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[liberationtech] FT: Companies scramble for consumer data (personal data are so cheap... why bother to protect them)

Catherine Roy ecrire at catherine-roy.net
Sat Jun 15 14:43:41 PDT 2013


Two links that may be of interest to this discussion.

First, a recent report from the OECD: "Exploring the Economics of 
Personal Data", March 2013. This report looks at the different 
methodologies for measuring the monetary value of personal data:

<http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset-Management/oecd/science-and-technology/exploring-the-economics-of-personal-data_5k486qtxldmq-en>

Second, everyone here is probably familiar with Hasan Elahi, who decided 
to make his life very public after being signaled out by the FBI post 
9-11. His TED talk from 2011 (some interesting thoughts at around 11 
minutes):

http://www.ted.com/talks/hasan_elahi.html

Best regards,


Catherine

-- 
Catherine Roy
http://www.catherine-roy.net



On 15/06/2013 1:32 PM, Alfonso De Gregorio wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 15, 2013 at 8:59 PM, Andrés Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes
> <alps6085 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I truly believe "Internet Privacy" is an oxymoron. Therefore, any and
>> all attempts to "protect it" are doomed from the start. It's just like
>> "copyright" in the movie industry. Why not reverse the argument and
>> make "privacy" irrelevant, with zero economic value? Since the wheels
>> of industry are financial, industry will fail to profit from it.
>> Best Regards | Cordiales Saludos | Grato,
> There is a market value for personal information (i.e., demand side)
> and there is a value of privacy to the individual the information
> belongs to (i.e., supply side).
> As long as privacy will be worth something to people -- for reasons
> that goes beyond the realms of economic reasoning --  its value will
> be (inevitably) non-zero.
>
>> Andrés L. Pacheco Sanfuentes
>> <alps at acm.org>
>> +1 (817) 271-9619
> Cheers,
> Alfonso
>
>> On Sat, Jun 15, 2013 at 11:51 AM, Alfonso De Gregorio <adg at crypto.lo.gy> wrote:
>>> On Sat, Jun 15, 2013 at 7:24 PM, ale fernandez <skoria at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> With all this talk of how snooping agencies and companies are trading people's data, wouldn't a citizen aggregated and voluntary free / creative commons database or similar be of value - perhaps at least as a way of reducing the value of all these data mining companies?
>>>>
>>>> Ale
>>> Such self-exposure may sounds kind of personal-data pornography -- and
>>> somebody might argue that it wouldn't be so different than disclosing
>>> our life to a random peer on a social media site.
>>>
>>> More seriously, if we believe there is value in privacy, we shouldn't
>>> erode our own privacy as modern privacy-kamikaze just to destroy
>>> personal information market value. Let's play to win!
>>>
>>> Of course, a large number of individuals, who genuinely would like to
>>> protect their privacy, will not do so because of cognitive biases well
>>> documented in behavioral economics and decision research [1].
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> Alfonso
>>>
>>> [1] Acquisti A., John L., Loewenstein G., "What is privacy worth?",
>>> Future of Privacy Forum,
>>> http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/~acquisti/papers/acquisti-ISR-worth.pdf
>>> --
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