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[liberationtech] Wickr app aims to safeguard online privacy

Brian Conley brianc at smallworldnews.tv
Tue Feb 5 13:13:51 PST 2013


Just to clarify, are you suggesting such a feature would put the users at
*greater* threat?

in my experience simply using CryptoTool™ puts you at risk of
interrogation, torture, prison in certain countries. It seems that such a
feature would mitigate. On the other hand, it seems like splitting hairs,
until research is done, to suggest such a feature would be better than
simply keeping all messages encrypted at rest.

Once we are talking about rubber hose decryption methods, I think we've
kind of already lost, no?

B

On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 12:46 PM, Nadim Kobeissi <nadim at nadim.cc> wrote:

>
>
>
> NK
>
>
> On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 3:06 PM, Brian Conley <brianc at smallworldnews.tv>wrote:
>
>> In this case, self-destruct would potentially save Joe and Susan from the
>> "fool" Billy's lazy security culture.
>>
>
> In this kind of scenario, adding a self-destruct feature would definitely
> be useful in preventing communications from leaking through certain vectors
> after the messages have served their purpose.
>
> However, they also shift the threat. If Authoritarianstan police know that
> CryptoToolX deletes messages after a while, they are likely to feel more
> justified in further interrogating the suspect, knowing that if the
> messages aren't there now, it's likely that they were there earlier.
>
> It's hard to discuss those features not because they aren't cool and
> useful (they are!) but because they make it difficult to maintain a sense
> of priority. Measuring how a feature will help, how it'll change the threat
> and whether it will eclipse attention from greater threats and concerns is
> kind of trick AFAICT.
>
>
>>
>> Certainly this is not a be all and and all, but does seem like a
>> potentially valuable feature based on my own broad observation of "fools"
>> amongst many activist and journalist groups.
>>
>> Brian
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 11:11 AM, Jacob Appelbaum <jacob at appelbaum.net>wrote:
>>
>>> Brian Conley:
>>> > Apparently Silent Circle is also proposing such a feature now.
>>>
>>> Such a feature makes sense when we consider the pervasive world of
>>> targeted attacks. If you compromise say, my email client today, you may
>>> get years of email. If you compromise my Pond client today, you get a
>>> weeks worth of messages. Such a feature is something I think is useful
>>> and I agreed to it when I started using Pond. It is a kind of forward
>>> secrecy that understands that attackers sometimes win but you'd like
>>> them to not win everything for all time.
>>>
>>> Seems rather reasonable, really. Hardly malware but hardly perfect.
>>>
>>> All the best,
>>> Jake
>>>
>>> --
>>> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password at:
>>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> Brian Conley
>>
>> Director, Small World News
>>
>> http://smallworldnews.tv
>>
>> m: 646.285.2046
>>
>> Skype: brianjoelconley
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password at:
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>>
>
>
> --
> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password at:
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>



-- 



Brian Conley

Director, Small World News

http://smallworldnews.tv

m: 646.285.2046

Skype: brianjoelconley
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