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[liberationtech] China Jasmine Revolution

Graham Webster gwebster at uw.edu
Sun Feb 20 13:53:07 PST 2011


Hi everyone,

There was an interesting (probably satirical) blogpost circulated on the China civil society list recently, and I decided it was worth translating. It's written in the voice of an innocent student who stumbled upon the Beijing McDonalds gathering and was perplexed by the police behavior. Wan Yanhai, who posted it to C-CIVSOC, gave it the title "Police leading Jasmine Revolution in Beijing". Link to full post with images. Rough translated portion below.

http://transpacifica.net/2011/02/21/police-led-protests-satire-and-the-jasmine-revolution/

The new term was about to start and our teacher sent out a memorization assignment [前赤壁赋/qiancibishu, a work from the Northern Song dynasty that I don't know anything about]. I tried to do the memorization in a quiet place, but made awful progress. I wondered if it would go better at Wangfujing [a major commercial street in Beijing].

I was just studying in front of McDonalds, and unable to concentrate, I realized several police cars and some police officers had shown up. Then, out of the crowd came a team of people [police] who suddenly dispersed, some standing nearby and others at a distance.

I tried my best to concentrate, but soon there arrived a group of photographers.

Later, more people came and stood at the door of the McDonalds, and quite a few more police showed up. The police presence gradually grew, and the crowd gradually dispersed.

When I left, I noticed that the police at the perimeter had moved closer.

What was happening? I took a few pictures.

(All of these pictures can be downloaded at Picasa)

Why would people stop to watch an unusual number of police? The People’s Police love the people; the people love the People’s Police? [This I believe is a play on a slogan.] When I was taking pictures, someone hit me in the head. How could whoever did this be so audacious as to attack people [renmin] in front of almost 100 police. And how could the People’s Police turn a blind eye?

If you know the truth, please don’t say it. Let people live with their illusions.


--
Graham Webster | 魏光明
Ph.D. student, Political Science
University of Washington
http://gwbstr.com
g at gwbstr.com

On Feb 20, 2011, at 4:17 AM, feng37 wrote:

> Thanks, will do. Personally I find it more interesting that so many people were willing to entertain the possibility, however slight, that what happened in Tunisia (or Egypt) could conceivably take place in China. Hope, not belief, so I say jarring in response to the tone of the post from the headline down, how the author notes that the protests were nipped in the bud through arrests and aggressive censorship and then finds the Beijing protest turnout 'ridiculous', as if that were the fault of those who showed up.
> 
> In fact, comments yesterday from Stainless Steel Mouse (@liudimouse) and Mo Zhixu (@mozhixu) and others already sought to base today's outcome on its 'performance art' aspect. Contrary to apparent assumptions in this post below, discussions on Twitter bore little expectation that a large-scale revolution would be born today in China. There were a number of comments directly mentioning China's massive 'stability office' budget, as well as questions regarding how much police mobilization today would end up costing taxpayers.
> 
> As for the motivation of the protests, I wouldn't call it a foregone conclusion that demands for greater freedom and transparency cannot find popular support in China, suppression or not. There also seems to be an underlying assumption in the post that it is absurd that such a small and vulnerable group would put themselves at such great risk. OK, strictly speaking, but doesn't reflect what I saw of debates on Twitter yesterday and today.
> 
> The risks in using Twitter to be transparent in spreading information like the locations and time of this protest and others must seem to be an acceptable trade-off in exchange for relatively unfettered access to uncensored discussions with like-minded people, and lack of a better alternative. Perhaps fortunately, on the lowest common denominator side, one of the most popular Twitter clients in China 'sensitive keyword' (https://tuite.im/) was blocked yesterday. I say fortunately because little is known about who developed or maintains it, who has access to users' passwords, etc.
> 
> On Sun, Feb 20, 2011 at 6:33 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
> Thanks for sharing, Feng.  We'd love to hear your perspective.  Thanks.  
> 
> PS  Please make sure you're using Tor to anonymize your net access.
> 
> 
> On Sun, Feb 20, 2011 at 2:29 AM, feng37 <dxzine at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi, newcomer to the list (@feng37 on Twitter). Thanks for sharing, it's quite jarring to see this kind of triumphalism over the fact that the protests were effectively squashed.
> 
> On Sun, Feb 20, 2011 at 4:58 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
> The Revolution That Wasn’t
> February 20, 2011
> By C. Custer
> 
> http://chinageeks.org/2011/02/the-revolution-that-wasnt/
> Late last night, I noticed that calls for large protests in several major Chinese cities were circulating on Twitter. Using the hashtag #cn220, users were reposting information from the overseas Chinese website Boxun, where an anonymous user had called for a Chinese “Jasmine Revolution.” This morning, those reports were mixed with reports that police and the military had already begun to form up in the locations designated for protest around the country. Naturally, I decided it would be a good idea to grab a camera and head to the Wangfujing area, where Beijing’s protest was supposed to happen.
> 
> I should note that I didn’t actually expect to find much. This news was being passed around almost exclusively on websites blocked in China, and many of the people making tweets seemed to be making them from outside China. There were people announcing that China’s jasmine revolution had begun at 11 in the morning, three hours before the protests were even supposed to start. But very few Chinese people had even heard about it, and many of the Chinese twitter users I follow said they had already been threatened, detained, or otherwise instructed not to go by police or Party authorities.
> 
> When we arrived, around 1:40, there was already a small group of people clustered around the entrance to McDonalds, the area designated online as the center of the protest. Most of them were carrying expensive photo or video cameras, and it was clear that a good percentage of the crowd was journalists.
> 
> I met up with a couple foreign correspondents I happen to know who had arrived slightly before me. We joked for a little whole about the “revolutionary” atmosphere, or lack thereof, and the ridiculousness of the growing crowd of people, photographing itself. Of course, we were also participants.
> 
> A little after 2pm, the crowd reached its largest, perhaps two or three hundred people, although there were people coming and leaving all the time because Wangfujing is naturally a fairly busy place. Aside from one moment, where we could see a bouquet of flowers fly above the heads of the center of the crowd–perhaps they were jasmine flowers?–I saw nothing at any point that could be considered protesting. No one shouted slogans, no one held signs, it was just a group of people standing around photographing each other.
> 
> Of course, the crowd drew an increasingly heavy police presence, and they herded people around the area for more than an hour before managing to more or less clear the place out. At one point, they drove everyone from in front of the McDonalds, so the crowd moved along the building’s side, blocking the road there, at which point the police herded everyone back in front of the McDonalds.
> 
> For the most part, the police showed surprising restraint, at least for Chinese cops. I saw no incidents of violence, although I did overhear an argument between a citizen and a police officer who had confiscated the man’s cell phone, and I did personally get into a shouting match with a police officer who shoved me. There were other reports of roughhousing, but nothing more than a bit of shoving and pushing.
> 
> After an hour or so, we left. There were still some people hanging around, but it was clear that everyone was waiting to see what would happen and no one was going to actually do anything. Even the police were getting bored. As we left, we passed a large group of them and overheard their commander say “Back to normal!” As we walked down the stairs and into the subway station, they piled into their vans and began to drive away.
> 
> It’s clear that if change will come to China, it will come from within. A revolution cannot be hoped or tweeted into existence by overseas Chinese, or overzealous Twitter fans drunk off their so-called victories in North Africa.
> 
> As a side note, I continue to marvel at the Beijing police’s ability to take nothing and turn it into an incident. Had they not come out in such large numbers and not tried to force people to leave, I suspect this would have been an even smaller “protest”.
> 
> 
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