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[liberationtech] Lead designer position at samasource

S Vivek vivekdse at gmail.com
Wed Mar 16 09:11:48 PDT 2011


Here is a job posting that would be of interest to the Lib Tech community.

Vivek

Subject: Re: [liberation-techology] Liberation Technology Seminar Series-
March 10  Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 12:36:41 -0800  From: Leila Chirayath Janah
<leila.chirayath at post.harvard.edu> <leila.chirayath at post.harvard.edu>
To: Kathleen
Barcos <kbarcos at stanford.edu> <kbarcos at stanford.edu>  CC: Ian Terrell
<ian at samasource.org> <ian at samasource.org>

Hi Kathleen,

 Any chance we could post a job for a lead designer to the libtech group? JD
below and here: http://www.samasource.org/about/positions/LeadDesigner. $10K
referral bonus!

 All best,
Leila

  Lead Designer

*San Francisco CA*

You're a strong designer who wants to lead, influence, learn and grow, and
better the world.

If you work with us, your primary responsibility will be owning the full
user experience of our web application, a distributed work platform similar
to Amazon Mechanical Turk but targeting impoverished workers in developing
economies.  Owning the experience means designing the look and feel, of
course, but also creating intuitive page flows and adding "design thinking"
to our process.  As it is, we're a team of developers and product people
focused on features: we need you to be the voice of our users.

We need that voice on the product side immediately, but there are many other
areas in the organization that could use a designer's hand, and you'll have
access to all of them.  That includes our sales-focused dot-com site, our
organization-focused dot-org site, our pitch decks and sales collateral --
even the letterhead and email signature if you're into those sorts of
things.  The position will really be what you make it, and while we
naturally want to see a solid portfolio, we're similarly focused on finding
someone who's a fast learner and an aggressive starter and who doesn't seek
permission before making things better.

Since the position has such freedom attached to it, we'd like to start with
a 90-day contract and convert to full time employment if we're all happy.
 That strategy, and everything else you see here, is negotiable: if you
think you'll be a great fit for Samasource, we want to hear from you no
matter what.

*Referral Bonus!*
If you don't happen to think you'll be a great fit, but you know someone who
just may be, please send this post along to them!  If we hire them, we'll
hook you up with an iPad.
 About Us: Samasource is a social enterprise that connects people living in
poverty to work via the internet. To get a quick overview of what we do,
watch this 50 second video on YouTube of two of our workers:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96bSBNRCSoQ. Then watch the suggested videos
on the right, and if that's not enough, watch the 9 minute TEDx talk our
founder gave:  http://vimeo.com/9305118.

 Responsibilities:

   - Take ownership of the user experience of our distributed work platform
   - Redesign and rebrand samasource.com <http://www.samasource.com/> and
   samasource.org <http://www.samasource.org/>
   - Work collaboratively and add value to team interactions
   - Learn and grow and improve your skills and the skills of the team

 Things we know you'll need:

   - A desire to make the world a better place
   - A passion for delighting users
   - A willingness to expand your knowledge and skills
   - Eligibility to work in the U.S.

 Things we think you might need:

   - Strong knowledge of HTML and CSS
   - A pragmatic combination of skills in design, UI, UX, information
   architecture, typography, iconography
   - Experience working with web applications and dynamic frameworks like
   Ruby on Rails

  To Apply: Please submit your resume, a cover letter, and your portfolio
to The Resumator<http://samasource.theresumator.com/apply/FM9zBf/FrontEnd-Designer.html>
.


Leila Chirayath Janah
www.samasource.org | www.leilajanah.com
+1 917 856 9933 | @leila_c



On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 10:38 AM, Kathleen Barcos <kbarcos at stanford.edu>wrote:

>  [image: Program on Liberation TEchnology]
>  The Digital Origins of
> Dictatorship and Democracy
> *CDDRL, PGJ, Program on Liberation Technology Seminar Series*
>
> *Date and Time*
> March 10, 2011
> 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM
>
> *Location*
> Wallenberg Theater
> Wallenberg Hall
> 450 Serra Mall, Building 160
> Stanford, Ca 94305-2055
>
>
>
>   Speaker
> *Dr. Philip N. Howard* - Associate Professor of Information, Communication
> and International Studies at University of Washington
>
>     *Abstract
> *Do new information technologies advance democratization?  Among the
> diverse countries with large Muslim communities, how do such technologies
> provide capacities and constraints on institutional change?  What are the
> ingredients of the modern recipe for democratic transition or democratic
> entrenchment?  Around the developing world, political leaders face a
> dilemma: the very information and communication technologies that boost
> economic fortunes also undermine power structures. Globally, one in ten
> internet users is a Muslim living in a populous Muslim community. In these
> countries, young people are developing their political identities-including
> a transnational Muslim identity-online. In countries where political parties
> are illegal, the internet is the only infrastructure for democratic
> discourse. And in countries with large Muslim communities, mobile phones and
> the internet are helping civil society build systems of political
> communication independent of the state and beyond easy manipulation by
> cultural or religious elites.  With evidence from fieldwork in Azerbaijan,
> Egypt, Tajikistan and Tanzania, and using the latest fuzzy-set statistical
> models, I demonstrate  that communications technologies have played a
> crucial role in advancing democracy in Muslim countries. Certainly, no
> democratic transition has occurred solely because of the internet. But, as I
> argue, no democratic transition can occur today without the internet. In the
> last 15 years, technology diffusion trends have contributed to clear
> political outcomes, and digital media have become a key ingredient in the
> modern recipe for democratization.
>
> *Philip N. Howard* is associate professor of communication, information
> and international studies at the University of Washington.  His books
> include New Media Campaigns and the Managed Citizen (Cambridge, 2005) and
> The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (Oxford, 2011).
> Currently, he directs the NSF-funded Project on Information Technology and
> Political Islam (www.pitpi.org).
>
> _______________________________________________
> liberation-techology mailing list
> liberation-techology at lists.stanford.edu
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberation-techology
>
>



-- 
http://viveks.info
Phone: 1-801-784-8357, that is 1-801-S Vivek's!
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