7. The security and ethics of mapping in repressive  environments
>      (Katrin Verclas)
>   8. Re: pgp message encryption and decrypion using just a browser
>      (David Dahl)
>   9. Re: The security and ethics of mapping in repressive
>      environments (Jacob Appelbaum)
>  10. Re: pgp message encryption and decrypion using just a browser
>      (Jacob Appelbaum)
>  11. Re: The security and ethics of mapping in repressive
>      environments (katmagic)
>  12. Re: The security and ethics of mapping in repressive
>      environments (Jacob Appelbaum)
>  13. iran 14 Feb protest facebook (25 bahman) (25 Bahman)
>  14. Re: The security and ethics of mapping in repressive
>      environments (Danny O'Brien)
>  15. Anchor Free (Yosem Companys)
>  16. Re: pgp message encryption and decrypion using just a browser
>      (David Dahl)
>  17. Re: The security and ethics of mapping in repressive
>      environments (Moxie Marlinspike)
>  18. Re: The security and ethics of mapping in repressive
>      environments (Jacob Appelbaum)
>  19. Re: Anchor Free (Hal Roberts)
>  20. Fwd: [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar
>      Series- Feb 10, 2011 (Yosem Companys)
>  21. Could someone confirm if they receive this via the        list?
>      (Yosem Companys)
>  22. Re: Fwd: [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar
>      Series- Feb 10, 2011 (Kevin Donovan)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 08:52:47 -0500
> From: "Jillian C. York" <jilliancyork at gmail.com>
> To: Steven Clift <clift at e-democracy.org>
> Cc: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Wael Ghonim interview
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTimBBXP5a=1kR5Zv-QWjPYpdiqj6ZiVCn-NQqMqS at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> I've been tracking instances of this in the Middle East and North Africa as
> well as a few from China and Hong Kong passed on by a
> contact similarly concerned.  It's unfortunately fairly common amongst
> activists, and here's why: Facebook has made clear that anyone, including
> celebrities (they used Lady Gaga as an example) must use their legal name
> on
> the platform.  For ordinary folks, there's no reason to worry.  Activists,
> on the other hand, are likely to have opponents.
>
> The problem there is that, when a Facebook user is reported for using a
> false name (anyone can report another user), the incident is sent into a
> queue to be reviewed by FB staff.  Staff then (this is according to
> Facebook) review the account and determine whether to follow up.  In cases
> where the name *looks* real, they may ignore the complaint.  Sometimes they
> do, sometimes they don't; if they choose to proceed, they will often
> deactivate the user's account, or ask for government identification.
>
> I've tracked about 50 instances of the latter, mostly in MENA (though
> that's
> my area of focus, so I wouldn't say it's representative of any sort of
> bias), but some in the US as well.
>
> Thus, I wouldn't say there's a pattern in authoritarian states, but rather,
> there's a pattern with activists, who are targeted by their opponents.
>
> I published this last September on the subject:
> http://opennet.net/policing-content-quasi-public-sphere; there's a section
> dedicated to Facebook alone.
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 8:45 AM, Steven Clift <clift at e-democracy.org>
> wrote:
>
> > So, how actively does Facebook enforce its real identity requirement in
> > authoritarian states?
> >
> > How do they do this and how does enforcement compare with the U.S. for
> > example?
> >
> > When I met with Somali NGOs in Kenya, it was stated that just about every
> > active Somali on Facebook uses an alternative identity to be safer as
> well
> > as to be listen to for what they are saying instead of being dismissed
> for
> > being from x or y clan or organization.
> >
> > Steven Clift
> >  On Feb 8, 2011 7:34 AM, "Jillian C. York" <jilliancyork at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> > > I think it's worth pointing out a small inaccuracy in this piece:
> Ghonim
> > was
> > > one of many of the FB page's admins, is not the current admin, and did
> > not
> > > create the page originally.
> > >
> > > I say this not to diminish his work or the manner in which Egyptians
> view
> > > him now (lots of tweets yesterday calling him a hero), but to point out
> > that
> > > he did not take credit for that, rather Hounshell attributed it to him.
> > > Lots of others were involved in the creation and maintenance of that
> > page,
> > > many of whom have chosen to remain anonymous (and have thus suffered
> > > Facebook's wrath again and again; recall the page going down in
> December
> > for
> > > that very reason).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 12:14 AM, elham gheytanchi <
> elhamucla at hotmail.com
> > >wrote:
> > >
> > >> just read this about him:
> > >>
> > >> A New Leader For Egypt's Protesters? - By Blake Hounshell
> > >>
> > >> CAIRO ? Twelve days ago, Wael Ghonim posted a chilling message on his
> > >> Twitter account. "Pray for #Egypt," he wrote. "Very worried as it
> seems
> > >> that government is planning a war crime tomorrow against people. We
> are
> > >> all ready to die."
> > >>
> > >> And then he disappeared.
> > >>
> > >> One day later, a huge, angry crowd -- choking on tear gas and braving
> > fire
> > >> hoses, rubber bullets, and live ammunition -- overwhelmed thousands of
> > >> black-helmeted riot police and surged into Cairo's central Tahrir
> > Square,
> > >> setting the stage for a standoff between protesters and President
> Hosni
> > >> Mubarak that is well into its second week.
> > >>
> > >> Ghonim, a Dubai-based Google executive who hadn't been seen or heard
> > from
> > >> since Jan. 27, was freed on Monday, Feb. 7, after an international
> > >> campaign for his release. "Freedom is a bless that deserves fighting
> for
> > >> it," he tweeted shortly after 8 p.m., Cairo time.
> > >>
> > >> Ghonim appeared Monday evening on Dream 2, a private channel owned by
> > >> Egyptian tycoon Naguib Sawiris, and gave a devastating, emotional
> > >> interview that cut deeply into the image the Mubarak regime has been
> > >> trying to paint of the protesters.
> > >>
> > >> Looking deeply shaken, his eyes haunted and voice breaking, Ghonim
> > >> insisted, "This was a revolution of the youth of all of Egypt. I'm not
> a
> > >> hero."
> > >>
> > >> Gaining strength throughout the interview, Ghonim said he wasn't
> > tortured,
> > >> but was kidnapped by four armed men, blindfolded, and questioned
> > >> relentlessly about how the protesters pulled off the uprising (they
> "had
> > >> no idea," he said). But later, when the host showed photographs of
> young
> > >> Egyptians who have lost their lives over the last few weeks, Ghonim
> wept
> > >> openly and then walked away, saying they died "because of those who
> > cling
> > >> to power."
> > >>
> > >> Many people here had speculated that Ghonim was the administrator of
> the
> > >> "We Are All Khaled Said" Facebook page, set up to commemorate a
> > >> 28-year-old youth who was brutally beaten to death on June 6, 2010, by
> > >> police at an Internet cafe in Alexandria. It was the page's call for
> > >> nationwide demonstrations across Egypt -- along with the spark
> provided
> > by
> > >> nearby Tunisia -- that lit the flame of revolution, activists say.
> What
> > >> was so effective about the Jan. 25 protest was that "it was a clear
> call
> > >> to action," said Nasser Weddady, civil rights outreach director for
> the
> > >> American Islamic Congress in Boston. "Everybody wants to stop
> torture."
> > >>
> > >> In the interview, Ghonim admitted for the first time that he was
> indeed
> > >> the voice behind the page -- though he said repeatedly that it was
> > others
> > >> "on the ground" who made it all happen. "I have been away for 12
> days."
> > >>
> > >> Ironically, by kidnapping, detaining, and then releasing Ghonim --
> > >> instantly turning him into a nationwide celebrity -- the regime may
> have
> > >> just created an undisputed leader for a movement that in recent days
> has
> > >> struggled to find its footing, seemingly outfoxed by a government
> > skilled
> > >> in the dark arts of quashing and marginalizing dissent. Within minutes
> > of
> > >> his interview, his personal Facebook page had surged in popularity,
> and
> > >> the tweets were coming so fast that #Ghonim briefly became a trending
> > >> topic on Twitter.
> > >>
> > >> Ghonim's reappearance comes at a critical time for the protesters. Now
> > >> that the galvanizing moment has passed, it's not clear where their
> > >> movement goes from here. It's one thing to build a coalition against
> > >> police brutality, something Egyptians of all classes have suffered
> from
> > >> for decades; it's quite another to rally people around more complex
> > >> demands, such as constitutional reform or media oversight. And after a
> > >> week of nonstop propaganda on state television against the protesters
> --
> > >> painted simultaneously as dangerous Islamists and Israeli agents --
> it's
> > >> not even clear that an overwhelming majority of Egyptians want Mubarak
> > out
> > >> immediately, as the folks in Tahrir insist.
> > >>
> > >> For the protest movement, decentralization is at once the source of
> its
> > >> power and its potential Achilles' heel.
> > >>
> > >> The organization that administers the square itself, it's important to
> > >> understand, is a completely separate entity from the various other
> > >> Facebook groups, political parties, and other movements that often get
> > (or
> > >> take) credit for the uprising. Ahmed Naguib, 33, a member of the
> > >> 1,000-plus strong Tahrir organizing committee, told me that few of the
> > >> volunteers who man the barricades, seek to root out regime
> infiltrators,
> > >> staff the increasingly well-stocked field hospitals and pharmacies,
> and
> > >> bring in supplies are "political" types -- as is the case with the
> > roughly
> > >> 100-member steering committee that more or less makes key logistical
> > >> decisions. Many if not most of these people didn't even know each
> other
> > >> before last week -- and they aren't necessarily activists. The ad hoc
> > >> organizers have resisted efforts by some groups to secure
> > representational
> > >> seating in the inner circle of the steering committee, Naguib told me.
> > >>
> > >> It's true that some of the youth groups are in communication with the
> > >> "Wise Men" -- the self-appointed council of elders that has offered
> > itself
> > >> up as a go-between with the regime -- but others complain that they
> have
> > >> little visibility on those discussions and distrust an initiative that
> > >> smacks of selling out those who gave their lives taking and defending
> > the
> > >> square. But the youth groups don't necessarily represent the
> > unaffiliated
> > >> masses in the square, either. Nobody I've spoken with, moreover,
> > >> recognized the handful of "January 25 youth" who met briefly with Vice
> > >> President Omar Suleiman on Saturday, nor the "Coalition of Angry
> Youth"
> > >> who gave a news conference on Sunday, to give their view of the
> > >> negotiations.
> > >>
> > >> Meanwhile, splits are emerging even within groups. Over the weekend,
> > when
> > >> the Army began moving its tanks further into the square in a bid to
> push
> > >> the protesters south of the Egyptian Museum, dozens of young members
> of
> > >> the Muslim Brotherhood rushed to lie in front of the tracks -- over
> the
> > >> objections of a senior Brotherhood official. At a news conference on
> > >> Sunday, senior leaders of the Islamist movement stressed repeatedly
> that
> > >> they had "no special agenda," a clear attempt to head off criticism of
> > >> their decision to negotiate with the regime.
> > >>
> > >> Inside Tahrir, different groups are gradually staking out separate
> > >> geographic areas, with the Muslim Brotherhood dominating the megaphone
> > at
> > >> the southern end of the square, while the socialists have assembled an
> > >> entire speaker system a few dozen yards west, and various smaller
> groups
> > >> are sprinkled elsewhere.
> > >>
> > >> "Everybody here is organizing," said political analyst Hisham Kassem,
> > "but
> > >> there's nobody to negotiate with. We have no control over the square,
> > and
> > >> they don't either."
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> ------------------------------
> > >> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2011 20:14:55 -0800
> > >> From: marycjoyce at gmail.com
> > >> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> > >> Subject: [liberationtech] Wael Ghonim interview
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> This interview with Wael Ghonim is absolutely critical to those hoping
> > to
> > >> understand the digital aspect of the protests in Egypt. Wael is the
> > >> formerly imprisoned admin of the "We are all Khaled Said" Facebook
> group
> > >> (also a Google employee) who is an influential figure in the democracy
> > >> movement.
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> >
> http://egypt.alive.in/2011/02/08/dream-tv-interview-with-wael-ghonim-part-2-with-english-subtitles/
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >> MARY C. JOYCE
> > >> Founder | The Meta-Activism Project | www.Meta-Activism.org<
> > http://www.meta-activism.org/>
> > >> Digital Activism Consultant | www.MaryJoyce.com<
> > http://www.maryjoyce.com/>
> >
> > >> Mobile | +1.857.928.1297
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> _______________________________________________ liberationtech mailing
> > list
> > >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu Should you need to change your
> > >> subscription options, please go to:
> > >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech If you
> > would
> > >> like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click above)
> next
> > to
> > >> "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily digest?" You
> > will
> > >> need the user name and password you receive from the list moderator in
> > >> monthly reminders. Should you need immediate assistance, please
> contact
> > the
> > >> list moderator. Please don't forget to follow us on
> > >> http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> > >>
> > >> _______________________________________________
> > >> liberationtech mailing list
> > >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> > >>
> > >> Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> > >>
> > >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> > >>
> > >> If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you
> click
> > >> above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily
> > >> digest?"
> > >>
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> > >> moderator in monthly reminders.
> > >>
> > >> Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list
> moderator.
> > >>
> > >> Please don't forget to follow us on
> > http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Berkman Center for Internet and Society |
> > > https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jyork
> > > jilliancyork.com | @jilliancyork | tel: +1-857-891-4244
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Berkman Center for Internet and Society |
> https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jyork
> jilliancyork.com | @jilliancyork | tel: +1-857-891-4244
> -------------- next part --------------
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 09:23:57 -0500
> From: Rebecca MacKinnon <rebecca.mackinnon at gmail.com>
> To: "Jillian C. York" <jilliancyork at gmail.com>
> Cc: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Wael Ghonim interview
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTim6ge4qDsNeZxRuHz3pt1C0qAGO=5qO2Z3edxvs at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
> As a footnote to this, Michael Anti, a famous Chinese blogger and former
> Berkman fellow, has had his account deactivated for not using his real
> name.
> (He never uses his real name in any of his professional capacities, online
> or off.) He appealed, and they said that while he's welcome to use the
> "alternative name" field so that people can see both his nom de plume and
> his real name, they cannot allow him to use "Michael Anti" as his sole
> identity on FB. He has objected to this strenuously, arguing that such a
> policy is very bad for activists in China and elsewhere.
>
> Chinese bloggers are of course speculating that FB's stepped-up real name
> policy enforcement has to do with FB's interest in entering the Chinese
> market. I have no way of knowing whether this is true.
>
> The moral of the story is this: Anybody using FB for activism should be
> sure
> to make regular (even daily) backups of all their content and contacts. If
> you're disabled for using a false name and you did in fact use a false
> name,
> you've got no rights under the terms of service. If you're disabled by
> mistake, a successful appeal is not guaranteed.
>
> In the medium term, activists who rely heavily on FB should be sure to have
> blogs and other online vehicles independent of FB that are more supportive
> of security and anonymity, and get in the habit of cross-posting to them -
> linking to them frequently in their FB pages, and making sure their core
> target communities know about these alternative online "home bases."
>
> In the longer term activists may want to think about working actively on
> building critical mass and momentum for successful activism in other parts
> of the Internet that are more friendly to anonymous and pseudonymous
> dissent
> - and supporting companies that are more activist-friendly.
>
> Best,
> Rebecca
>
>
>
> Rebecca
>
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 8:52 AM, Jillian C. York <jilliancyork at gmail.com
> >wrote:
>
> > I've been tracking instances of this in the Middle East and North Africa
> as
> > well as a few from China and Hong Kong passed on by a
> > contact similarly concerned.  It's unfortunately fairly common amongst
> > activists, and here's why: Facebook has made clear that anyone, including
> > celebrities (they used Lady Gaga as an example) must use their legal name
> on
> > the platform.  For ordinary folks, there's no reason to worry.
>  Activists,
> > on the other hand, are likely to have opponents.
> >
> > The problem there is that, when a Facebook user is reported for using a
> > false name (anyone can report another user), the incident is sent into a
> > queue to be reviewed by FB staff.  Staff then (this is according to
> > Facebook) review the account and determine whether to follow up.  In
> cases
> > where the name *looks* real, they may ignore the complaint.  Sometimes
> > they do, sometimes they don't; if they choose to proceed, they will often
> > deactivate the user's account, or ask for government identification.
> >
> > I've tracked about 50 instances of the latter, mostly in MENA (though
> > that's my area of focus, so I wouldn't say it's representative of any
> sort
> > of bias), but some in the US as well.
> >
> > Thus, I wouldn't say there's a pattern in authoritarian states, but
> rather,
> > there's a pattern with activists, who are targeted by their opponents.
> >
> > I published this last September on the subject:
> > http://opennet.net/policing-content-quasi-public-sphere; there's a
> section
> > dedicated to Facebook alone.
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 8:45 AM, Steven Clift <clift at e-democracy.org
> >wrote:
> >
> >> So, how actively does Facebook enforce its real identity requirement in
> >> authoritarian states?
> >>
> >> How do they do this and how does enforcement compare with the U.S. for
> >> example?
> >>
> >> When I met with Somali NGOs in Kenya, it was stated that just about
> every
> >> active Somali on Facebook uses an alternative identity to be safer as
> well
> >> as to be listen to for what they are saying instead of being dismissed
> for
> >> being from x or y clan or organization.
> >>
> >> Steven Clift
> >>  On Feb 8, 2011 7:34 AM, "Jillian C. York" <jilliancyork at gmail.com>
> >> wrote:
> >> > I think it's worth pointing out a small inaccuracy in this piece:
> Ghonim
> >> was
> >> > one of many of the FB page's admins, is not the current admin, and did
> >> not
> >> > create the page originally.
> >> >
> >> > I say this not to diminish his work or the manner in which Egyptians
> >> view
> >> > him now (lots of tweets yesterday calling him a hero), but to point
> out
> >> that
> >> > he did not take credit for that, rather Hounshell attributed it to
> him.
> >> > Lots of others were involved in the creation and maintenance of that
> >> page,
> >> > many of whom have chosen to remain anonymous (and have thus suffered
> >> > Facebook's wrath again and again; recall the page going down in
> December
> >> for
> >> > that very reason).
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 12:14 AM, elham gheytanchi <
> >> elhamucla at hotmail.com>wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> just read this about him:
> >> >>
> >> >> A New Leader For Egypt's Protesters? - By Blake Hounshell
> >> >>
> >> >> CAIRO ? Twelve days ago, Wael Ghonim posted a chilling message on his
> >> >> Twitter account. "Pray for #Egypt," he wrote. "Very worried as it
> seems
> >> >> that government is planning a war crime tomorrow against people. We
> are
> >> >> all ready to die."
> >> >>
> >> >> And then he disappeared.
> >> >>
> >> >> One day later, a huge, angry crowd -- choking on tear gas and braving
> >> fire
> >> >> hoses, rubber bullets, and live ammunition -- overwhelmed thousands
> of
> >> >> black-helmeted riot police and surged into Cairo's central Tahrir
> >> Square,
> >> >> setting the stage for a standoff between protesters and President
> Hosni
> >> >> Mubarak that is well into its second week.
> >> >>
> >> >> Ghonim, a Dubai-based Google executive who hadn't been seen or heard
> >> from
> >> >> since Jan. 27, was freed on Monday, Feb. 7, after an international
> >> >> campaign for his release. "Freedom is a bless that deserves fighting
> >> for
> >> >> it," he tweeted shortly after 8 p.m., Cairo time.
> >> >>
> >> >> Ghonim appeared Monday evening on Dream 2, a private channel owned by
> >> >> Egyptian tycoon Naguib Sawiris, and gave a devastating, emotional
> >> >> interview that cut deeply into the image the Mubarak regime has been
> >> >> trying to paint of the protesters.
> >> >>
> >> >> Looking deeply shaken, his eyes haunted and voice breaking, Ghonim
> >> >> insisted, "This was a revolution of the youth of all of Egypt. I'm
> not
> >> a
> >> >> hero."
> >> >>
> >> >> Gaining strength throughout the interview, Ghonim said he wasn't
> >> tortured,
> >> >> but was kidnapped by four armed men, blindfolded, and questioned
> >> >> relentlessly about how the protesters pulled off the uprising (they
> >> "had
> >> >> no idea," he said). But later, when the host showed photographs of
> >> young
> >> >> Egyptians who have lost their lives over the last few weeks, Ghonim
> >> wept
> >> >> openly and then walked away, saying they died "because of those who
> >> cling
> >> >> to power."
> >> >>
> >> >> Many people here had speculated that Ghonim was the administrator of
> >> the
> >> >> "We Are All Khaled Said" Facebook page, set up to commemorate a
> >> >> 28-year-old youth who was brutally beaten to death on June 6, 2010,
> by
> >> >> police at an Internet cafe in Alexandria. It was the page's call for
> >> >> nationwide demonstrations across Egypt -- along with the spark
> provided
> >> by
> >> >> nearby Tunisia -- that lit the flame of revolution, activists say.
> What
> >> >> was so effective about the Jan. 25 protest was that "it was a clear
> >> call
> >> >> to action," said Nasser Weddady, civil rights outreach director for
> the
> >> >> American Islamic Congress in Boston. "Everybody wants to stop
> torture."
> >> >>
> >> >> In the interview, Ghonim admitted for the first time that he was
> indeed
> >> >> the voice behind the page -- though he said repeatedly that it was
> >> others
> >> >> "on the ground" who made it all happen. "I have been away for 12
> days."
> >> >>
> >> >> Ironically, by kidnapping, detaining, and then releasing Ghonim --
> >> >> instantly turning him into a nationwide celebrity -- the regime may
> >> have
> >> >> just created an undisputed leader for a movement that in recent days
> >> has
> >> >> struggled to find its footing, seemingly outfoxed by a government
> >> skilled
> >> >> in the dark arts of quashing and marginalizing dissent. Within
> minutes
> >> of
> >> >> his interview, his personal Facebook page had surged in popularity,
> and
> >> >> the tweets were coming so fast that #Ghonim briefly became a trending
> >> >> topic on Twitter.
> >> >>
> >> >> Ghonim's reappearance comes at a critical time for the protesters.
> Now
> >> >> that the galvanizing moment has passed, it's not clear where their
> >> >> movement goes from here. It's one thing to build a coalition against
> >> >> police brutality, something Egyptians of all classes have suffered
> from
> >> >> for decades; it's quite another to rally people around more complex
> >> >> demands, such as constitutional reform or media oversight. And after
> a
> >> >> week of nonstop propaganda on state television against the protesters
> >> --
> >> >> painted simultaneously as dangerous Islamists and Israeli agents --
> >> it's
> >> >> not even clear that an overwhelming majority of Egyptians want
> Mubarak
> >> out
> >> >> immediately, as the folks in Tahrir insist.
> >> >>
> >> >> For the protest movement, decentralization is at once the source of
> its
> >> >> power and its potential Achilles' heel.
> >> >>
> >> >> The organization that administers the square itself, it's important
> to
> >> >> understand, is a completely separate entity from the various other
> >> >> Facebook groups, political parties, and other movements that often
> get
> >> (or
> >> >> take) credit for the uprising. Ahmed Naguib, 33, a member of the
> >> >> 1,000-plus strong Tahrir organizing committee, told me that few of
> the
> >> >> volunteers who man the barricades, seek to root out regime
> >> infiltrators,
> >> >> staff the increasingly well-stocked field hospitals and pharmacies,
> and
> >> >> bring in supplies are "political" types -- as is the case with the
> >> roughly
> >> >> 100-member steering committee that more or less makes key logistical
> >> >> decisions. Many if not most of these people didn't even know each
> other
> >> >> before last week -- and they aren't necessarily activists. The ad hoc
> >> >> organizers have resisted efforts by some groups to secure
> >> representational
> >> >> seating in the inner circle of the steering committee, Naguib told
> me.
> >> >>
> >> >> It's true that some of the youth groups are in communication with the
> >> >> "Wise Men" -- the self-appointed council of elders that has offered
> >> itself
> >> >> up as a go-between with the regime -- but others complain that they
> >> have
> >> >> little visibility on those discussions and distrust an initiative
> that
> >> >> smacks of selling out those who gave their lives taking and defending
> >> the
> >> >> square. But the youth groups don't necessarily represent the
> >> unaffiliated
> >> >> masses in the square, either. Nobody I've spoken with, moreover,
> >> >> recognized the handful of "January 25 youth" who met briefly with
> Vice
> >> >> President Omar Suleiman on Saturday, nor the "Coalition of Angry
> Youth"
> >> >> who gave a news conference on Sunday, to give their view of the
> >> >> negotiations.
> >> >>
> >> >> Meanwhile, splits are emerging even within groups. Over the weekend,
> >> when
> >> >> the Army began moving its tanks further into the square in a bid to
> >> push
> >> >> the protesters south of the Egyptian Museum, dozens of young members
> of
> >> >> the Muslim Brotherhood rushed to lie in front of the tracks -- over
> the
> >> >> objections of a senior Brotherhood official. At a news conference on
> >> >> Sunday, senior leaders of the Islamist movement stressed repeatedly
> >> that
> >> >> they had "no special agenda," a clear attempt to head off criticism
> of
> >> >> their decision to negotiate with the regime.
> >> >>
> >> >> Inside Tahrir, different groups are gradually staking out separate
> >> >> geographic areas, with the Muslim Brotherhood dominating the
> megaphone
> >> at
> >> >> the southern end of the square, while the socialists have assembled
> an
> >> >> entire speaker system a few dozen yards west, and various smaller
> >> groups
> >> >> are sprinkled elsewhere.
> >> >>
> >> >> "Everybody here is organizing," said political analyst Hisham Kassem,
> >> "but
> >> >> there's nobody to negotiate with. We have no control over the square,
> >> and
> >> >> they don't either."
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> ------------------------------
> >> >> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2011 20:14:55 -0800
> >> >> From: marycjoyce at gmail.com
> >> >> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >> >> Subject: [liberationtech] Wael Ghonim interview
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> This interview with Wael Ghonim is absolutely critical to those
> hoping
> >> to
> >> >> understand the digital aspect of the protests in Egypt. Wael is the
> >> >> formerly imprisoned admin of the "We are all Khaled Said" Facebook
> >> group
> >> >> (also a Google employee) who is an influential figure in the
> democracy
> >> >> movement.
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> http://egypt.alive.in/2011/02/08/dream-tv-interview-with-wael-ghonim-part-2-with-english-subtitles/
> >> >>
> >> >> --
> >> >> MARY C. JOYCE
> >> >> Founder | The Meta-Activism Project | www.Meta-Activism.org<
> >> http://www.meta-activism.org/>
> >> >> Digital Activism Consultant | www.MaryJoyce.com<
> >> http://www.maryjoyce.com/>
> >>
> >> >> Mobile | +1.857.928.1297
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> _______________________________________________ liberationtech
> mailing
> >> list
> >> >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu Should you need to change your
> >> >> subscription options, please go to:
> >> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech If you
> >> would
> >> >> like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click above)
> next
> >> to
> >> >> "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily digest?" You
> >> will
> >> >> need the user name and password you receive from the list moderator
> in
> >> >> monthly reminders. Should you need immediate assistance, please
> contact
> >> the
> >> >> list moderator. Please don't forget to follow us on
> >> >> http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >> >>
> >> >> _______________________________________________
> >> >> liberationtech mailing list
> >> >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >> >>
> >> >> Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >> >>
> >> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >> >>
> >> >> If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you
> >> click
> >> >> above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a
> daily
> >> >> digest?"
> >> >>
> >> >> You will need the user name and password you receive from the list
> >> >> moderator in monthly reminders.
> >> >>
> >> >> Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list
> >> moderator.
> >> >>
> >> >> Please don't forget to follow us on
> >> http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > Berkman Center for Internet and Society |
> >> > https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jyork
> >> > jilliancyork.com | @jilliancyork | tel: +1-857-891-4244
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Berkman Center for Internet and Society |
> > https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jyork
> > jilliancyork.com | @jilliancyork | tel: +1-857-891-4244
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > liberationtech mailing list
> > liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >
> > Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click
> > above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily
> > digest?"
> >
> > You will need the user name and password you receive from the list
> > moderator in monthly reminders.
> >
> > Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list moderator.
> >
> > Please don't forget to follow us on http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Rebecca MacKinnon
> Schwartz Senior Fellow, New America Foundation
> Co-founder, GlobalVoicesOnline.org
> Cell: +1-617-939-3493
> E-mail: rebecca.mackinnon at gmail.com
> Blog: RConversation.blogs.com
> Twitter: @rmack <http://twitter.com/rmack>
> Facebook: facebook.com/rmackinnon
> -------------- next part --------------
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> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/private/liberationtech/attachments/20110208/81cd9040/attachment-0001.htm
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 09:42:36 -0500
> From: "Jillian C. York" <jilliancyork at gmail.com>
> To: Rebecca MacKinnon <rebecca.mackinnon at gmail.com>
> Cc: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Wael Ghonim interview
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTimYq6bzuhR0yXNTQtyJGZNexpRZn6SE=-qdteUP at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> And just in time, here's a piece from the Register on how FB's policy
> doesn't work for activists:
>
> http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/02/08/faceboo_real_names/
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 9:23 AM, Rebecca MacKinnon <
> rebecca.mackinnon at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > As a footnote to this, Michael Anti, a famous Chinese blogger and former
> > Berkman fellow, has had his account deactivated for not using his real
> name.
> > (He never uses his real name in any of his professional capacities,
> online
> > or off.) He appealed, and they said that while he's welcome to use the
> > "alternative name" field so that people can see both his nom de plume and
> > his real name, they cannot allow him to use "Michael Anti" as his sole
> > identity on FB. He has objected to this strenuously, arguing that such a
> > policy is very bad for activists in China and elsewhere.
> >
> > Chinese bloggers are of course speculating that FB's stepped-up real name
> > policy enforcement has to do with FB's interest in entering the Chinese
> > market. I have no way of knowing whether this is true.
> >
> > The moral of the story is this: Anybody using FB for activism should be
> > sure to make regular (even daily) backups of all their content and
> contacts.
> > If you're disabled for using a false name and you did in fact use a false
> > name, you've got no rights under the terms of service. If you're disabled
> by
> > mistake, a successful appeal is not guaranteed.
> >
> > In the medium term, activists who rely heavily on FB should be sure to
> have
> > blogs and other online vehicles independent of FB that are more
> supportive
> > of security and anonymity, and get in the habit of cross-posting to them
> -
> > linking to them frequently in their FB pages, and making sure their core
> > target communities know about these alternative online "home bases."
> >
> > In the longer term activists may want to think about working actively on
> > building critical mass and momentum for successful activism in other
> parts
> > of the Internet that are more friendly to anonymous and pseudonymous
> dissent
> > - and supporting companies that are more activist-friendly.
> >
> > Best,
> > Rebecca
> >
> >
> >
> > Rebecca
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 8:52 AM, Jillian C. York <jilliancyork at gmail.com
> >wrote:
> >
> >> I've been tracking instances of this in the Middle East and North Africa
> >> as well as a few from China and Hong Kong passed on by a
> >> contact similarly concerned.  It's unfortunately fairly common amongst
> >> activists, and here's why: Facebook has made clear that anyone,
> including
> >> celebrities (they used Lady Gaga as an example) must use their legal
> name on
> >> the platform.  For ordinary folks, there's no reason to worry.
>  Activists,
> >> on the other hand, are likely to have opponents.
> >>
> >> The problem there is that, when a Facebook user is reported for using a
> >> false name (anyone can report another user), the incident is sent into a
> >> queue to be reviewed by FB staff.  Staff then (this is according to
> >> Facebook) review the account and determine whether to follow up.  In
> cases
> >> where the name *looks* real, they may ignore the complaint.  Sometimes
> >> they do, sometimes they don't; if they choose to proceed, they will
> often
> >> deactivate the user's account, or ask for government identification.
> >>
> >> I've tracked about 50 instances of the latter, mostly in MENA (though
> >> that's my area of focus, so I wouldn't say it's representative of any
> sort
> >> of bias), but some in the US as well.
> >>
> >> Thus, I wouldn't say there's a pattern in authoritarian states, but
> >> rather, there's a pattern with activists, who are targeted by their
> >> opponents.
> >>
> >> I published this last September on the subject:
> >> http://opennet.net/policing-content-quasi-public-sphere; there's a
> >> section dedicated to Facebook alone.
> >>
> >>
> >> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 8:45 AM, Steven Clift <clift at e-democracy.org
> >wrote:
> >>
> >>> So, how actively does Facebook enforce its real identity requirement in
> >>> authoritarian states?
> >>>
> >>> How do they do this and how does enforcement compare with the U.S. for
> >>> example?
> >>>
> >>> When I met with Somali NGOs in Kenya, it was stated that just about
> every
> >>> active Somali on Facebook uses an alternative identity to be safer as
> well
> >>> as to be listen to for what they are saying instead of being dismissed
> for
> >>> being from x or y clan or organization.
> >>>
> >>> Steven Clift
> >>>  On Feb 8, 2011 7:34 AM, "Jillian C. York" <jilliancyork at gmail.com>
> >>> wrote:
> >>> > I think it's worth pointing out a small inaccuracy in this piece:
> >>> Ghonim was
> >>> > one of many of the FB page's admins, is not the current admin, and
> did
> >>> not
> >>> > create the page originally.
> >>> >
> >>> > I say this not to diminish his work or the manner in which Egyptians
> >>> view
> >>> > him now (lots of tweets yesterday calling him a hero), but to point
> out
> >>> that
> >>> > he did not take credit for that, rather Hounshell attributed it to
> him.
> >>> > Lots of others were involved in the creation and maintenance of that
> >>> page,
> >>> > many of whom have chosen to remain anonymous (and have thus suffered
> >>> > Facebook's wrath again and again; recall the page going down in
> >>> December for
> >>> > that very reason).
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> > On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 12:14 AM, elham gheytanchi <
> >>> elhamucla at hotmail.com>wrote:
> >>> >
> >>> >> just read this about him:
> >>> >>
> >>> >> A New Leader For Egypt's Protesters? - By Blake Hounshell
> >>> >>
> >>> >> CAIRO ? Twelve days ago, Wael Ghonim posted a chilling message on
> his
> >>> >> Twitter account. "Pray for #Egypt," he wrote. "Very worried as it
> >>> seems
> >>> >> that government is planning a war crime tomorrow against people. We
> >>> are
> >>> >> all ready to die."
> >>> >>
> >>> >> And then he disappeared.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> One day later, a huge, angry crowd -- choking on tear gas and
> braving
> >>> fire
> >>> >> hoses, rubber bullets, and live ammunition -- overwhelmed thousands
> of
> >>> >> black-helmeted riot police and surged into Cairo's central Tahrir
> >>> Square,
> >>> >> setting the stage for a standoff between protesters and President
> >>> Hosni
> >>> >> Mubarak that is well into its second week.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Ghonim, a Dubai-based Google executive who hadn't been seen or heard
> >>> from
> >>> >> since Jan. 27, was freed on Monday, Feb. 7, after an international
> >>> >> campaign for his release. "Freedom is a bless that deserves fighting
> >>> for
> >>> >> it," he tweeted shortly after 8 p.m., Cairo time.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Ghonim appeared Monday evening on Dream 2, a private channel owned
> by
> >>> >> Egyptian tycoon Naguib Sawiris, and gave a devastating, emotional
> >>> >> interview that cut deeply into the image the Mubarak regime has been
> >>> >> trying to paint of the protesters.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Looking deeply shaken, his eyes haunted and voice breaking, Ghonim
> >>> >> insisted, "This was a revolution of the youth of all of Egypt. I'm
> not
> >>> a
> >>> >> hero."
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Gaining strength throughout the interview, Ghonim said he wasn't
> >>> tortured,
> >>> >> but was kidnapped by four armed men, blindfolded, and questioned
> >>> >> relentlessly about how the protesters pulled off the uprising (they
> >>> "had
> >>> >> no idea," he said). But later, when the host showed photographs of
> >>> young
> >>> >> Egyptians who have lost their lives over the last few weeks, Ghonim
> >>> wept
> >>> >> openly and then walked away, saying they died "because of those who
> >>> cling
> >>> >> to power."
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Many people here had speculated that Ghonim was the administrator of
> >>> the
> >>> >> "We Are All Khaled Said" Facebook page, set up to commemorate a
> >>> >> 28-year-old youth who was brutally beaten to death on June 6, 2010,
> by
> >>> >> police at an Internet cafe in Alexandria. It was the page's call for
> >>> >> nationwide demonstrations across Egypt -- along with the spark
> >>> provided by
> >>> >> nearby Tunisia -- that lit the flame of revolution, activists say.
> >>> What
> >>> >> was so effective about the Jan. 25 protest was that "it was a clear
> >>> call
> >>> >> to action," said Nasser Weddady, civil rights outreach director for
> >>> the
> >>> >> American Islamic Congress in Boston. "Everybody wants to stop
> >>> torture."
> >>> >>
> >>> >> In the interview, Ghonim admitted for the first time that he was
> >>> indeed
> >>> >> the voice behind the page -- though he said repeatedly that it was
> >>> others
> >>> >> "on the ground" who made it all happen. "I have been away for 12
> >>> days."
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Ironically, by kidnapping, detaining, and then releasing Ghonim --
> >>> >> instantly turning him into a nationwide celebrity -- the regime may
> >>> have
> >>> >> just created an undisputed leader for a movement that in recent days
> >>> has
> >>> >> struggled to find its footing, seemingly outfoxed by a government
> >>> skilled
> >>> >> in the dark arts of quashing and marginalizing dissent. Within
> minutes
> >>> of
> >>> >> his interview, his personal Facebook page had surged in popularity,
> >>> and
> >>> >> the tweets were coming so fast that #Ghonim briefly became a
> trending
> >>> >> topic on Twitter.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Ghonim's reappearance comes at a critical time for the protesters.
> Now
> >>> >> that the galvanizing moment has passed, it's not clear where their
> >>> >> movement goes from here. It's one thing to build a coalition against
> >>> >> police brutality, something Egyptians of all classes have suffered
> >>> from
> >>> >> for decades; it's quite another to rally people around more complex
> >>> >> demands, such as constitutional reform or media oversight. And after
> a
> >>> >> week of nonstop propaganda on state television against the
> protesters
> >>> --
> >>> >> painted simultaneously as dangerous Islamists and Israeli agents --
> >>> it's
> >>> >> not even clear that an overwhelming majority of Egyptians want
> Mubarak
> >>> out
> >>> >> immediately, as the folks in Tahrir insist.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> For the protest movement, decentralization is at once the source of
> >>> its
> >>> >> power and its potential Achilles' heel.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> The organization that administers the square itself, it's important
> to
> >>> >> understand, is a completely separate entity from the various other
> >>> >> Facebook groups, political parties, and other movements that often
> get
> >>> (or
> >>> >> take) credit for the uprising. Ahmed Naguib, 33, a member of the
> >>> >> 1,000-plus strong Tahrir organizing committee, told me that few of
> the
> >>> >> volunteers who man the barricades, seek to root out regime
> >>> infiltrators,
> >>> >> staff the increasingly well-stocked field hospitals and pharmacies,
> >>> and
> >>> >> bring in supplies are "political" types -- as is the case with the
> >>> roughly
> >>> >> 100-member steering committee that more or less makes key logistical
> >>> >> decisions. Many if not most of these people didn't even know each
> >>> other
> >>> >> before last week -- and they aren't necessarily activists. The ad
> hoc
> >>> >> organizers have resisted efforts by some groups to secure
> >>> representational
> >>> >> seating in the inner circle of the steering committee, Naguib told
> me.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> It's true that some of the youth groups are in communication with
> the
> >>> >> "Wise Men" -- the self-appointed council of elders that has offered
> >>> itself
> >>> >> up as a go-between with the regime -- but others complain that they
> >>> have
> >>> >> little visibility on those discussions and distrust an initiative
> that
> >>> >> smacks of selling out those who gave their lives taking and
> defending
> >>> the
> >>> >> square. But the youth groups don't necessarily represent the
> >>> unaffiliated
> >>> >> masses in the square, either. Nobody I've spoken with, moreover,
> >>> >> recognized the handful of "January 25 youth" who met briefly with
> Vice
> >>> >> President Omar Suleiman on Saturday, nor the "Coalition of Angry
> >>> Youth"
> >>> >> who gave a news conference on Sunday, to give their view of the
> >>> >> negotiations.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Meanwhile, splits are emerging even within groups. Over the weekend,
> >>> when
> >>> >> the Army began moving its tanks further into the square in a bid to
> >>> push
> >>> >> the protesters south of the Egyptian Museum, dozens of young members
> >>> of
> >>> >> the Muslim Brotherhood rushed to lie in front of the tracks -- over
> >>> the
> >>> >> objections of a senior Brotherhood official. At a news conference on
> >>> >> Sunday, senior leaders of the Islamist movement stressed repeatedly
> >>> that
> >>> >> they had "no special agenda," a clear attempt to head off criticism
> of
> >>> >> their decision to negotiate with the regime.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Inside Tahrir, different groups are gradually staking out separate
> >>> >> geographic areas, with the Muslim Brotherhood dominating the
> megaphone
> >>> at
> >>> >> the southern end of the square, while the socialists have assembled
> an
> >>> >> entire speaker system a few dozen yards west, and various smaller
> >>> groups
> >>> >> are sprinkled elsewhere.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> "Everybody here is organizing," said political analyst Hisham
> Kassem,
> >>> "but
> >>> >> there's nobody to negotiate with. We have no control over the
> square,
> >>> and
> >>> >> they don't either."
> >>> >>
> >>> >>
> >>> >> ------------------------------
> >>> >> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2011 20:14:55 -0800
> >>> >> From: marycjoyce at gmail.com
> >>> >> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >>> >> Subject: [liberationtech] Wael Ghonim interview
> >>> >>
> >>> >>
> >>> >> This interview with Wael Ghonim is absolutely critical to those
> hoping
> >>> to
> >>> >> understand the digital aspect of the protests in Egypt. Wael is the
> >>> >> formerly imprisoned admin of the "We are all Khaled Said" Facebook
> >>> group
> >>> >> (also a Google employee) who is an influential figure in the
> democracy
> >>> >> movement.
> >>> >>
> >>> >>
> >>> >>
> >>>
> http://egypt.alive.in/2011/02/08/dream-tv-interview-with-wael-ghonim-part-2-with-english-subtitles/
> >>> >>
> >>> >> --
> >>> >> MARY C. JOYCE
> >>> >> Founder | The Meta-Activism Project | www.Meta-Activism.org<
> >>> http://www.meta-activism.org/>
> >>> >> Digital Activism Consultant | www.MaryJoyce.com<
> >>> http://www.maryjoyce.com/>
> >>>
> >>> >> Mobile | +1.857.928.1297
> >>> >>
> >>> >>
> >>> >> _______________________________________________ liberationtech
> mailing
> >>> list
> >>> >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu Should you need to change your
> >>> >> subscription options, please go to:
> >>> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech If you
> >>> would
> >>> >> like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click above)
> >>> next to
> >>> >> "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily digest?" You
> >>> will
> >>> >> need the user name and password you receive from the list moderator
> in
> >>> >> monthly reminders. Should you need immediate assistance, please
> >>> contact the
> >>> >> list moderator. Please don't forget to follow us on
> >>> >> http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >>> >>
> >>> >> _______________________________________________
> >>> >> liberationtech mailing list
> >>> >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >>> >>
> >>> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>> >>
> >>> >> If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you
> >>> click
> >>> >> above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a
> daily
> >>> >> digest?"
> >>> >>
> >>> >> You will need the user name and password you receive from the list
> >>> >> moderator in monthly reminders.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list
> >>> moderator.
> >>> >>
> >>> >> Please don't forget to follow us on
> >>> http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >>> >>
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> >
> >>> > --
> >>> > Berkman Center for Internet and Society |
> >>> > https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jyork
> >>> > jilliancyork.com | @jilliancyork | tel: +1-857-891-4244
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Berkman Center for Internet and Society |
> >> https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jyork
> >> jilliancyork.com | @jilliancyork | tel: +1-857-891-4244
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
> >>
> >> liberationtech mailing list
> >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >>
> >> Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >>
> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>
> >> If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click
> >> above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily
> >> digest?"
> >>
> >> You will need the user name and password you receive from the list
> >> moderator in monthly reminders.
> >>
> >> Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list moderator.
> >>
> >> Please don't forget to follow us on
> http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Rebecca MacKinnon
> > Schwartz Senior Fellow, New America Foundation
> > Co-founder, GlobalVoicesOnline.org
> > Cell: +1-617-939-3493
> > E-mail: rebecca.mackinnon at gmail.com
> > Blog: RConversation.blogs.com
> > Twitter: @rmack <http://twitter.com/rmack>
> > Facebook: facebook.com/rmackinnon
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> Berkman Center for Internet and Society |
> https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/people/jyork
> jilliancyork.com | @jilliancyork | tel: +1-857-891-4244
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 11:12:05 -0500
> From: Katherine Maher <katherine.maher at gmail.com>
> To: Walid Al-Saqaf <admin at alkasir.com>
> Cc: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Mubarak thugs move from streets to the
>        Internet
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTikxkDMACwomMG_SuaxeFmqrcmHjah4wyrTfjpZh at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Following up on Walid's comment, a piece on this in RWW:
>
>
> http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/egypts_facebook_police_target_protesters_facebook.php
>
> <
> http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/egypts_facebook_police_target_protesters_facebook.php
> >
> Best,
> Katherine
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 7:39 AM, Walid Al-Saqaf <admin at alkasir.com> wrote:
>
> >
> > I've been following Al Jazeera (in Arabic) just a minute ago where
> activist
> > Hiba Aql said that today she was surprised by the emergence of a strong
> > pro-Mubarak campaign on facebook. She along with other anti-Mubarak
> > activists who mobilized to campaign for the revolt are struggling to
> fight
> > back virtually against an 'incredible' wave of attacks launched by
> > 'pro-Mubarak cyber thugs' who have been 'paid' to threaten, demoralize
> and
> > attack cyber activists. This is an interesting twist where money and
> > resources are using the Internet to squash the online movement of the
> > Egyptian youth.
> >
> > I'm hoping the pro-freedom camp succeed and overcome this, but this is
> > reminder that the Internet does have a dark side that can indeed be
> utilized
> > by states to fight back.
> >
> > Sincerely,
> >
> > Walid
> >
> > -----------------
> >
> > Walid Al-Saqaf
> > Founder & Administrator
> > alkasir for mapping and circumventing cyber censorship
> > https://alkasir.com <walid.al-saqaf at oru.se>
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > liberationtech mailing list
> > liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >
> > Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click
> > above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily
> > digest?"
> >
> > You will need the user name and password you receive from the list
> > moderator in monthly reminders.
> >
> > Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list moderator.
> >
> > Please don't forget to follow us on http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Katherine R. Maher
>
> katherine.maher at gmail.com
> +1.203.858.7316
> @krmaher
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 14:31:05 -0200
> From: alex <alex.hache at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: [liberationtech] Fwd: Designing a useful and robust social
>        collaboration tool
> Message-ID: <4D516FC9.20203 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>
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> Hash: SHA1
>
> Dear all
>
> this is my first time writing to this list which I really enjoy reading
> I would like to bring to your attention the existence of Lorea, a one
> year more or less initiative for the development of free, secured,
> federated and self managed social networks for the people.
> I copy below a presentation in English of our hacktivist project
> extracted from a recent article drafted with a colleague on the issue
> of "technological sovereignty and social networks":
>
> https://n-1.cc/pg/blog/n1crew/read/76157/reclaim-the-networks-technological-sovereignty-for-social-networks
>
> Lorea is a project organized by an informal collective that was
> started in 2009 by individuals concerned with security and privacy
> issues in this age of surveillance, control, and data mining. The
> development team includes an army of ?good fairies,? comprised of
> software developers and hacktivists. Lorea is a hotbed of free, secure
> social networks which have given impulse to the rise of self-managed
> federated social networks. They are free because they are integrally
> based on free software and also because they foster the freedom of
> their inhabitants and the self-organization of civil society. To this
> end, Lorea implements and develops tools for facilitating
> collaboration between individuals, online work, and the dissemination
> and generation of collective memory (wikis, blogs, etherpad,
> calendars, task management, mailing lists, forums, microblogging,
> files sharing, etc.) in a secure and sovereign fashion.
>
> The starting point for Lorea is Elgg, the most popular free software
> for social networks, but instead of limiting itself to offering
> servers on which it is installed, the group researches federation
> protocols. The defense of network neutrality as the fundamental
> principle of its architecture and the search for distribution and
> decentralization responds to the group?s desire to bring down the
> walls of the panoptic 2.0 and escape from the ghetto.
>
> These networks are self-managed because Lorea is a non-profit,
> independent, open, and self-sufficient project. We don?t talk of
> ?users,? but rather of ?inhabitants? because we prefer a conscious
> coexistence instead of a simple, passive client relationship. Lorea
> inhabitants actively participate in the design, development, and
> maintenance of the network,s working to implement the federation
> protocols, develop code, maintain safe servers, hunt down bugs,
> translate the interfaces into various languages, test user
> friendliness, document its development, and to undertake
> dissemination, help, or welcome activities for new inhabitants. There
> is thus no institution or formalized association behind Lorea, but
> rather a community of inhabitants.
>
> Lorea puts great stock in security and privacy. Because of this, the
> community works actively in the field of data protection, aiming for
> the creation of a polycentric peer-to-peer server network. They are
> also committed to the implementation of technologies such as the GPG
> (GNU Privacy Guard), which allows the contents circulating through the
> network to be encrypted so that they are read only by those for whom
> they are intended. Using a scalable visibility level system, they seek
> to create circles of confidence, making it possible to manage multiple
> identities.
>
> Furthermore, the community of Lorea inhabitants works to normalize
> conscientious and respectful practices, both with their own security
> and privacy settings and with those of others. Throughout the
> projects? documentation, inhabitants are reminded that privacy within
> an SNS is an ambiguous notion at best:   "Do not expect and demand the
> impossible, do not expose things when you are doubtful with respect to
> their publication, always think of how what you publish may affect the
> privacy of others, and do nothing which you wouldn?t want done to you.
> We recommend that our inhabitants be responsible and imaginative and
> that they use all measures they deem necessary to maintain their
> privacy intact. Remember: Big Brother is watching you"
>
> you can also find more information at :
>
> https://lorea.org/
> https://n-1.cc/pg/groups/7826/lorea/ (this is our working group which
> exemplifies how works a federated group across all our SNS)*
>
> *Our main language across the project is Spanish as many of the
> inhabitants of our social networks are Spanish speakers which explains
> why many didactic materials such as articles, presentations and the
> "manual for inhabitants" are still only available in Spanish,
> nonetheless English is also used inside developers, testers and
> bughunting working groups. As said before this is a non profit,
> voluntary and self managed project... anyhow, for those who would like
> to access more information, please don't doubt contacting me
>
> thanks and take care
>
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 09:04:50 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: Laura DeNardis <laura.denardis at yale.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Yale ISP Seeking Law & Media Program
>        Director
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTinxr5ZBUTFxu3n76DjdoNzo5K_Hc8AK-jxwScdH at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
> The Yale Information Society Project is now accepting applications for a
> Law
> & Media Program Director. The Yale Information Society Project is an
> interdisciplinary center that studies the implications of the Internet and
> new information technologies for law and society.
>
>
> The Program Director should be an individual interested in a career in
> teaching, practice, or public service in an area of law and media such as
> First Amendment law, communications law and policy, intellectual property
> law, civil liberties and new media, new media business models for
> journalism, citizen journalism, government transparency, and media studies
> generally.
>
>
> The Law & Media Program Director will report to the ISP Executive Director
> and will have the following responsibilities: helping to run the Knight Law
> & Media Program at Yale Law School; recruiting and coordinating students
> who
> become Knight Law & Media Scholars; assisting with fundraising and project
> development; taking press calls on contemporary issues in law & media;
> speaking in high profile venues on behalf of the Yale ISP; and developing
> an
> individual research agenda and publishing individual scholarship.
>
>
> The Program Director will also work with students in the Media Freedom and
> Information Access (MFIA) Clinic, which engages in impact litigation to
> support a robust investigative role for news organizations and to preserve
> the public's right of access to information.  The Program Director will
> help
> coordinate various special events, such as freedom of information boot
> camps, contribute to docket management, and manage MFIA activities during
> the summer months.
>
>
> Applicants should hold a J.D. or a Ph.D. in a media-related area.  The
> candidate should be an excellent writer and well-organized.  Familiarity
> with FOIA and access issues is considered a plus, but not necessary.
>
>
> The Program Director will receive a salary (negotiable) plus Yale
> University
> benefits. The Program Director will be expected to be in residence in New
> Haven and begin the appointment on or before August 1, 2011.
>
>
> Application materials should include the following:
>
>
> (1) A cover letter describing qualifications and including a statement of
> the applicant?s scholarly or clinical research area;
> (2) A curriculum vitae;
> (3) A law school or graduate school transcript;
> (4) At least one sample of recent scholarly writing;
> (5) Two letters of recommendation.
>
>
> Applications must be postmarked no later than March 25, 2011.  The new Law
> &
> Media Program Director will be announced by the end of April 2011.   For
> additional information please contact Deborah Sestito at
> deborah.sestito at yale.edu<
> deborah.sestito at yale.edu?subject=2010-2011%20Fellowships>
> .
>
>
> Application materials should be sent (in electronic copy) to Deborah
> Sestito
> at deborah.sestito at yale.edu.
>
> http://yaleisp.org/2011/02/yale-isp-seeking-law-media-program-director/
>
> Thanks, Laura DeNardis
> --
> Dr. Laura DeNardis
> Executive Director
> Yale Information Society Project
> Lecturer and Research Scholar
>  Yale Law School
> P.O. Box 208215
> New Haven, CT 06520
> http://lauradenardis.org
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 16:29:55 -0500
> From: Katrin Verclas <katrin at mobileactive.org>
> To: Stanford tech list List <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in
>        repressive      environments
> Message-ID: <25423D8D-A834-4AAB-BF50-2340BA32CE99 at mobileactive.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Would love to hear what the list thinks of this post:
>
> http://blog.standbytaskforce.com/?p=259
>
> My take:  It does not go far enough to secure certain communications
> mentioned there.  Also, as an aside, the Ushahidi SMS Anonymizer is totally
> and misleadingly misnamed.
>
> Katrin
>
> Katrin Verclas
> MobileActive.org
> katrin at mobileactive.org
>
> skype/twitter: katrinskaya
> (347) 281-7191
>
> A global network of people using mobile technology for social impact
> http://mobileactive.org
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 17:48:52 -0600
> From: David Dahl <david at ddahl.com>
> To: "Danny O'Brien" <DObrien at cpj.org>
> Cc: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] pgp message encryption and decrypion
>        using just a browser
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTim_z2E+fsT4_Ft+R42HxYCMxeO1Rp8==h1Lcx9=@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> I have been wanting to follow up on this thread, which means writing
> some code.:)
>
> I have distilled the 3 methods needed to construct any kind of
> PGP-like web application. My new extension, DOMCrypt, attaches a
> 'crypt' property to each web page giving Javascript developers
> crypt.generateKeyPair(), crypt.encrypt() and crypt.decrypt().
>
> All of the underlying crypto code is handled by NSS - the same library
> used for the SSL/HTTPS. This is not a 'native JS' solution. It is fast
> C code under the hood.
>
> See http://mozilla.ddahl.com/domcrypt/demo.html for a demo, the code
> is here: https://github.com/daviddahl/domcrypt
>
> Regards,
>
> David
>
> On Sun, Sep 26, 2010 at 6:21 AM, David Dahl <david at ddahl.com> wrote:
> > I have been experimenting with the JavaScript API for PKI that is
> > provided by Firefox Sync. The underlying bits are implemented in C++
> > (NSS), so it is pretty fast. I am slowly building up a toolkit for
> > messaging in a pseudo-anonymous fashion called "Droplettr" and am
> > looking for contributors. The entire thing is open source and is
> > designed to be ?used like a protocol instead of a walled garden.
> >
> > Repo: http://bitbucket.org/daviddahl/droplettr/
> >
> > Site: https://droplettr.com/
> >
> > Things are in a state of brokenness at the moment, as this is a side
> > research project of mine.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > David
> >
> > On Sat, Sep 25, 2010 at 12:00 AM, Danny O'Brien <DObrien at cpj.org> wrote:
> >> This really isn't what you want Frank (at all!), but its bizarreness
> plus tangential connection to your question was too good to miss:
> >>
> >> http://www.links.org/?p=993
> >>
> >> It's TLS (including client-side certificates), re-implemented in
> in-browser Javascript. Ben's point is that such an implementation allows
> greater experimentation with security UI, which I think everyone agrees is
> the current Hard Problem.
> >>
> >> d.
> >>
> >> On Sep 23, 2010, at 11:08 PM, Frank Corrigan wrote:
> >>
> >>> For some time I have been investigating the availability of web pages
> >>> that provide easy to use password creation and message encryption
> >>> functions, which only depend upon web browsers inbuilt javascript
> >>> capabilities and can therefore be downloaded and used off line. And
> >>> works across all common OSs and browsers.
> >>>
> >>> Examples are
> >>> https://www.pwdhash.com
> >>> as one of many options for password creation
> >>>
> >>> and http://www.hanewin.net/encrypt/PGcrypt.htm
> >>> to encrypt messages using a recipients pgp Public key.
> >>>
> >>> The help I am requesting is whether anyone knows of an online resource,
> >>> that meets the above criteria, that can not only encrypt text using a
> >>> pgp Public key but also has a facility to decrypt a pgp message with
> the
> >>> recipients Private key?
> >>>
> >>> I am aware of FireGPG:
> >>> http://getfiregpg.org/s/home
> >>>
> >>> which is excellent, though sadly now discontinued, but it is tied to
> >>> Fire Fox through an add-on and it's functions are dependent upon a
> local
> >>> install of GPG.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks
> >>> Frank
> >>> _______________________________________________
> >>> liberationtech mailing list
> >>> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >>>
> >>> Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >>>
> >>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> liberationtech mailing list
> >> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >>
> >> Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >>
> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 18:19:40 -0800
> From: Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in
>        repressive environments
> Message-ID: <4D51F9BC.8000407 at appelbaum.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
> On 02/08/2011 01:29 PM, Katrin Verclas wrote:
> > Would love to hear what the list thinks of this post:
> >
> > http://blog.standbytaskforce.com/?p=259
>
> Just quickly skimming, I see a ton of stuff that made me slap my forehead.
>
> They suggest not using gmail because of "hacking fears" but in reality,
> gmail is probably the best from a security standpoint of any public or
> free webmail/email provider. The cost of gmail is your privacy and in
> return you're given targeted ads. This is probably an improvement over
> leaking lots of data to the local network where the targeting is violence.
>
> They suggest hushmail - I can't impress on people how bad that advice
> is! Use PGP and gmail before using hushmail. Hushmail has proven
> themselves to be untrustworthy (in architecture and perhaps personally)
> for the only thing that made them special:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hushmail#Controversy
>
> Their advice on passphrases is OK, I guess.
>
> They suggest using Skype for sensitive content - this is a horrible
> idea. Skype is absolute garbage if you're worried about state sponsored
> attackers. It's probably absolute garbage if you're worried about some
> people from the Chaos Computer Club too.
>
> If you have to use non-free software, I suggest zfone, redphone, or
> another system that at least has an open specification or behaves in a
> manner that could be vetted by a third party.
>
> zfone:
> http://zfoneproject.com/
>
> redphone:
> http://www.whispersys.com/
>
> Otherwise, I'd suggest some free software with ZRTP:
>
> zrtp:
> http://zfoneproject.com/prod_asterisk.html
>
> Gnu ZRTP (probably not ready for prime time)
> http://www.gnutelephony.org/index.php/GNU_ZRTP
>
> People who do not require encrypted voice and video would be better
> served by using OTR in the chat client of their choice:
> http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/
>
> They also suggest using HTTPS when possible - I'd suggest the EFF
> project HTTPS-everywhere:
> https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere
>
> I'd suggest (as Tor developers do) using the Tor Browser Bundle:
> https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html
>
> Personally, I think all of the data being sent by an activist in the
> field should go over Tor. If you're in an area where the traffic is
> being recorded, a failure to anonymize anything could be a seriously
> dangerous failure in the long run.
>
> >
> > My take:  It does not go far enough to secure certain communications
> > mentioned there.  Also, as an aside, the Ushahidi SMS Anonymizer is
> > totally and misleadingly misnamed.
> >
>
> Probably anything with SMS in the name is going to be misleading if it
> also has Anonymous or Anonymizer in the name. SMS but specifically SMS
> and GSM are a total privacy nightmare. With only a phone number it is
> usually possible to track someone globally.
>
> All the best,
> Jacob
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 18:24:02 -0800
> From: Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] pgp message encryption and decrypion
>        using just a browser
> Message-ID: <4D51FAC2.4010100 at appelbaum.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> On 02/08/2011 03:48 PM, David Dahl wrote:
> > I have been wanting to follow up on this thread, which means writing
> > some code.:)
> >
> > I have distilled the 3 methods needed to construct any kind of
> > PGP-like web application. My new extension, DOMCrypt, attaches a
> > 'crypt' property to each web page giving Javascript developers
> > crypt.generateKeyPair(), crypt.encrypt() and crypt.decrypt().
> >
> > All of the underlying crypto code is handled by NSS - the same library
> > used for the SSL/HTTPS. This is not a 'native JS' solution. It is fast
> > C code under the hood.
> >
> > See http://mozilla.ddahl.com/domcrypt/demo.html for a demo, the code
> > is here: https://github.com/daviddahl/domcrypt
> >
>
> Hi David,
>
> Can you go into a little more detail? What is your threat model? How
> does this stand up to say, XSS? It seems rather dangerous to have a
> javascript API for encrypting and decrypting messages - also is it
> lacking signatures on purpose?
>
> I'm a bit curious if you plan to implement an actual PGP implementation
> - that would be useful, though the web browser seems like an awfully
> dangerous place to do it.
>
> All the best,
> Jacob
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 21:53:23 -0500
> From: katmagic <the.magical.kat at gmail.com>
> To: Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>
> Cc: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in
>        repressive environments
> Message-ID: <20110208215323.1fc19e10 at katmagic.invalid>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 18:19:40 -0800
> Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net> wrote:
>
> > redphone:
> > http://www.whispersys.com/
>
> RedPhone has been claiming that it's going to release its source code for
> quite
> some time now.[1] Do you know anything more about them than is available on
> their website, particularly why they're waiting so long to release the
> source?
> [1] http://www.whispersys.com/support.html#8
>
>  ~ katmagic
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>
> Message: 12
> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 19:07:59 -0800
> From: Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>
> To: katmagic <the.magical.kat at gmail.com>
> Cc: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in
>        repressive environments
> Message-ID: <4D52050F.9070706 at appelbaum.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> On 02/08/2011 06:53 PM, katmagic wrote:
> > On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 18:19:40 -0800
> > Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net> wrote:
> >
> >> redphone:
> >> http://www.whispersys.com/
> >
> > RedPhone has been claiming that it's going to release its source code for
> quite
> > some time now.[1] Do you know anything more about them than is available
> on
> > their website, particularly why they're waiting so long to release the
> source?
> > [1] http://www.whispersys.com/support.html#8
>
> I've cc'ed Moxie. I think that he's simply busy making it better.
>
> It's too bad that he won't make it free software - it would become the
> golden standard. Moxie knows what he's doing. Anyone on this list with
> funding should dump a metric ton of cash on him to share his work as
> free software.
>
> All the best,
> Jacob
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 13
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 19:03:03 -0800
> From: 25 Bahman <25bahman.art at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: [liberationtech] iran 14 Feb protest facebook (25 bahman)
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTik9UsOFdb3+OR+ixSP4bBwmxN+trVtvVRkkHS7M at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> hello
>
> maybe you have read the news about mousavi and karroubi in iran ask for
> green protests on 14 feb (25 bahman) and the news on new york times about
> facebook group that has been created for supporting the protest:
>
> new york times:
> https://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/08/world/middleeast/08iran.html
>
> facebook:
> http://www.facebook.com/25bahman
>
> group now has more than 20,000 followers.  we are writing to say that the
> group who is running the facebook will do english interview and it will be
> post to a blog we are in contact with.
>
> we are writing to ask if this group has any questions for the facebook 25
> bahman administrators so that it can be include in the interview
>
> thanks please email them to me.
>
> thanks.
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 14
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 22:11:06 -0500
> From: Danny O'Brien <DObrien at cpj.org>
> To: "liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu"
>        <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in
>        repressive environments
> Message-ID: <536FD660-32F5-4917-BB29-8A903AA432F1 at cpj.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
>
> On Feb 9, 2011, at 9:19 AM, Jacob Appelbaum wrote:
>
> On 02/08/2011 01:29 PM, Katrin Verclas wrote:
> Would love to hear what the list thinks of this post:
>
> http://blog.standbytaskforce.com/?p=259
>
>
> They suggest using Skype for sensitive content - this is a horrible
> idea. Skype is absolute garbage if you're worried about state sponsored
> attackers. It's probably absolute garbage if you're worried about some
> people from the Chaos Computer Club too.
>
>
> <sticks head above parapet>
>
> I wouldn't mind someone spelling out the practical (or potential practical)
> attacks on Skype in more detail. Skype use is incredibly prevalent among
> at-risk media and activists. Right now I'd say people feel it falls in the
>  "gmail" category ? not the best thing to use by a long chalk, but certainly
> better than nothing.
>
> In particular, I haven't seen a good outlines of how the Skype protocol
> itself is compromised or could be (though there's a fair bit of work on
> reverse-engineering it). The in-the-wild attacks on Skype users I *have*
> heard all involve attacks that compromise the client or obtain user
> passwords through malware. That combined with the circumstantial evidence
> that of state-actors' apparent fury at Skype for not providing intercept
> access would seem to point that it's not *garbage* per se. Or at least make
> it hard to compellingly onvince people to move off it.
>
> d.
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 15
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 19:14:36 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>,
>        liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: [liberationtech] Anchor Free
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTi=jkSjXctJkGV0K8joqH+kJ=Lnb6CXZcn__eh_o at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Have you guys seen this?
>
> YC
>
>
>
>  *SOURCE: AnchorFree*
> <http://www.anchorfree.com/>
> Feb 08, 2011 11:00 ET
> Popular Privacy and Anti-Censorship Tool Sees Surge in Traffic as Egyptians
> Struggle to Stay Connected Online
>
> One Million Egyptians Access Censored Content With AnchorFree's Hotspot
> Shield, More Than 10 Times the Pre-Revolt Number
>
> MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA--(Marketwire - February 8, 2011) - In response to their
> government's decision to curtail Internet communications, Egyptians turned
> to technology that enables freedom to access censored information. Masses
> of
> users in Egypt used technology solutions to access blocked sites such as
> Twitter, Facebook and Google. The tools have become one of the key
> technologies Egyptians have relied on to stay connected, communicate with
> each other, coordinate protests and deliver their messages to the world.
>
> AnchorFree, providers of the world's most popular free privacy tool Hotspot
> Shield, witnessed a dramatic uptick in usage in the Middle East as soon as
> the Egyptian government began blocking sites. Traffic surged to ten times
> the average amount in Egypt, from 100,000 to one million users, as
> Egyptians
> worked to rally together and share with the world what was happening in
> their country.
>
> Over the past couple of years, Hotspot Shield has proven to be a reliable
> way for people in countries like China and Tunisia to overcome government
> censorship and maintain their privacy and anonymity while using the
> Internet.
>
> "We created Hotspot Shield as a privacy tool to keep people secure from
> hackers online and maintain their anonymity. It was never our intention to
> have it serve as an anti-censorship tool, but in times like these, it gives
> us great pride to know that people can use it to maintain free speech,"
> said
> the CEO of AnchorFree, David Gorodyansky. "Our spike in traffic shows that
> one million Egyptians were able to access censored content with the help of
> Hotspot Shield, despite government intervention."
>
> Traffic subsequently plummeted once the government shut down the country's
> ISPs on January 27, initiating a five-day Internet blackout. Despite this
> additional hurdle to free speech, citizens still managed to access blocked
> Internet content by using dial-up services and turning on Hotspot Shield.
>
> Hotspot Shield works by establishing a secure tunnel between a user's
> computer and Internet connection, encrypting each user's entire Web
> sessions
> to keep users protected. When users connect to Hotspot Shield it encrypts
> every page they visit and makes them private online. In the United States
> and Europe people use Hotspot Shield to secure their browsing while at home
> and on Wi-Fi networks. In regions with censorship, Hotspot Shield is used
> to
> enable complete freedom and privacy online. Watch this
> video<
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80179&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fbit.ly%2faWVY75%2b
> >
> to
> learn more about how Hotspot Shield works.
>
> To download Hotspot Shield, visit:
> http://www.hotspotshield.com<
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80182&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.hotspotshield.com
> >.
> The program is free and will install automatically. Anyone having problems
> accessing the site<
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80185&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.hotspotshield.com
> >
> can
> email win at afshield.com or mac at afshield.com to get a free version of the
> tool
> sent to them directly. Hotspot Shield is available on all Windows operating
> systems, as well as Mac OS X (10.6 Snow Leopard), Mac OS X (10.5 Leopard)
> and Mac OS X (10.4 Tiger).
>
> *About AnchorFree
> *AnchorFree enables millions of users globally to surf the Web freely and
> securely through Hotspot Shield, the world's first and most popular
> ad-supported virtual private network. More than 8.5 million monthly users
> in
> 100 countries rely on Hotspot Shield to secure their Web browsing
> experience, proliferating freedom of information online and democratizing
> the Web. It is the only free way to ensure privacy and total anonymity
> online on desktop computers, laptops and iPhones. Hotspot Shield is powered
> by AnchorFree's proprietary communication platform that enables marketers
> to
> distribute ad campaigns, messaging and content to millions of users,
> totaling over two billion page views every month. AnchorFree is a privately
> held venture backed Company and is based in Mountain View, California. For
> more information or to download Hotspot Shield, please visit
> www.anchorfree.com<
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80188&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.anchorfree.com
> >.
> The UK version of the tool, Expat Shield is available at
> http://www.expatshield.com<
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80191&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.expatshield.com
> >
> .
>
> Media Contacts
> LaunchSquad (for AnchorFree)
> 415.625.8555
> anchorfree(at)launchsquad(dot)com
> Back <http://www.marketwire.com/en/1392338>
>
> Privacy Statement <http://www.marketwire.com/mw/include.do?pageid=516> |
> Terms
> of Service <http://www.marketwire.com/mw/include.do?pageid=476> |
> Sitemap<http://www.marketwire.com/mw/include.do?pageid=517> |? 2011
> Marketwire, Incorporated. All rights reserved.
> Your newswire of choice for expert news release distribution.
> 1-800-774-9473 (US)  |  1-888-299-0338 (Canada)  |  +44-20-7562-6550 (UK)
> -------------- next part --------------
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 16
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 21:17:53 -0600
> From: David Dahl <david at ddahl.com>
> To: Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>,
>        liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] pgp message encryption and decrypion
>        using just a browser
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTikUitmMw_pNrV-=AGmoR4-EVYtZsTatS2xcndp4 at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Jacob:
>
> The main threat here are the black holes we all routinely dump
> personal information into in the social web. We need an API available
> in the DOM to encrypt text and messages. This needs to happen as so
> much software development has moved to the browser - this is a logical
> evolution.
>
> I have not thought about the threat from XSS and other weaknesses a
> tool like this will have to deal with -yet. I have only had time to
> implement what you see in the demo. Signatures are no problem, I just
> have not written the front end.
>
> The DOM-accessible API is implemented in JavaScript (calling C
> libraries via jsctypes) behind the scenes in the chrome-privileged
> scope of Firefox. JavaScript (1.8.5) in Firefox allows for frozen
> objects and properties to lock things down:
>
> https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/freeze
> - which I plan on using to keep external scripts from changing
> properties in the API.
>
> There is a lot of work here to identify threats - quite a large test
> suite will be required. Another issue is what interface is secure
> enough to   type the passphrase into, and where do you keep your
> private key? Again, these things need to be figured out. For one, I
> plan on creating a generic chrome-privileged prompt to type in the
> passphrase. persistent storage is another matter altogether.
>
> I work at Mozilla and plan on hitting up the security team for advice
> on these issues as well. I would love to see a list of potential
> weaknesses from you, if you have the spare time.
>
> Cheers,
>
> David
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 8:24 PM, Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>
> wrote:
> >
> > Can you go into a little more detail? What is your threat model? How
> > does this stand up to say, XSS? It seems rather dangerous to have a
> > javascript API for encrypting and decrypting messages - also is it
> > lacking signatures on purpose?
> >
> > I'm a bit curious if you plan to implement an actual PGP implementation
> > - that would be useful, though the web browser seems like an awfully
> > dangerous place to do it.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 17
> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 22:28:54 -0500
> From: Moxie Marlinspike <moxie at thoughtcrime.org>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in
>        repressive environments
> Message-ID: <4D5209F6.8070002 at thoughtcrime.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
>
> On 02/08/2011 09:53 PM, katmagic wrote:
>
> > RedPhone has been claiming that it's going to release its source code for
> quite
> > some time now.[1] Do you know anything more about them than is available
> on
> > their website, particularly why they're waiting so long to release the
> source?
> > [1] http://www.whispersys.com/support.html#8
>
> Hey Kat, a few things have come up.  Originally, we were busy trying to
> get the software out of beta, it was changing rapidly, and we wanted to
> wait until we had a stable 1.0 release before making the source
> available for review.
>
> Since then we've gotten to a point where we're comfortable supporting
> the software commercially (although it's free for individual use), but
> the current hiccup for source code release is export control.  We've
> jumped through the legal hoops to ship RedPhone and TextSecure
> internationally, but all new legal hoops emerge in that area for
> "published" source code to commercial products.  We hope to resolve
> those issues soon.
>
> We'd appreciate it if any cryptography enthusiasts on this list would
> like to do a private review of the source.
>
> - moxie
>
> --
> http://www.thoughtcrime.org
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 18
> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 19:35:31 -0800
> From: Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The security and ethics of mapping in
>        repressive environments
> Message-ID: <4D520B83.2080504 at appelbaum.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
> On 02/08/2011 07:11 PM, Danny O'Brien wrote:
> >
> > On Feb 9, 2011, at 9:19 AM, Jacob Appelbaum wrote:
> >
> > On 02/08/2011 01:29 PM, Katrin Verclas wrote: Would love to hear what
> > the list thinks of this post:
> >
> > http://blog.standbytaskforce.com/?p=259
> >
> >
> > They suggest using Skype for sensitive content - this is a horrible
> > idea. Skype is absolute garbage if you're worried about state
> > sponsored attackers. It's probably absolute garbage if you're worried
> > about some people from the Chaos Computer Club too.
> >
> >
> > <sticks head above parapet>
> >
> > I wouldn't mind someone spelling out the practical (or potential
> > practical) attacks on Skype in more detail. Skype use is incredibly
> > prevalent among at-risk media and activists. Right now I'd say people
> > feel it falls in the  "gmail" category ? not the best thing to use by
> > a long chalk, but certainly better than nothing.
> >
>
> I'd start here:
> http://www.google.com/search?&q=skype+traffic+analysis
>
> I'd also read this:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skype#Security_and_privacy
>
> Gmail is very different from Skype in so many ways that it's not a
> meaningful comparison. It uses only open standards for the transport
> layers and then it is like most other email systems - there is simply no
> protection. It doesn't really do voice, etc - though I suppose Google's
> voice service is worth looking at - I bet it does not provide very many
> security properties that are useful for activists.
>
> As a point - Google really understands authentication and security
> though - so it's less likely that your account will get popped by some
> script kiddies.
>
> > In particular, I haven't seen a good outlines of how the Skype
> > protocol itself is compromised or could be (though there's a fair bit
> > of work on reverse-engineering it). The in-the-wild attacks on Skype
> > users I *have* heard all involve attacks that compromise the client
> > or obtain user passwords through malware. That combined with the
> > circumstantial evidence that of state-actors' apparent fury at Skype
> > for not providing intercept access would seem to point that it's not
> > *garbage* per se. Or at least make it hard to compellingly onvince
> > people to move off it.
> >
>
> You're certainly not alone but that does not make Skype secure. Issues
> like Tom Skype are perhaps the most well known and it seems to show
> evidence of a trend that is probably worth extrapolating.
>
> It also seems quite clear to me that Skype needs to prove that they are
> secure and the burden is not on us to prove it insecure. In any case,
> I'd love to link you to a serious architectural example. For example, if
> Skype uses a VBR codec, we know that this will have serious security
> ramifications:
> http://www.technologyreview.com/Infotech/20913/?a=f
> http://zfoneproject.com/faq.html#vbr
>
> And sure enough - Skype's use of a VBR codec means that even if their
> crypto isn't backdoored to high heaven, we have... bad news for users:
>
> "Skype's VBR codec leaks information
> regardless of the quality of the
> encryption, which may allow phrases to
> be identified with an accuracy of 50-90%"
>
> In summary - stop using Skype - it's closed source, proprietary garbage.
> Zfone is also non-free software but at least it's an open spec with
> people who absolutely refuse to backdoor or bugdoor their software.
>
> Seriously. If you do high risk work and you use Skype - you are probably
> putting people at risk - stop doing that!
>
> All the best,
> Jacob
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 19
> Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2011 21:35:40 -0600
> From: Hal Roberts <hroberts at cyber.law.harvard.edu>
> To: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> Cc: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Anchor Free
> Message-ID: <4D520B8C.1040207 at cyber.law.harvard.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> I don't think those are believable numbers.  On the face of it, it's
> really hard to believe.  Egypt only has about 17 million Internet users
> total.  I think hotspotshield has on the order of 1 million users
> worldwide.  AnchorFree has a habit of publishing very large usage
> numbers.  I suspect what they mean is that they had 1 million individual
> connections to their service over the last couple of weeks, which is
> obviously not at all the same as 1 million unique users, which is what
> most people would take away from their claim below.
>
> Here's a quick check to see whether there has been a massive upswelling
> of interest in hotspotshield in egypt:
>
>
> http://www.google.com/insights/search/#q=youtube%2Chotspot%20shield%2C&geo=EG&date=today%201-m&cmpt=q
>
> This compares search freq for 'youtube' (the 6th most popular search
> term in egypt) v. 'hotspotshield' for the last 30 days.  You can see a
> blip of increased interest in hss before the blackout, but 'youtube' is
> 79x more popular than 'hotspotshield' right through today.  It's very
> unlikely that 5% of the internet population quickly jumped onto the tool
> without more interest than that.
>
> -hal
>
> On 2/8/11 9:14 PM, Yosem Companys wrote:
> > Have you guys seen this?
> >
> > YC
> >
> >
> >
> > *SOURCE: AnchorFree*
> >
> > <http://www.anchorfree.com/>
> > Feb 08, 2011 11:00 ET
> >
> >
> >   Popular Privacy and Anti-Censorship Tool Sees Surge in Traffic as
> >   Egyptians Struggle to Stay Connected Online
> >
> >
> >     One Million Egyptians Access Censored Content With AnchorFree's
> >     Hotspot Shield, More Than 10 Times the Pre-Revolt Number
> >
> > MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA--(Marketwire - February 8, 2011) - In response to
> > their government's decision to curtail Internet communications,
> > Egyptians turned to technology that enables freedom to access censored
> > information. Masses of users in Egypt used technology solutions to
> > access blocked sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Google. The tools
> > have become one of the key technologies Egyptians have relied on to stay
> > connected, communicate with each other, coordinate protests and deliver
> > their messages to the world.
> >
> > AnchorFree, providers of the world's most popular free privacy tool
> > Hotspot Shield, witnessed a dramatic uptick in usage in the Middle East
> > as soon as the Egyptian government began blocking sites. Traffic surged
> > to ten times the average amount in Egypt, from 100,000 to one million
> > users, as Egyptians worked to rally together and share with the world
> > what was happening in their country.
> >
> > Over the past couple of years, Hotspot Shield has proven to be a
> > reliable way for people in countries like China and Tunisia to overcome
> > government censorship and maintain their privacy and anonymity while
> > using the Internet.
> >
> > "We created Hotspot Shield as a privacy tool to keep people secure from
> > hackers online and maintain their anonymity. It was never our intention
> > to have it serve as an anti-censorship tool, but in times like these, it
> > gives us great pride to know that people can use it to maintain free
> > speech," said the CEO of AnchorFree, David Gorodyansky. "Our spike in
> > traffic shows that one million Egyptians were able to access censored
> > content with the help of Hotspot Shield, despite government
> intervention."
> >
> > Traffic subsequently plummeted once the government shut down the
> > country's ISPs on January 27, initiating a five-day Internet blackout.
> > Despite this additional hurdle to free speech, citizens still managed to
> > access blocked Internet content by using dial-up services and turning on
> > Hotspot Shield.
> >
> > Hotspot Shield works by establishing a secure tunnel between a user's
> > computer and Internet connection, encrypting each user's entire Web
> > sessions to keep users protected. When users connect to Hotspot Shield
> > it encrypts every page they visit and makes them private online. In the
> > United States and Europe people use Hotspot Shield to secure their
> > browsing while at home and on Wi-Fi networks. In regions with
> > censorship, Hotspot Shield is used to enable complete freedom and
> > privacy online. Watch this video
> > <
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80179&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fbit.ly%2faWVY75%2b>
> to
> > learn more about how Hotspot Shield works.
> >
> > To download Hotspot Shield, visit: http://www.hotspotshield.com
> > <
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80182&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.hotspotshield.com
> >.
> > The program is free and will install automatically. Anyone having
> > problems accessing the site
> > <
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80185&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.hotspotshield.com>
> can
> > email win at afshield.com <mailto:win at afshield.com> or mac at afshield.com
> > <mailto:mac at afshield.com> to get a free version of the tool sent to them
> > directly. Hotspot Shield is available on all Windows operating systems,
> > as well as Mac OS X (10.6 Snow Leopard), Mac OS X (10.5 Leopard) and Mac
> > OS X (10.4 Tiger).
> >
> > *About AnchorFree
> > *AnchorFree enables millions of users globally to surf the Web freely
> > and securely through Hotspot Shield, the world's first and most popular
> > ad-supported virtual private network. More than 8.5 million monthly
> > users in 100 countries rely on Hotspot Shield to secure their Web
> > browsing experience, proliferating freedom of information online and
> > democratizing the Web. It is the only free way to ensure privacy and
> > total anonymity online on desktop computers, laptops and iPhones.
> > Hotspot Shield is powered by AnchorFree's proprietary communication
> > platform that enables marketers to distribute ad campaigns, messaging
> > and content to millions of users, totaling over two billion page views
> > every month. AnchorFree is a privately held venture backed Company and
> > is based in Mountain View, California. For more information or to
> > download Hotspot Shield, please visit www.anchorfree.com
> > <
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80188&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.anchorfree.com
> >.
> > The UK version of the tool, Expat Shield is available at
> > http://www.expatshield.com
> > <
> http://ctt.marketwire.com/?release=718037&id=80191&type=1&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.expatshield.com
> >.
> >
> > Media Contacts
> > LaunchSquad (for AnchorFree)
> > 415.625.8555
> > anchorfree(at)launchsquad(dot)com
> >
> > Back <http://www.marketwire.com/en/1392338>
> >
> > Privacy Statement <http://www.marketwire.com/mw/include.do?pageid=516> |
> > Terms of Service <http://www.marketwire.com/mw/include.do?pageid=476> |
> > Sitemap <http://www.marketwire.com/mw/include.do?pageid=517> |? 2011
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> > _______________________________________________
> > liberationtech mailing list
> > liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >
> > Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click
> above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily
> digest?"
> >
> > You will need the user name and password you receive from the list
> moderator in monthly reminders.
> >
> > Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list moderator.
> >
> > Please don't forget to follow us on http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 20
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 20:20:09 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Fwd: [liberation-techology] Liberation
>        Technology      Seminar Series- Feb 10, 2011
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTiko5QkVv2ghm8-X0tzQ=Eywxshh-e3cC5gC8mPR at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Michael sent the following email to the list, which seems to have bounced
> for some unexplained reason.  Here it is again.
>
> Best,
>
> YC
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Michael Gurstein <gurstein at gmail.com>
> Date: Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 1:27 PM
> Subject: RE: [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar Series-
> Feb 10,2011
> To: ciresearchers at vancouvercommunity.net,
> ci-research-sa at vancouvercommunity.net
> Cc: Kathleen Barcos <kbarcos at stanford.edu>,
> liberation-techology at lists.stanford.edu, CDDRL <
> cddrlresearchseminar at lists.stanford.edu>, Yosem Company <
> companys at stanford.edu>, Knight's Fellowship Program <degarcia at stanford.edu
> >,
> CSLI <allison at stanford.edu>, Ruth Kricheli <ruthk at stanford.edu>, Kelly
> Leigh
> Rosellen <rosellen at stanford.edu>
>
>
>  I could be wrong and if so I would be delighted to be corrected but is not
> the project described below precisely the problem with a solely mobile
> phone
> approach to ICT for D.
>
> What I understand from the below is that the system described provides a
> means for individual cell phone users (those with the financial resources
> to
> own and use a cell phone for this purpose) to acquire information that will
> be of value to them as individuals (and their families) i.e. "information
> about water availability, price, and quality".
>
> This information will presumably assist the individual system user to
> respond effectively to the problem of clean water in Kibera but will do
> little if anything (in fact perhaps even undermining) the only means by
> which the problem could be resolved for the mass (millions) of those living
> in the slum which is a collective and community response to ensure that the
> means are put in place for all to have access to clean water; and not
> simply
> those who are privileged whether by locality or by their access to ICTs and
> this particular ICT app.
>
> Best,
>
> Mike
> http://www.realitysandwich.com/egypt_transform_social_media
>
> Michael Gurstein, Ph.D.
> Director: Centre for Community Informatics Research, Development and
> Training (CCIRDT)
> Vancouver, CANADA
> http://www.communityinformatics.net
>
> Cape Town, SA (in conjunction with Izandla Zethu SA)
> http://www.izandlazethu.co.za/
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> *From:* liberation-techology-bounces at lists.stanford.edu [mailto:
> liberation-techology-bounces at lists.stanford.edu] *On Behalf Of *Kathleen
> Barcos
> *Sent:* Tuesday, February 08, 2011 1:07 PM
> *To:* liberation-techology at lists.stanford.edu; CDDRL; Yosem Company;
> Knight's Fellowship Program; CSLI; Ruth Kricheli; Kelly Leigh Rosellen
> *Subject:* [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar Series- Feb
> 10,2011
>
>
>  [image: Program on Liberation Technology]
>  Can ICT Improve Clean Water Delivery Systems in Slums? Lessons from
> Kibera
> *CDDRL, PGJ, Program on Liberation Technology Seminar Series*
>
> Date and Time
> February 10, 2011
> 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
>
> Locatiion
> Wallenberg Theater
> Bldg 160
> Stanford University
>
>  Speakers
> *Katherine Hoffman* - International Policy Studies, M.A. Candidate,Global
> Health concentration at Stanford University
> *Sunny Jeon* - Ph.D. Candidate,Political Science at Stanford University
>
> *Abstract
> *Water is scarce, costly, and contaminated in Kibera, Nairobi -- one of
> Africa's largest urban slums. On good days, the women and children spend
> just under an hour finding clean water in their community. On bad days, the
> price of water increases tenfold and the search takes all day. Often,
> people
> ask jokingly whether it is water or cholera they are buying.
>
> Many slums like Kibera lack access to clean drinking water, but they don't
> lack access to mobile phones. This is the insight behind M-Maji, a start-up
> non-profit project that uses mobile phones to empower communities with
> better information about water availability, price, and quality. This
> seminar will introduce the M-Maji system, and describe some of the
> challenges to designing for such a complex social environment.Background:
> M-Maji emerged from the Designing Liberation Technologies course in the
> Stanford d.school, which focused on using mobile phone technology for
> health
> improvement in Kibera. M-Maji has since received funding to run a pilot
> from
> the Program on Liberation Technologies and the Center on Philanthropy and
> Civil Society at Stanford
>
> *Sunny Jeon* is the principal investigator to M-Maji research, and is
> currently making frequent trips to Kenya to prepare for a randomized impact
> evaluation of their water program. He is also a Ph.D. Candidate in the
> Stanford Department of Political Science, where he is working on a
> dissertation project that studies the economic and political returns to
> ethnic diversity.
>
> *Katherine Hoffman* is a co-terminal student completing a B.A. in
> International Relations and Economics and an M.A. in International Policy
> Studies with a focus on Global Health. She has been involved with M-Maji
> since it began in Spring quarter, and has just returned from a trip to
> Kenya
> in December to begin laying the groundwork for the project implementation.
> Her primary interests include economic development and health improvement
> in
> low-resource settings. Past experience includes internships at the Bonn
> International Center for Conversion in Bonn, Germany and at the Institute
> for Financial Management in Chennai, India; she has also volunteered at the
> Center for the Working Girl in Quito, Ecuador and studied abroad for a
> quarter in Moscow.
> -------------- next part --------------
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 21
> Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 21:04:06 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <ycompanys at gmail.com>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Could someone confirm if they receive this
>        via the list?
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTimhw9Uss5J4v1rJ+6d-_He0TQ5PMymizcOEzj6e at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Michael seems to be having problems posting the message below, and I cannot
> access it via the admin interface. Can someone confirm if they receive
> this/my message?  Apologies if the message has been posted before.
>
> Thx,
>
> Yosem
>
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 1:27 PM, Michael Gurstein <gurstein at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > I could be wrong and if so I would be delighted to be corrected but is
> not
> > the project described below re: "Can ICT Improve Clean Water Delivery
> > Systems in Slums? Lessons from Kibera" precisely the problem with a
> solely
> > mobile phone approach to ICT for D.
> >
> > What I understand from the below is that the system described provides a
> > means for individual cell phone users (those with the financial resources
> to
> > own and use a cell phone for this purpose) to acquire information that
> will
> > be of value to them as individuals (and their families) i.e. "information
> > about water availability, price, and quality".
> >
> > This information will presumably assist the individual system user to
> > respond effectively to the problem of clean water in Kibera but will do
> > little if anything (in fact perhaps even undermining) the only means by
> > which the problem could be resolved for the mass (millions) of those
> living
> > in the slum which is a collective and community response to ensure that
> the
> > means are put in place for all to have access to clean water; and not
> simply
> > those who are privileged whether by locality or by their access to ICTs
> and
> > this particular ICT app.
> >
> > Best,
> >
> > Mike
> > http://www.realitysandwich.com/egypt_transform_social_media
> >
> > Michael Gurstein, Ph.D.
> > Director: Centre for Community Informatics Research, Development and
> > Training (CCIRDT)
> > Vancouver, CANADA
> > http://www.communityinformatics.net
> >
> > Cape Town, SA (in conjunction with Izandla Zethu SA)
> > http://www.izandlazethu.co.za/
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > *From:* liberation-techology-bounces at lists.stanford.edu [mailto:
> > liberation-techology-bounces at lists.stanford.edu] *On Behalf Of *Kathleen
> > Barcos
> > *Sent:* Tuesday, February 08, 2011 1:07 PM
> > *To:* liberation-techology at lists.stanford.edu; CDDRL; Yosem Company;
> > Knight's Fellowship Program; CSLI; Ruth Kricheli; Kelly Leigh Rosellen
> > *Subject:* [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar Series-
> > Feb 10,2011
> >
> >
> > [image: Program on Liberation Technology]
> >
> >
> -------------- next part --------------
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 22
> Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2011 00:17:50 -0500
> From: Kevin Donovan <kdonovan11 at gmail.com>
> To: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> Cc: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Fwd: [liberation-techology] Liberation
>        Technology Seminar Series- Feb 10, 2011
> Message-ID:
>        <AANLkTikcuGm1J2bHocuyorfSJ5_1JTxmdpYJrG5e2-jr at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> There is more information about the project here:
> http://mmaji.wordpress.com/m-maji/
>
> As I understand it, it aims to decrease information asymmetries in the same
> manner as other virtual marketplaces like CellBazaar in Bangladesh or
> Manobi
> and Esoko for agricultural products. This time, it's just aimed exclusively
> at water in Kibera.
>
> The possibility that it will exclude the very poorest is likely, given that
> mobile ownership is still exclusionary, but I'm more sanguine than some
> that
> increased information symmetry in a market has effects that do not likely
> include undermining collective action.
>
> As a contrast, consider the Katitika Water Project that seeks to create
> sustainable and safe water through the use of M-PESA. This project brings a
> whole host of additional considerations, including routing drinking water
> through a proprietary standard.
>
> PR:
>
> http://www.safaricom.co.ke/fileadmin/M-PESA/Documents/Press_release/Partnership-Grundfos-rural-water-provision.pdf
>
> Briefly surveyed here:
>
> http://www.mobileactive.org/research/community-level-economic-effects-m-pesa-kenya-initial-findings
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 11:20 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
> >wrote:
>
> > Michael sent the following email to the list, which seems to have bounced
> > for some unexplained reason.  Here it is again.
> >
> > Best,
> >
> > YC
> >
> > ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> > From: Michael Gurstein <gurstein at gmail.com>
> > Date: Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 1:27 PM
> > Subject: RE: [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar Series-
> > Feb 10,2011
> > To: ciresearchers at vancouvercommunity.net,
> > ci-research-sa at vancouvercommunity.net
> > Cc: Kathleen Barcos <kbarcos at stanford.edu>,
> > liberation-techology at lists.stanford.edu, CDDRL <
> > cddrlresearchseminar at lists.stanford.edu>, Yosem Company <
> > companys at stanford.edu>, Knight's Fellowship Program <
> degarcia at stanford.edu>,
> > CSLI <allison at stanford.edu>, Ruth Kricheli <ruthk at stanford.edu>, Kelly
> > Leigh Rosellen <rosellen at stanford.edu>
> >
> >
> >  I could be wrong and if so I would be delighted to be corrected but is
> > not the project described below precisely the problem with a solely
> mobile
> > phone approach to ICT for D.
> >
> > What I understand from the below is that the system described provides a
> > means for individual cell phone users (those with the financial resources
> to
> > own and use a cell phone for this purpose) to acquire information that
> will
> > be of value to them as individuals (and their families) i.e. "information
> > about water availability, price, and quality".
> >
> > This information will presumably assist the individual system user to
> > respond effectively to the problem of clean water in Kibera but will do
> > little if anything (in fact perhaps even undermining) the only means by
> > which the problem could be resolved for the mass (millions) of those
> living
> > in the slum which is a collective and community response to ensure that
> the
> > means are put in place for all to have access to clean water; and not
> simply
> > those who are privileged whether by locality or by their access to ICTs
> and
> > this particular ICT app.
> >
> > Best,
> >
> > Mike
> > http://www.realitysandwich.com/egypt_transform_social_media
> >
> > Michael Gurstein, Ph.D.
> > Director: Centre for Community Informatics Research, Development and
> > Training (CCIRDT)
> > Vancouver, CANADA
> > http://www.communityinformatics.net
> >
> > Cape Town, SA (in conjunction with Izandla Zethu SA)
> > http://www.izandlazethu.co.za/
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > *From:* liberation-techology-bounces at lists.stanford.edu [mailto:
> > liberation-techology-bounces at lists.stanford.edu] *On Behalf Of *Kathleen
> > Barcos
> > *Sent:* Tuesday, February 08, 2011 1:07 PM
> > *To:* liberation-techology at lists.stanford.edu; CDDRL; Yosem Company;
> > Knight's Fellowship Program; CSLI; Ruth Kricheli; Kelly Leigh Rosellen
> > *Subject:* [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar Series-
> > Feb 10,2011
> >
> >
> >  [image: Program on Liberation Technology]
> >  Can ICT Improve Clean Water Delivery Systems in Slums? Lessons from
> > Kibera
> > *CDDRL, PGJ, Program on Liberation Technology Seminar Series*
> >
> > Date and Time
> > February 10, 2011
> > 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
> >
> > Locatiion
> > Wallenberg Theater
> > Bldg 160
> > Stanford University
> >
> >  Speakers
> > *Katherine Hoffman* - International Policy Studies, M.A. Candidate,Global
> > Health concentration at Stanford University
> > *Sunny Jeon* - Ph.D. Candidate,Political Science at Stanford University
> >
> > *Abstract
> > *Water is scarce, costly, and contaminated in Kibera, Nairobi -- one of
> > Africa's largest urban slums. On good days, the women and children spend
> > just under an hour finding clean water in their community. On bad days,
> the
> > price of water increases tenfold and the search takes all day. Often,
> people
> > ask jokingly whether it is water or cholera they are buying.
> >
> > Many slums like Kibera lack access to clean drinking water, but they
> don't
> > lack access to mobile phones. This is the insight behind M-Maji, a
> start-up
> > non-profit project that uses mobile phones to empower communities with
> > better information about water availability, price, and quality. This
> > seminar will introduce the M-Maji system, and describe some of the
> > challenges to designing for such a complex social environment.Background:
> > M-Maji emerged from the Designing Liberation Technologies course in the
> > Stanford d.school, which focused on using mobile phone technology for
> health
> > improvement in Kibera. M-Maji has since received funding to run a pilot
> from
> > the Program on Liberation Technologies and the Center on Philanthropy and
> > Civil Society at Stanford
> >
> > *Sunny Jeon* is the principal investigator to M-Maji research, and is
> > currently making frequent trips to Kenya to prepare for a randomized
> impact
> > evaluation of their water program. He is also a Ph.D. Candidate in the
> > Stanford Department of Political Science, where he is working on a
> > dissertation project that studies the economic and political returns to
> > ethnic diversity.
> >
> > *Katherine Hoffman* is a co-terminal student completing a B.A. in
> > International Relations and Economics and an M.A. in International Policy
> > Studies with a focus on Global Health. She has been involved with M-Maji
> > since it began in Spring quarter, and has just returned from a trip to
> Kenya
> > in December to begin laying the groundwork for the project
> implementation.
> > Her primary interests include economic development and health improvement
> > in low-resource settings. Past experience includes internships at the
> Bonn
> > International Center for Conversion in Bonn, Germany and at the Institute
> > for Financial Management in Chennai, India; she has also volunteered at
> the
> > Center for the Working Girl in Quito, Ecuador and studied abroad for a
> > quarter in Moscow.
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > liberationtech mailing list
> > liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> >
> > Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
> >
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > If you would like to receive a daily digest, click "yes" (once you click
> > above) next to "would you like to receive list mail batched in a daily
> > digest?"
> >
> > You will need the user name and password you receive from the list
> > moderator in monthly reminders.
> >
> > Should you need immediate assistance, please contact the list moderator.
> >
> > Please don't forget to follow us on http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Kevin Donovan
> Georgetown '11: SFS
> 630.849.8285
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> liberationtech mailing list
> liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>
> Should you need to change your subscription options, please go to:
>
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
> Please don't forget to follow us on http://twitter.com/#!/Liberationtech
>
> End of liberationtech Digest, Vol 48, Issue 2
> *********************************************
>



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