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[liberationtech] Silent Circle Dangerous to Cryptography Software Development

Robert Guerra rguerra at privaterra.org
Thu Oct 11 11:41:52 PDT 2012


Eric King btw is the name of the person who is the head of research at Privacy International. 

https://www.privacyinternational.org/people/eric-king

Eric is head of research at Privacy International, where he runs the Big Brother Incorporated project, an investigation of the international trade in surveillance technologies. His work focuses on the intersection of human rights, privacy and technology. He is the secret prisons technical adviser at Reprieve, is on the advisory council of the Foundation for Information Policy Research and holds a degree in law from the London School of Economics.

regards


--
R. Guerra
Phone/Cell: +1 202-905-2081
Twitter: twitter.com/netfreedom 
Email: rguerra at privaterra.org

On 2012-10-11, at 2:36 PM, Julian Oliver wrote:

> 
> ..on Thu, Oct 11, 2012 at 02:24:54PM -0400, Nadim Kobeissi wrote:
>> 
>> The closed-source nature of the software makes pushing
>> government-mandated backdoors incredibly easy and extremely difficult to
>> detect if done right. This is a tall claim not backed by evidence or the
>> possibility of review.
> 
> A chap on Twitter by the name of Eric King wrote that "I don't have a URL yet
> but Phil said yesterday he was releasing the source code."
> 
> In any case, even with the source (including server-side) it is unclear as to
> whether protection is not compromised by this suite. 
> 
> With a credit-card payment system the client list is practically a click away
> for any Government client, itself a worry.  Having the servers located on
> Canadian soil garners little, I think: software in a position like this
> configures the distributor under responsibility to the juristiction in which its
> business is registered whilst foreign governments become potential clients. 
> 
> Ultimately software promising this level of privacy needs to reflect that people
> come from differing geo-political contexts. As such both client and server needs
> to be freely distributed and installable such that communities can then manage
> their own communication needs, taking risks within their techno-political
> context as they see fit.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> -- 
> Julian Oliver
> http://julianoliver.com
> http://criticalengineering.org
> --
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