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[liberationtech] Email privacy

scarp scarp at tormail.org
Tue Jan 29 19:57:08 PST 2013


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André Rebentisch:
> The analogy was entering a house without permission because the
> locker (as all lockers) is unsafe or the door isn't closed.
> 

Yes and if you woke up and someone was in your living room, you'd be
like "wtf" are you doing in my house!. If someone accessed a gmail
sever to spy on you, you'd never know, and there probably wouldn't be
a warrant either because requests under the "protection of national
security" usually include a gag order.

>> Over time people's perceptions of privacy will and have changed.
>> This means they are less outraged by proposed draconian laws,
>> assuming things continue down the same path as they have so far.
> 
> 25 years ago mass surveillance of telecommunications was still
> very common. I can't believe in aggravation.
> 
> DPR IMCO 148 is a quite interesting amendment, carried by the
> Internal Market Committee (IMCO) recently 
> http://parltrack.euwiki.org/dossier/2012/0011%28COD%29#am-148-PE-500.411
>
>  "on condition that no personal data are made accessible to an
> indefinite number of people;"
> 

That might be a nice law for the EU, but for data placed on US servers
does it apply? I remember reading a while back about conflict between
the Patriot Act and EU data privacy laws.

http://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/news/2162386/europe-s-protection-laws-cause-conflict-warn-legal-experts

>> If you put your data on someone else's servers then there is
>> always the possibility that they can hand it over, either legally
>> or illegally.
> 
> I am not saying that you share these views but it is a pattern:
> First persons muse about raising security/privacy (levels), and
> when data was not kept secure/private they say, it's public anyway
> and we won't respect your data sovereignty. Or the attitude: when
> you store your mails with gmail then you *deserve* that a foreign
> government dares to read your mails.  Analogy: When I lock my door
> and you could still get in with a picklock then you'd also enjoy
> the right to enter my house because my locker was unsecure.

That's also legal in some parts of the world:

> Police are allowed in some circumstances to install hidden
> surveillance cameras on private property without obtaining a search
> warrant, a federal judge said yesterday.
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2953157/posts

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/10/fbi-tracking-device/

> 
> For the EU single market our Cloud services have to be under our 
> jurisdiction or third nations guarantee to refrain from infringing
> our data privacy. Data protection laws provide sanctions, design
> principles, practices, institutions. Fortunately the European Union
> has the gravity to raise global standards.
> 
> See: http://protectmydata.eu/
> 
> Best, André
> 

and hopefully they do, because there's a number of countries
considering global surveillance schemes. One in particular is
Australia with their National Security Inquiry.

http://www.abc.net.au/technology/articles/2012/09/28/3599864.htm

- -- 
scarp
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