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[liberationtech] Mixed methods Internet research

Courtney Radsch cradsch at gmail.com
Thu Mar 7 04:17:15 PST 2013


Hi Christine,
My doctoral research on the political impact of cyberactivism and citizen
journalism in Egypt used mixed methods and modes. An adapted version of my
methodology chapter was published in a 2009 volume on field research

>From Cell Phones to Coffee: Issues of Access in Egypt. In *Surviving Field
Research <http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415489355/>*, edited
by C. Lekha Sriram, O. Martin-Ortega, J. C. King, J. Mertus and J. Herman.
2009. London: Taylor and Francis Ltd Routledge.

I would also be happy to follow up individually with the final version of
my methodology chapter if you're interested, and would also like to note
that your work has been very influential on my own, it would be great to
connect and discuss further.
Best,
Courtney C. Radsch
cradsch at gmail.com

Website: www.radsch.info
Blog: http://arab-media.blogspot.com
Twitter: courtneyr


On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 2:06 AM,
<liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu>wrote:

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> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of liberationtech digest..."
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>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Re: Cryptography super-group creates unbreakable  encryption
>       (Nadim Kobeissi)
>    2. Can HAM radio be used for communication between   health
>       workers in        rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Yosem
> Companys)
>    3. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (ITechGeek)
>    4. Re: Qihoo 360 in China. (Martin Johnson)
>    5. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication       between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Sky (Jim
> Schuyler))
>    6. CfP: 4S,  "Surveillance & Big Data Mediation" (March 15)
>       (Yosem Companys)
>    7. F2C (Louis Su?rez-Potts)
>    8. Mixed methods Internet research (Yosem Companys)
>    9. Re: Mixed methods Internet research (Katy P)
>   10. F2C Videos are up! (Yosem Companys)
>   11. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community
>       (a.nouvet at secdev.ca)
>   12. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech   Community
>       (Daniel H. Cabrera)
>   13. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community (Sandra)
>   14. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Ali-Reza Anghaie)
>   15. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication       between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Sky (Jim
> Schuyler))
>   16. Re: F2C Videos are up! (Louis Su?rez-Potts)
>   17. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication       between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
>       (Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb)
>   18. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication       between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
>       (Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb)
>   19. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech   Community
>       (Robert Guerra)
>   20. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech   Community
>       (Robert Guerra)
>   21. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication       between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Sky (Jim
> Schuyler))
>   22. GoodJobs Challenge: Open Data, Jobs,      & Social Sector
>       (Yosem Companys)
>   23. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>       workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Ali-Reza Anghaie)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 18:44:03 -0500
> From: Nadim Kobeissi <nadim at nadim.cc>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: liberationtech <liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Cryptography super-group creates
>         unbreakable     encryption
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CAOZ60qBTaW2vX3EcdMZL2cphNYaskLWX6rM7-vBFsV69H54rmQ at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Rich,
> That was the best email I have ever read on this mailing list.
> Congratulations and thank you. Please post this as a blog post somewhere.
>
>
> NK
>
>
> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 6:23 PM, Rich Kulawiec <rsk at gsp.org> wrote:
>
> > On Fri, Feb 15, 2013 at 01:35:53PM -0800, Adam Fisk wrote:
> > > At the risk of getting swept up in this by consciously saying something
> > > unpopular, I want to put my shoulder against the wheel of the "open
> > source
> > > process produces more secure software" machine. [snip]
> >
> > I've been thinking about your (excellent) comments for several weeks now.
> > And I'm going to argue that open source doesn't necessarily produce more
> > secure software, but it's a prerequisite for any credible attempt.  And
> > that in this particular case, there's just no substitute for it.
> >
> > But before I get started, let me pointed out that I'm very much *not*
> > arguing that the contrapositive is true, that "open source == chewy
> > goodness" automatically.  We've all seen open source code that was junk.
> > Lots of it.  We've all probably written some, too; I know I have.
> >
> > So here goes:
> >
> > Consider this hypothetical: you have the imaginary disease Bieberitis,
> > which progressively imposes the characteristics of Justin Bieber on you,
> > then kills you.  So not only do you die, you die badly.  Clearly: it's
> > an awful fate.
> >
> > There are only two drugs available to treat this disease.
> >
> > Drug A has a history that looks something like this: the basic
> > biochemistry has been known for 18 years.  It's been studied at multiple
> > universities and research institutions.  There are numerous published
> > papers on it.  Early animal trials were conducted 15 years ago, and those
> > results were published as well, leading to another round of animal trials
> > with a slightly different formulation and more publication.  Following
> > review by independent agencies 12 years ago, limited human trials were
> > held, with still more publication.  A lengthy review and debate ensued,
> > the drug was discussed and debated at numerous conferences and meetings,
> > other (new) researchers weighed in with their papers, and a second
> > round of human trials took place 9 years ago.  Following that, review
> > by multiple government agencies commenced.  Additional work continued
> > in parallel on refinement of dosage and delivery.  Eventually, following
> > another blizzard of paperwork and publication, the drug was approved --
> > and is now available to you.  Studies are still ongoing, of course,
> > and it's expected that half a dozen more papers will be published in
> > referreed journals this year.
> >
> > So: drug A has a long history.  Lots of clueful eyeballs have
> investigated
> > it personally, and many more clueful eyeballs have read the published
> body
> > of work, thought about it, argued about it, reviewed it, critiqued it,
> > supported it, rebutted it, and otherwise been involved in the process.
> > Moreover: nearly all those clueful eyeballs are INDEPENDENT clueful
> > eyeballs, who have, in many cases, substantial motivation to disprove
> > claims made -- since one of the best ways to make one's academic
> > reputation is to perform ingenious, ground-breaking work which
> > demonstrates that something everyone agrees on is completely wrong.
> >
> > Now, about drug B: drug B has no publications associated with it.
> > It's never been independently reviewed.  It has none of the lengthy
> > history of A.  What's it got?  It's got a shiny color brochure written by
> > the marketing department that tells you how great it is, because it was
> > developed by some of the top people ever.  Really.  Top people.  As in:
> >
> >         Major Eaton: We have top men working on it now.
> >         Indiana Jones: Who?
> >         Major Eaton: Top...men.
> >
> > That's it.  That's all you get.  Promises.  Assurances.  Hand-waving.
> > Top...men.
> >
> > Now: which drug are you going to take?
> >
> > Of course the obvious answer is A, since B is more commonly known as
> > "snake oil".  It's garbage.  No thinking, responsible person would
> > ever choose B, because -- absent the history and the research and
> > the publication and everything else -- it might be the instant cure
> > for Bieberitis, or it might be sugar pills, or it might be poison.
> > There's no way to know.
> >
> > All serious fields of intellectual endeavor use the same model as I
> > outlined in the development of drug A, which I'll lump under the rubric
> > "peer review".  Architecture and law, physics and economics, medicine and
> > civil engineering, everybody uses this.  And they use it because, despite
> > its flaws, it works really, really well.  It's an essential component of
> > the scientific method.  It's how we make forward progress, however
> slowly.
> >
> > Fields of study that don't use this are crap.  Astrology, creationism,
> > alchemy, homeopathy, phrenology, and yes, closed-source software: all
> crap.
> >
> > There is no way we should accept what any closed-source vendor claims
> > about their code.  There is no reason to, no matter who they are, no
> > matter how much we trust them, no matter how pure their motives are.
> > Heck, we often can't even trust OUR OWN CODE to do what we think we want
> > it to do, even when we're staring right at it -- so why in the world
> > should we make the fantastic leap of faith to trust someone else's when
> > we can't even see it?
> >
> > Closed-source software is the equivalent of drug B.  We're expected
> > to take the authors' word that it (a) does everything they say it does
> > and (b) does nothing else.  We're expected to do this despite decades
> > of history proving, many times per day, that this is not only wrong,
> > but completely, wildly, amazingly wrong.  (For a small drink out of
> > the firehose of evidence substantiating that statement, read bugtraq,
> > or full-disclosure, or the -developers list for any substantial project,
> > or the bug queue for something hosted on SourceForge, or check the patch
> > lists for any piece of software, or look at your own code.)
> >
> > We, for a value of "we" meaning "all programmers on this planet",
> > pretty much suck at writing software.  Even the best of us, and I'm
> > sure not one of them, struggle to write programs of any size/complexity
> > that meet their functional specifications and don't have major security
> > or privacy issues.  The only slim chance we have of maybe, MAYBE, on
> > a good day, with the wind blowing in the right direction, of actually
> > getting somewhere vaguely close to what we're aiming at, is peer review.
> > It's not a great chance: but it's the best we've got.
> >
> > Maybe in 50 years that'll change.  Maybe by then we'll able to write
> > large-scale/complex programs with verifiable code that matches verifiable
> > specifications.  But we're not there yet, so yeah, I'm gonna stick with:
> > source or GTFO.
> >
> > But wait!  There's more!
> >
> > This isn't just any old piece of software: this isn't a word processor
> > or a database: this is crypto that is intended to keep people *alive*.
> > And while I won't even pretend to be a cryptographer, one thing I've
> > learned is that developing solid cryptographic algorithms is hard.
> > Really hard.  People with significant expertise in the field spend
> > mountains of time working on them...only to find that 8 months after
> > publication, somebody on the other side of the world has already managed
> > to mount a credible attack.  Then there's a tiny crack...and soon someone
> > else widens the crack...and then, in a flurry of published papers and
> > conference presentations, the whole thing gets demolished.
> >
> > Or at least compromised to such an extent that everyone concurs it won't
> > survive much longer, that what's on the table strongly indicates that
> > better attacks will come along and finish the job.
> >
> > The only way, really, that we can have any confidence in any
> cryptographic
> > algorithm is to see it published...and then wait.  We wait to see what
> > happens when people get a look at it and start thinking about ways to
> > tear it apart using either theoretical or practical attacks, or more
> > likely, both.
> >
> > How long do we wait?  That depends.  There's no fixed schedule.
> > But every year that an algorithm withstands scrutiny slightly increases
> > our confidence that this is not an accident -- that it's not escaping
> > attack because nobody's trying, but because it truly is robust in the
> > face of clueful and determined experts.
> >
> > So in the case of cryptography software, it's not just source or GTFO:
> > it's publish the algorithm or GTFO.
> >
> > ---rsk
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> -------------- next part --------------
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 05 Mar 2013 17:07:25 -0800 (PST)
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in       rural areas with no cell
> connectivity?
> Message-ID:
>         <CANhci9FR8WYtvfz74XKY+5Wq4rwVHwXzv-cBpXpwRJB=
> 2m01CQ at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
>
> Dear All,
>
> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas with
> poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due to
> unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and
> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The other
> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
>
> Thanks,
> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 20:47:08 -0500
> From: ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CAN2EnhAqKMZ5dfktQfrg_mMAKXUUHFzGEDpRBZnAaLeDOPAS2w at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> laws of the local country/countries involved.
>
> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>
> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> identify the patient.
>
> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> frequencies can transmit further.
>
> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> -ITG (ITechGeek)
> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> https://itg.nu/
> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>
>
> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> wrote:
> > From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >
> > Dear All,
> >
> > I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas with
> poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due to
> unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and
> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The other
> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 10:17:57 +0800
> From: Martin Johnson <greatfire at greatfire.org>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Qihoo 360 in China.
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CAC5hmYhCE+_a-_cnmAORgPGpKp0Efef0T8zeuJNisw+fLpCdKw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
> Thanks for sharing Melissa. Around 27% of Internet users in China use the
> Qihoo "Safe Browser". After the man-in-the-middle attack on GitHub in China
> just over a month ago, we made some tests accessing websites with invalid
> SSL certificates in different browsers. The Qihoo browser shows a green
> check suggesting that the website is safe (
> https://en.greatfire.org/blog/2013/jan/china-github-and-man-middle). I
> also
> noticed how, when installing the browser, Qihoo attempts to add a range of
> other software. And, even without browsing, it starts sending data to lots
> of different IP addresses. Investigating what is sent to where is on our
> list of things to do.
>
> Martin Johnson
> Founder of GreatFire.org | FreeWeibo.com | Unblock.cn.com
> PGP key <https://en.greatfire.org/contact>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 at 5:50 AM, Melissa Chan <mchan02 at stanford.edu> wrote:
>
> > Good afternoon,
> >
> > Thought Qihoo's mysterious activities, written up in this piece by Tech
> in
> > Asia, might be of interest to those on this list.  It looks like the team
> > there is continuing the investigation -- apparently there's a weird
> cookie
> > file that gets sent to a Qihoo server every time a user opens IE.  Anyone
> > interested in helping or learning more should email:
> >
> > editors(at)techinasia(dot).com
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Melissa
> >
> >
> > Melissa Chan  |  Correspondent  |  Al Jazeera English  ||  John S. Knight
> > Journalism Fellow  |  Stanford University
> > email  |  mchan02 at stanford.edu  |  twitter  |  @melissakchan  |  mobile
> >  |  909.618.5287
> >
> >
> > Link:
> >
> http://www.techinasia.com/massive-expose-blasts-qihoo-360-cancer-internet/
> >
> >
> > Expose Blasts Qihoo 360 as ?Cancer of the Internet?; Qihoo Denies
> > Everything<
> http://www.techinasia.com/massive-expose-blasts-qihoo-360-cancer-internet/
> >
> >
> > China?s Qihoo 360 <http://techinasia.com/tag/qihoo-360> has a lot of
> > enemies. I?m not just talking about Baidu<
> http://techinasia.com/tag/baidu>,
> > either; lots of net users dislike the company for its dirty tactics<
> http://www.techinasia.com/360-safe-browser-malware/> and
> > China?s State Administration for Industry and Commerce (SAIC) has printed
> > publicly<
> http://www.saic.gov.cn/ywdt/gsyw/dfdt/xxb/201301/t20130130_133021.html>
> that
> > the company has engaged in behaviors most people would call fraudulent<
> http://www.techinasia.com/qihoo-committing-fraud-google-making-huge-mistake/
> >.
> > But a recent expose conducted by an independent investigator and printed
> > in the *National Business Daily*<
> http://www.nbd.com.cn/features/273?preview=true>?
> > supposedly the result of months of investigation ? suggests that Qihoo is
> > doing an awful lot more than most of its users are even aware of.
> >
> > The *National Business Daily* (hereafter: *NBD*) report presents a
> > laundry list of accusations about Qihoo software, backing many of them up
> > with illustrated screenshots demonstrating what?s going on behind the
> > scenes. Among the many allegations: that Qihoo?s 360 Safe Browser
> contains
> > a massive security flaw that messes with users Windows DLL files, that it
> > can expose users? passwords, that it tells users sketchy online payment
> > sites are safe, and that it is making connections the user isn?t aware of
> > even when it?s just loading a blank page. The report also contains more
> > familiar charges like Qihoo products masquerading as official Microsoft
> > patches, forcibly deleting competitor products as ?unsafe?, etc.
> >
> > Qihoo 360 has categorically denied all of the allegations contained in
> the
> > report in a post on its official BBS forums<
> http://bbs.360safe.com/thread-602169-1-1.html>.
> > From Qihoo?s official translation of its response, provided to *Tech in
> > Asia*by a Qihoo representative:
> >
> > The article appears to be an ?aggregation? of most of the past false
> > allegations and claims made by our competitors and our foes. It takes
> those
> > claims from sources such as an ?anonymous individual?, a person who lost
> a
> > lawsuit against us, and a former malware/virus creator, without any basic
> > fact checking. It also completely ignores all the clarification and
> > statements Qihoo 360 has made regarding these false claims, and even
> ignore
> > [sic] high-profile court rulings in the past, in order to portrait [sic]
> a
> > totally biased story against Qihoo 360. We are not surprised that someone
> > hates us so much that it [sic] keeps record of all those [sic] garbage
> and
> > is willing to recycle it in the public domain over and over again. It is
> > not difficult to conclude that there has to be huge economic interest of
> > our foes behind such [an] outrageous attack. We take it very seriously!
> >
> > In its statement, Qihoo also says that it has filed a complaint against *
> > NBD* with GAPP (a government organ that regulates the press) and that it
> > plans to sue *NBD* in court, and will additionally sue ?anyone who
> > intentionally spreads such rumor for defamation.?
> >
> > When asked to respond directly to specific allegations contained in the
> > report, a representative from Qihoo refused, saying that previously
> > published statements should serve as a sufficient response to any
> questions
> > the report raises. Later, however, the company did publish a number of
> > clarifications <http://tech.sina.com.cn/i/2013-02-28/20578099689.shtml>
> that
> > directly address some of the report?s specific allegations.
> >
> > It is clear that Qihoo?s management considers this report and other
> > ?attacks? to be related to its competitors. In a public statement
> > yesterday <http://tech.sina.com.cn/i/2013-02-28/20578099689.shtml>,
> Qihoo
> > CEO Zhou Hongyi <http://techinasia.com/tag/zhou-hongyi> told reporters
> > that the report and others like it were related to Qihoo?s decision to
> enter
> > the search engine field<
> http://www.techinasia.com/qihoo-360-search-engine/>.
> > Zhou said that the *NBD* report was an attempt to ?smear? Qihoo. ?I think
> > that the essence of this is that 360 decided to take on the big players
> in
> > China,? he said, ?as long as we keep doing search, these kind of smear
> > attacks will continue.?
> >
> > Qihoo representatives declined to produce any evidence backing up the
> > implication that its competitors are somehow behind the *NBD* report. A
> > Qihoo representative did link me to this article<
> http://bbs.tianya.cn/post-itinfo-215810-1.shtml>,
> > which suggests that several of the sources in the *NBD* report are being
> > paid by Tencent <http://techinasia.com/tag/tencent>to publish attacks
> > about Qihoo. However, the article contains no evidence to support these
> > claims, and its author is an anonymous Tianya user identified only as
> > shengsheng72011 <http://www.tianya.cn/57321557>.
> >
> > After an extended exchange of emails with *Tech in Asia*, a Qihoo
> > representative implied that Qihoo does have evidence its competitors are
> > behind the *NBD* piece, but declined to share any, writing: ?Sorry
> > mister, the evidences are for the court proceedings.?
> >
> > Although it obviously doesn?t contain any evidence of a connection to
> > Qihoo competitors, the*NBD* report *does* admit that the independent
> > investigator making these claims is biased ? he told the *NBD* he is
> > openly opposed to Qihoo 360, which he considers a ?cancer? that should be
> > ?cut out? from the internet. His fundamental beef with the company comes
> > from what he interprets to be its frequent violation of the principle of
> > least privilege<
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principle_of_least_privilege>.
> > Least privilege is a widely accepted computer programming concept that
> says
> > that any given program should only be automatically given access to what
> it
> > *needs* to access to function. Qihoo, the investigator says, breaks this
> > principle frequently.
> >
> > (You can think about ?least privilege? sort of like a repair man: if he
> > shows up to your house and you aren?t home to let him in, he?ll generally
> > just come back later instead of breaking in on his own. Software that
> > ignores the principle of least privilege is more like a repair man who
> just
> > walks into your house and starts making repairs whether you?re home and
> > aware of his visit or not. The investigator who spoke with the *NBD* put
> > it even more bluntly: Qihoo is like a residential manager who, when he
> gets
> > reports of a dog barking, just breaks into the house and shoots the dog.
> In
> > other words, the investigator is saying Qihoo?s software does way too
> much
> > in the background without making it clear what is happening and asking
> the
> > users? permission.)
> >
> > Of course, the principle of least privilege is not a law, and even if
> > Qihoo?s software is violating it, there isn?t necessarily anything
> illegal
> > about that. It does, however, raise privacy concerns for some users.
> Qihoo
> > representatives refused to respond to a direct query about whether or not
> > the company?s software violates the principle of least privilege.
> >
> > As with most things relating to Qihoo these days, the *NBD* report has
> > spiraled into a pretty ugly he-said she-said mess. We?re a bit tired of
> > that story here at *Tech in Asia*, so in the coming weeks, we?ll be
> > conducting our own investigation into Qihoo?s applications to try to
> assess
> > what, if anything, they are doing wrong.
> >
> > If you have expertise in web security and would like to assist in our
> > investigation, please get it touch with us:
> editors(at)techinasia(dot)com.
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 18:15:43 -0800
> From: "Sky (Jim Schuyler)" <sky at red7.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID: <2ED34AB4-BE47-47C0-8917-5785DFDDE830 at red7.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
> wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
> remotely, and there is software available to do this. However, I'm not sure
> what benefit it would bring to this project.
>
> In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in "clear
> text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
> exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other countries
> it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
> suggest avoiding this.
>
> Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient bandwidth to
> transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but in general
> amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the maximum usable
> transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
>
> -Sky  AA6AX
>
> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> -We work backstage so you can be the star
> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>
> On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com> wrote:
>
> > Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> > laws of the local country/countries involved.
> >
> > HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> > authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
> >
> > Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> > if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> > any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> > identify the patient.
> >
> > And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> > due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> > rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> > frequencies can transmit further.
> >
> > Can you provide the country or countries involved?
> >
> >
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > -ITG (ITechGeek)
> > ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> > https://itg.nu/
> > GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> > Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
> > Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> > http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> wrote:
> >> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >>
> >> Dear All,
> >>
> >> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas
> with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due
> to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and
> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The other
> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >>
> >> Thanks,
> >> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 20:26:37 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: Anders Albrechtslund <alb at hum.au.dk>, Torin Monahan
>         <torin.monahan at unc.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] CfP: 4S,      "Surveillance & Big Data Mediation"
>         (March 15)
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CANhci9GuBzQ51GmWLq3KLWAQLL5cCeNeAJ1F7NfVfebpNeAnqg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
> From: Torin Monahan <torin.monahan at unc.edu>, Anders Albrechtslund
> <alb at hum.au.dk>
>
> Call for Papers (w/ apologies for cross-listing)
>
> Surveillance and the Mediation of Big Data
>
> 4S session(s) organized by Torin Monahan and Anders Albrechtslund
>
> 4S Annual Meeting (http://www.4sonline.org/meeting)
> San Diego, CA
> October 9 - 12, 2013
>
> The ?big data? paradigm signals an intensification and distribution of
> algorithmic surveillance across multiple organizational and
> geographical scales. More than an exponential advancement in storage
> and processing capacity, big data currently operates as a fluid
> metaphor for the potential of data analytics to intelligently predict
> and respond to the needs of individuals and institutions. Clearly STS
> inquiry could fruitfully deconstruct the technological deterministic
> slant of discourses surrounding big data so that attention could be
> drawn to the values being inscribed in algorithms, the profound
> materiality of cloud computing, the control dimensions of pervasive
> software, and the active cultivation of new subjectivities as people
> come to understand themselves through their data doubles. Surveillance
> is key to these processes, as the capture and processing of data is
> frequently oriented toward some form of intervention or control.
> Rather than viewing surveillance through big data as completely
> automated or neutral processes, this panel seeks to investigate the
> many forms of mediation and politics inherent in big-data
> applications.
>
> Possible areas of inquiry might include:
> ?      Data fusion, profiling, and prediction by security organizations.
> ?      The crafting of new subjectivities as individuals embrace
> ?quantified self? movements.
> ?      The social and political effects of ?filter bubbles? erected by
> various search platforms.
> ?      Gamification of interaction with customers and clients as
> public and private organizations seek to capitalize on (and control)
> user involvement.
> ?      Activist and civil-society harnessing of data repositories and
> sensing devices to achieve progressive outcomes.
> ?      The optimization of urban infrastructures through ?smart?
> information technologies.
> ?      Health technologies used for documentation, analyses,
> predictions and recommendations.
>
> Please email titles, abstracts, and institutional affiliations to
> Torin Monahan <torin.monahan at unc.edu> and Anders Albrechtslund
> <alb at hum.au.dk> by March 15, 2013.
>
>
> Torin Monahan, Ph.D.
> Associate Editor, Surveillance & Society
> Associate Professor
> Dept. of Communication Studies
> The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
> www.torinmonahan.com
> NEW BOOK: SuperVision: An Introduction to the Surveillance Society
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 23:33:09 -0500
> From: Louis Su?rez-Potts <luispo at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] F2C
> Message-ID: <0C159730-98A0-400F-9D6C-6638850416D3 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> The Freedom to Connect conference ended today.[0] It was held in Silver
> Spring, MD.
>
> I also seemed immensely interesting and relevant to this list. Amy
> Goodman's Democracy Now! broadcast much of it; she also interviewed several
> interesting participants.[1]
>
> But who on this list was there? And if you were there, can you summarize
> or relate what you found interesting? At least, that is, in terms of
> promulgating lib tech.
>
> Thanks
> louis
>
> [0] http://freedom-to-connect.net/
> [1] http://www.democracynow.org/ (Monday's show is featured at the bottom
> of the page; Tuesday's, 5 Mar., closer to the top.)
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 07:14:46 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: Christine Hine <christine.hine at btinternet.com>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Mixed methods Internet research
> Message-ID:
>         <CANhci9EsUWAsd0Fn3vHEq+eA__HTo=
> iHBi4GYuQY_9cp9fQopA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> From: Christine Hine <christine.hine at btinternet.com>
>
> I'm currently writing a review article on mixed methods Internet research,
> and I'd really appreciate suggestions I might have overlooked of examples
> where researchers combine qualitative and quantitative methods, or
> large-scale and small-scale research designs in understanding Internet
> phenomenon. I'm looking, for example, for instances where researchers
> combine analysis of log file data, or twitter traffic etc with an in-depth
> ethnographic or interview-based study. I'm also interested in mixed mode
> studies, which combine online and offline research or use both born-digital
> data and studies rooted in offline settings to answer a single research
> question. Any suggestions gratefully received - I'm happy to take replies
> offlist and then share the outcomes with the list.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Christine
> Christine Hine
> Department of Sociology
> University of Surrey
> Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7NX, UK
> c.hine at surrey.ac.uk
> <
> https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca03
> 8&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk<https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca03%0A8&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk>
> >
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 07:17:03 -0800
> From: Katy P <katycarvt at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Mixed methods Internet research
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CADBMUMGVueNozXnLpO5MQF-Frpif3MdH9LkT6PFPHk7g3ceiPg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> To toot my own horn, here's a study I did last year
> http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01633.x/full
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 at 7:14 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
> >wrote:
>
> > From: Christine Hine <christine.hine at btinternet.com>
> >
> > I'm currently writing a review article on mixed methods Internet
> research,
> > and I'd really appreciate suggestions I might have overlooked of examples
> > where researchers combine qualitative and quantitative methods, or
> > large-scale and small-scale research designs in understanding Internet
> > phenomenon. I'm looking, for example, for instances where researchers
> > combine analysis of log file data, or twitter traffic etc with an
> in-depth
> > ethnographic or interview-based study. I'm also interested in mixed mode
> > studies, which combine online and offline research or use both
> born-digital
> > data and studies rooted in offline settings to answer a single research
> > question. Any suggestions gratefully received - I'm happy to take replies
> > offlist and then share the outcomes with the list.
> >
> > Best wishes,
> >
> > Christine
> > Christine Hine
> > Department of Sociology
> > University of Surrey
> > Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7NX, UK
> > c.hine at surrey.ac.uk
> > <
> >
> https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca03
> > 8&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk<
> https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca038&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk
> >
> > >
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 08:29:54 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: "David S. Isenberg" <isen at isen.com>
> Subject: [liberationtech] F2C Videos are up!
> Message-ID:
>         <CANhci9EqGxTXVouNhF1XUkbuvdYKPoFBU-=PrWPD4-6fiPeR=
> w at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> From: David S. Isenberg <isen at isen.com>
>
> Thanks to the Internet Society, especially Joly McFie, Paul Brigner,
> Paul Hyland and Paul Franz, the approximately complete video
> archive of F2C: Freedom to Connect for 2013 is now up at
> http://new.livestream.com/internetsociety/f2c for your viewing
> pleasure and/or convenient surveillance.
>
> If you were not able to come, we hope to see you next year!
> If you were able to come, please stay tuned to the attendee-only
> list for important exclusive information critical to the protection
> of the free, open Internet. [Non-attendees may obtain a copy of
> a completely legal image of the entire proceedings from
> AT&T, Room 641A, 611 Folsom Street, San Francisco CA 94107.]
>
> If you care about the free, open Internet -- and media democracy
> in general -- you will not want to miss the National Conference
> for Media Reform in Denver, April 4-7. I'm going. Wouldn't miss
> it.
>
> http://conference.freepress.net/ncmr-2013
>
> Check out some of the amazing speakers! (F2C should be so lucky.)
> http://conference.freepress.net/presenters
>
> CU at F2C14 if we can keep the Internet open for one more year!
> David I
> ------------------
> 203-661-4798 (main number, follows me everywhere)
> 888-isen.com (toll free)
> Twitter: @davidisen
> http://isen.com/blog
> ------------------
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 09:40:09 -0700
> From: a.nouvet at secdev.ca
> To: "liberationtech" <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: sandraordonez at openitp.org
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>         LibTech Community
> Message-ID: <00fcb1fc0c3d40f0b9fc0bfda415e8f4.squirrel at mail.secdev.ca>
> Content-Type: text/plain;charset=utf-8
>
> I'd be interested to join.
>
> Saludos,
> Antoine
>
>
> > If there is enough interest, we could create a Spanish-speaking list.
> > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
> > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
> >
> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira <edulix at wadobo.com
> >
> > wrote:
> >> Hello there!
> >>
> >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are there, but
> >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm the lead
> >> developer of agoravoting.com, an e-democracy voting tool with support
> >> for vote delegation.
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >> --
> >> Eduardo Robles Elvira     +34 668 824 393            skype: edulix2
> >> http://www.wadobo.com    it's not magic, it's wadobo!
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings
> at
> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 12
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 19:17:03 +0000 (GMT)
> From: "Daniel H. Cabrera" <danhcab at yahoo.es>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: "sandraordonez at openitp.org" <sandraordonez at openitp.org>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>         LibTech Community
> Message-ID:
>         <1362597423.96247.YahooMailNeo at web172201.mail.ir2.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> interesado
>
> ?
> Daniel H. Cabrera Altieri
> Profesor Titular de Teor?a de la Comunicaci?n
> Coordinador del Grado en Periodismo
>
> Facultad de Filosof?a y Letras
> Universidad de Zaragoza
> Te. (34) 976761000 ext. 4043
> c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12 - Zaragoza- 50009
> Espa?a
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
>  De: "a.nouvet at secdev.ca" <a.nouvet at secdev.ca>
> Para: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> CC: sandraordonez at openitp.org
> Enviado: Mi?rcoles 6 de marzo de 2013 17:40
> Asunto: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech
> Community
>
> I'd be interested to join.
>
> Saludos,
> Antoine
>
>
> > If there is enough interest, we could create a Spanish-speaking list.
> > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
> > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
> >
> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira <edulix at wadobo.com
> >
> > wrote:
> >> Hello there!
> >>
> >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are there, but
> >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm the lead
> >> developer of agoravoting.com, an e-democracy voting tool with support
> >> for vote delegation.
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >> --
> >> Eduardo Robles Elvira? ?  +34 668 824 393? ? ? ? ? ? skype: edulix2
> >> http://www.wadobo.com? ? it's not magic, it's wadobo!
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings
> at
> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
>
>
> --
> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 13
> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2013 14:44:00 -0500
> From: Sandra <SandraOrdonez at openitp.org>
> To: "Daniel H. Cabrera" <danhcab at yahoo.es>
> Cc: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>         LibTech Community
> Message-ID: <51379C80.3060805 at openitp.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Yah esta :)
>
> On 3/6/13 2:17 PM, Daniel H. Cabrera wrote:
> > interesado
> >
> > Daniel H. Cabrera Altieri
> > Profesor Titular de Teor?a de la Comunicaci?n
> > Coordinador del Grado en Periodismo
> >
> > Facultad de Filosof?a y Letras
> > Universidad de Zaragoza
> > Te. (34) 976761000 ext. 4043
> > c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12 - Zaragoza- 50009
> > Espa?a
> >
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > *De:* "a.nouvet at secdev.ca" <a.nouvet at secdev.ca>
> > *Para:* liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> > *CC:* sandraordonez at openitp.org
> > *Enviado:* Mi?rcoles 6 de marzo de 2013 17:40
> > *Asunto:* Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
> > LibTech Community
> >
> > I'd be interested to join.
> >
> > Saludos,
> > Antoine
> >
> >
> > > If there is enough interest, we could create a Spanish-speaking list.
> > > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
> > > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
> > >
> > > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira
> > <edulix at wadobo.com <mailto:edulix at wadobo.com>>
> > > wrote:
> > >> Hello there!
> > >>
> > >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are there, but
> > >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm the lead
> > >> developer of agoravoting.com, an e-democracy voting tool with support
> > >> for vote delegation.
> > >>
> > >> Regards,
> > >> --
> > >> Eduardo Robles Elvira    +34 668 824 393            skype: edulix2
> > >> http://www.wadobo.com <http://www.wadobo.com/>    it's not magic,
> > it's wadobo!
> > >> --
> > >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
> > <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
> > >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> > > --
> > > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
> > <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
> > > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> > >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
> > <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> Sandra Ordonez
> Community Outreach Manager
> Open Internet Tools Project
> @OpenITP
>
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 14
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 15:08:25 -0500
> From: Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>,
>         dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID:
>         <CAPKVt5KXKYw=ecU6=QJztFkbfJ+=+
> fnE4FHznf4HLmit9HSCiQ at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other problems
> at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
>
> Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and re-deploy
> without a telco or other licensing.
>
> I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
> http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated deck of
> shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field option? About
> as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario - it might
> just work. -Ali
>
>
>
> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com> wrote:
>
> > Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
> > wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
> > remotely, and there is software available to do this. However, I'm not
> sure
> > what benefit it would bring to this project.
> >
> > In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in "clear
> > text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
> > exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other
> countries
> > it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
> > suggest avoiding this.
> >
> > Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient bandwidth to
> > transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but in general
> > amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the maximum usable
> > transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
> >
> > -Sky  AA6AX
> >
> > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> > Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> > -We work backstage so you can be the star
> > Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> > Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> > PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
> >
> > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com> wrote:
> >
> > Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> > laws of the local country/countries involved.
> >
> > HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> > authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
> >
> > Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> > if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> > any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> > identify the patient.
> >
> > And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> > due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> > rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> > frequencies can transmit further.
> >
> > Can you provide the country or countries involved?
> >
> >
> >
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > -ITG (ITechGeek)
> > ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> > https://itg.nu/
> > GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> > Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
> > Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> > http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> > wrote:
> >
> > From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >
> > Dear All,
> >
> > I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas with
> > poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due to
> > unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> > HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> > these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> > communication used for voice communication between health workers
> > themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible
> and
> > what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
> other
> > alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> > hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> -------------- next part --------------
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 15
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 13:09:29 -0800
> From: "Sky (Jim Schuyler)" <sky at red7.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID: <3CC26F4A-0292-457F-9F1E-38E13BA36D35 at red7.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
> Your APRS idea is interesting and I only know it from the "positioning"
> side, not from passing any text, so you may want to continue looking into
> it. I do not know that APRS is currently passing any traffic other than
> positions, at least as used in the US. I also do not know whether it's used
> outside the US. Please do remember that APRS and most other amateur digital
> service are not designed to be "reliable" which means they may not "try
> again" to pass a message and the message may become garbled in
> transmission. Some do attempt to error-correct, but not most.
>
> Some more observations on your criteria:
>
> Low-cost: maybe. Each operator has to have equipment which generally runs
> USD$500 to many thousands. Also Android is low cost if you have some kind
> of connection to the radio operator. So the "last mile" or "first mile"
> depending on how you look at it, is not expensive. But you said tribal
> areas, so I don't know what your challenges would be on that count.
>
> Reliable: amateur radio has varying reliability, and it is easily
> interfered with if someone wants to do that. In planning emergency
> operations we take into account that there may be malicious interference
> even during an emergency. Even most amateur radio digital protocols do not
> have very robust error-correction, so they're a bit iffy.
>
> Easiest to expand: maybe and maybe not. You have to have a stable of radio
> operators available both locally and remotely. (Presuming you want
> information to go from somewhere to somewhere.)
>
> Without a telco: Yes for the amateur portion at least.
>
> Without licensing: Although I encourage folks to become amateur radio
> operators, they do need to be licensed. The government that giveth it can
> taketh it away at the stroke of a pen. I will skip saying more right now.
>
> Also I note in your original statement that you are talking about "tribal
> areas" with poor connectivity. Your challenge is going to be getting your
> signal from the tribal area to a reliable amateur radio operator. That's
> unless the radio operator is already in the tribal area. If the cell phone
> can's connect, then amateur VHF and UHF probably wouldn't work either, so
> you'd have to rely upon HF with longer range but much greater variability
> in terms of signal propagation.
>
> >
>
> Keep in mind that amateur radio is a point-to-point service subject to the
> vagaries of radio propagation. In other words, there is no reliable path
> 24/7 from one point to another unless you're using prearranged VHF or UHF
> frequencies and line of sight propagation. Commonly for emergency ops we
> arrange all of this in advance and have emergency power and operators
> trained, and frequencies and modes chosen. For HF propagation there is no
> guarantee your message will get through because "the bands may be dead."
>
> We've been thinking here (San Francisco) of linking amateur packet radio
> with local mesh wi-fi (see Byzantium Project for example) to transfer some
> traffic in semi-automated ways during emergency, but this is a long way
> from actual implementation. The Byzantium folks are on this list and can
> comment.
>
> HF: high frequency (meaning roughly 1mHz to many gHz, which is reliant
> upon ionospheric conditions for signal propagation
> VHF: very high frequency (generally 100mHz to 150mHz) line of sight
> mostly, with repeaters being generally used
> UHF: ultra? (generally 200mHz and up) line of sight mostly, and repeaters
> APRS: Automatic Packet Reporting System (a digital position-reportig
> protocol used on certain amateur frequencies)
>
> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> -We work backstage so you can be the star
> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>
> On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:08 PM, Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com> wrote:
>
> > I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other
> problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
> >
> > Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
> re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
> >
> > I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
> http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated deck of
> shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field option? About as
> rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario - it might
> just work. -Ali
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com> wrote:
> > Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
> wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
> remotely, and there is software available to do this. However, I'm not sure
> what benefit it would bring to this project.
> >
> > In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in "clear
> text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
> exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other countries
> it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
> suggest avoiding this.
> >
> > Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient bandwidth
> to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but in
> general amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the maximum
> usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
> >
> > -Sky  AA6AX
> >
> > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> > Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> > -We work backstage so you can be the star
> > Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> > Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> > PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
> >
> > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> >> laws of the local country/countries involved.
> >>
> >> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> >> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
> >>
> >> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> >> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> >> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> >> identify the patient.
> >>
> >> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> >> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> >> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> >> frequencies can transmit further.
> >>
> >> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
> >>
> >>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >> -ITG (ITechGeek)
> >> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> >> https://itg.nu/
> >> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> >> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
> DCB1191A
> >> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> >> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
> >>
> >>
> >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> wrote:
> >>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >>>
> >>> Dear All,
> >>>
> >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas
> with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due
> to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and
> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The other
> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >>>
> >>> Thanks,
> >>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
> -------------- next part --------------
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 16
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 16:23:17 -0500
> From: Louis Su?rez-Potts <luispo at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: "David S. Isenberg" <isen at isen.com>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] F2C Videos are up!
> Message-ID: <0F762DE3-2469-482F-9EEA-46C9F060E6E5 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Hey, thanks!
> I'll do my best to further promulgate these.
> BTW, I had not been aware of the Denver conference. It's likely too late
> for me to go, but will track it, if possible, with the aid of the free
> Internet. :-)
>
> Cheers
> louis
>
>
> On 13-03-06, at 11:29 , Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
>
> > From: David S. Isenberg <isen at isen.com>
> >
> > Thanks to the Internet Society, especially Joly McFie, Paul Brigner,
> > Paul Hyland and Paul Franz, the approximately complete video
> > archive of F2C: Freedom to Connect for 2013 is now up at
> > http://new.livestream.com/internetsociety/f2c for your viewing
> > pleasure and/or convenient surveillance.
> >
> > If you were not able to come, we hope to see you next year!
> > If you were able to come, please stay tuned to the attendee-only
> > list for important exclusive information critical to the protection
> > of the free, open Internet. [Non-attendees may obtain a copy of
> > a completely legal image of the entire proceedings from
> > AT&T, Room 641A, 611 Folsom Street, San Francisco CA 94107.]
> >
> > If you care about the free, open Internet -- and media democracy
> > in general -- you will not want to miss the National Conference
> > for Media Reform in Denver, April 4-7. I'm going. Wouldn't miss
> > it.
> >
> > http://conference.freepress.net/ncmr-2013
> >
> > Check out some of the amazing speakers! (F2C should be so lucky.)
> > http://conference.freepress.net/presenters
> >
> > CU at F2C14 if we can keep the Internet open for one more year!
> > David I
> > ------------------
> > 203-661-4798 (main number, follows me everywhere)
> > 888-isen.com (toll free)
> > Twitter: @davidisen
> > http://isen.com/blog
> > ------------------
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 17
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 21:36:41 +0000
> From: Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb <ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID: <190F7F4E-F78B-4F07-A8F3-ED9D83A0707F at ei8fdb.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> Dear Dr. Dey:
>
> Disclosure: I am a licensed amateur radio operator. I am slightly biased.
> :)
>
> I have one answer: Amateur radio. Forget mobile phone networks.  Amateur
> radio is cheap, very durable and will provide you with the functions you
> need, and if you can get access to amateur radio operators in your country,
> you may have free support for the life of your project!
>
> If you can tell us the country you wish to set this project up we can
> possibly help with finding out more about the amateur radio community in
> the country.
>
> To answer your questions:
>
> >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas
> with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due
> to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.
>
> Yes it is downloadable, but as far as I understand (it was the case when I
> wanted to install and use the software), it requires the person wishing to
> operate it to send the administrators of the system a copy of their amateur
> radio licence.
>
> NB: This could have changed.
>
> >>> I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM radio
> software installed can be used for communication used for voice
> communication between health workers themselves and with head quarter staff.
>
> Yes, it would be possible but it would require a) the telecommunications
> infrastructure for an "IP connection" (either mobile phone network, or
> WiFi).
>
> >>> Will it be legally permissible and what technical requirements will be
> needed to set up such system.
>
> I understand it is still a "requirement" to produce a valid amateur radio
> license to get access to the Hamsphere (and similar systems).
>
> The technical requirements are an Internet connection capable of carrying
> your amateur radio software messages. Without either a) a mobile phone
> network, or b) a WiFi (or similar system), c) satellite Internet service
> this is not possible.
>
> >>> The other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
> distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource
> organisation
>
>
> And honestly, would not be a good use of your funds.
>
> - -----------
>
> The APRS discussion:
>
> APRS is still clear text - the only "protection" is that it is a digital
> mode (it is transported over AX.25, a transmission protocol). Anyone with
> an APRS modem and amateur radio *could* decode and read the APRS messages.
>
> End result again is no privacy. Maybe privacy through obscurity.
>
> APRS is used (in UK and Ireland) regularly for passing short messages, and
> information objects (weather conditions/temperature in geographical areas,
> traffic information, movement of rescue teams). I can give you more
> information if you think it's of interest.
>
> There is a system called Winlink (in the States I think its called
> Sailmail?) which can be used to send and receive e-mail, which I think is
> more what you are thinking about.
>
> Winlink operates with a similar objective as e-mail - it sends electronic
> messages to and from stations equipped with Winlink systems. It can be used
> over HF (frequencies with long distance capabilities). But the requirement
> for equipment is greater than 2-way voice communications.
>
>
> However, in this case, I would ask: is there really a need for privacy? Or
> at least is there a need to identify the patient by name, etc?
>
> Idea:
> =====
>
> By European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications (CEPT) regulations
> and the mirroring bodies in other parts of the world, a non-licensed
> individual is allowed to operate a licensed amateur radio station in the
> presence of a license holder. The patient could speak direct to the medical
> staff to explain their conditions, etc.
>
>
> Scenario:
> ========
> (I don't know if this scenario is feasible or reflects real-life
> circumstances. If not, please give some more details for discussion)
>
>
> * A patient goes to the health worker, based with the village/nearest
> health station, with a health complaint.
>
> * The health worker needs assistance in helping diagnosis/treatment from
> his/her headquarters. The health worker has been trained and received an
> amateur radio licence.
>
> * They then call the headquarters for more details on the particular
> patients condition.
>
> * The health worker does not name the individual, but gives his/her
> medical background. As the health worker is present, the patient can talk
> directly to the headquarters and give their information first hand.
>
> * If necessary the patient can be given a pseudonym for use over the radio
> system. The patient's real name could be sent via normal means to the
> headquarters if necessary.
>
> * The headquarters responds with information for the persons case.
>
> * The information exchanged is not personally identifiable (I guess you
> could argue their voice could be used to identify them...).
>
>
> They are just some ideas as I thought. I would argue the licencing
> requirements could be adjusted with the assistance of the government
> departments (usually the "Post and Telegraphs")
>
> I hope that helps Dr. Dey. I wish you all the best with your project, and
> I'd be more than happy in helping however I could.
>
> best regards,
>
> Bernard / ei8fdb
>
>
> On 6 Mar 2013, at 20:08, Ali-Reza Anghaie wrote:
>
> > I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other
> problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
> >
> > Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
> re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
> >
> > I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
> http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated deck of
> shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field option? About as
> rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario - it might
> just work. -Ali
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com> wrote:
> > Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
> wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
> remotely, and there is software available to do this. However, I'm not sure
> what benefit it would bring to this project.
> >
> > In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in "clear
> text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
> exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other countries
> it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
> suggest avoiding this.
> >
> > Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient bandwidth
> to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but in
> general amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the maximum
> usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
> >
> > -Sky  AA6AX
> >
> > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> > Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> > -We work backstage so you can be the star
> > Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> > Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> > PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
> >
> > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> >> laws of the local country/countries involved.
> >>
> >> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> >> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
> >>
> >> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> >> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> >> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> >> identify the patient.
> >>
> >> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> >> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> >> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> >> frequencies can transmit further.
> >>
> >> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
> >>
> >>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >> -ITG (ITechGeek)
> >> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> >> https://itg.nu/
> >> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> >> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
> DCB1191A
> >> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> >> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
> >>
> >>
> >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> wrote:
> >>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >>>
> >>> Dear All,
> >>>
> >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas
> with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due
> to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and
> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The other
> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >>>
> >>> Thanks,
> >>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
> - --------------------------------------
> Bernard / bluboxthief / ei8fdb
>
> IO91XM / www.ei8fdb.org
>
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>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 18
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 21:51:46 +0000
> From: Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb <ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID: <4213F074-399A-4398-83EA-2E9E3AA8CB79 at ei8fdb.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> Howdy AA6AX,
>
> Nice to meet you.
>
> On 6 Mar 2013, at 21:09, Sky (Jim Schuyler) wrote:
>
> > Your APRS idea is interesting and I only know it from the "positioning"
> side, not from passing any text, so you may want to continue looking into
> it. I do not know that APRS is currently passing any traffic other than
> positions, at least as used in the US. I also do not know whether it's used
> outside the US. Please do remember that APRS and most other amateur digital
> service are not designed to be "reliable" which means they may not "try
> again" to pass a message and the message may become garbled in
> transmission. Some do attempt to error-correct, but not most.
>
> Not strictly true. APRS clients can be configured to send messages and
> retry for X attempts. Then it will give up.
>
> Seeing as SMS transmission isn't even guaranteed, I think its a pretty
> good attempt for a system that has been developed totally for free! :)
>
>
> > Even most amateur radio digital protocols do not have very robust
> error-correction, so they're a bit iffy.
>
> That is true.
>
> > Easiest to expand: maybe and maybe not. You have to have a stable of
> radio operators available both locally and remotely. (Presuming you want
> information to go from somewhere to somewhere.)
>
> If as Dr. Dey requested both sides of the communications were between
> health workers and their HQ, you could train up all the health workers and
> possibly even employ a "net controller" (amateur radio lingo for person who
> sits in HQ and is in contact with all the field posts) to co-ordinate
> communications.
>
>
> > Without licensing: Although I encourage folks to become amateur radio
> operators, they do need to be licensed. The government that giveth it can
> taketh it away at the stroke of a pen. I will skip saying more right now.
>
> I agree. I'd go a bit further even and say a restricted licence now-adays
> is trivial to receive.
>
>
> > Also I note in your original statement that you are talking about
> "tribal areas" with poor connectivity. Your challenge is going to be
> getting your signal from the tribal area to a reliable amateur radio
> operator. That's unless the radio operator is already in the tribal area.
> If the cell phone can's connect, then amateur VHF and UHF probably wouldn't
> work either, so you'd have to rely upon HF with longer range but much
> greater variability in terms of signal propagation.
>
> How much can you build a self-sustaining 2M VHF repeater for now-a-days? :)
>
>
> > Keep in mind that amateur radio is a point-to-point service subject to
> the vagaries of radio propagation. In other words, there is no reliable
> path 24/7 from one point to another unless you're using prearranged VHF or
> UHF frequencies and line of sight propagation. Commonly for emergency ops
> we arrange all of this in advance and have emergency power and operators
> trained, and frequencies and modes chosen. For HF propagation there is no
> guarantee your message will get through because "the bands may be dead."
>
> Which is kinda similar when it comes to mobile networks. If it was
> possible to get a telco to carry out some "corporate social responsability"
> work and install even just 2G voice that would be something.
>
> I would argue, you can get a lot more communications bang for buck with
> some trained amateur radio engineers, and some amateur radio equipment,
> than spotty 3G coverage.
>
> Mobile operators work on the premise: when we will make enough money from
> people, we will install equipment. I'd honestly hope they have a different
> business model outside of Europe, but I don't think so.
>
> 73's
>
> /Bernard
>
>
>
> >
> > On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:08 PM, Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com>
> wrote:
> >
> >> I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other
> problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
> >>
> >> Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
> re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
> >>
> >> I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
> http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated deck of
> shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field option? About as
> rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario - it might
> just work. -Ali
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com>
> wrote:
> >> Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
> wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
> remotely, and there is software available to do this. However, I'm not sure
> what benefit it would bring to this project.
> >>
> >> In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in "clear
> text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
> exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other countries
> it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
> suggest avoiding this.
> >>
> >> Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient bandwidth
> to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but in
> general amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the maximum
> usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
> >>
> >> -Sky  AA6AX
> >>
> >> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> -
> >> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> >> -We work backstage so you can be the star
> >> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> >> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> >> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
> >>
> >> On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> >>> laws of the local country/countries involved.
> >>>
> >>> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> >>> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
> >>>
> >>> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> >>> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> >>> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> >>> identify the patient.
> >>>
> >>> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> >>> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> >>> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> >>> frequencies can transmit further.
> >>>
> >>> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
> >>>
> >>>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>> -ITG (ITechGeek)
> >>> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> >>> https://itg.nu/
> >>> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> >>> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
> DCB1191A
> >>> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> >>> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> wrote:
> >>>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >>>>
> >>>> Dear All,
> >>>>
> >>>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas
> with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due
> to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and
> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The other
> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks,
> >>>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> >>>> --
> >>>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
> - --------------------------------------
> Bernard / bluboxthief / ei8fdb
>
> IO91XM / www.ei8fdb.org
>
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>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 19
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 17:01:19 -0500
> From: Robert Guerra <rguerra at privaterra.org>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>         LibTech Community
> Message-ID: <D4471B86-33B3-419E-9385-E166C431B99A at privaterra.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Aqui presente y interesado en contectar con otros hispanhablantes activo
> en el tema...
>
> (here and interested in connecting with other spanish speakers active on
> this issue)
>
> Robert
>
> --
> R. Guerra
> Phone/Cell: +1 202-905-2081
> Twitter: twitter.com/netfreedom
> Email: rguerra at privaterra.org
>
> On 2013-03-05, at 11:56 AM, Sandra ordonez wrote:
>
> > Looking to connect for Spanish-speaking LibTech community members for a
> community initiative. Please reach out to sandraordonez [@] openitp [dot]
> org
> > ---
> > Estoy tratando de conectar con hispanohablantes para un una iniciativa
> comunitaria. Por favor, ponerse en contacto con sandraordonez [@] openitp
> [dot] org
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
> -------------- next part --------------
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 20
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 17:03:39 -0500
> From: Robert Guerra <rguerra at privaterra.org>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>         LibTech Community
> Message-ID: <0B180235-909D-4CF1-8AE4-F2A49629D119 at privaterra.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Ya existe una lista con enfoque en LAC. Aqui los detalles -
>
> RedLatAm mailing list
> RedLatAm at lists.accessnow.org
> https://lists.accessnow.org/listinfo/redlatam
>
> Roberto
>
> --
> R. Guerra
> Phone/Cell: +1 202-905-2081
> Twitter: twitter.com/netfreedom
> Email: rguerra at privaterra.org
>
> On 2013-03-06, at 2:44 PM, Sandra wrote:
>
> > Yah esta :)
> >
> > On 3/6/13 2:17 PM, Daniel H. Cabrera wrote:
> >> interesado
> >>
> >> Daniel H. Cabrera Altieri
> >> Profesor Titular de Teor?a de la Comunicaci?n
> >> Coordinador del Grado en Periodismo
> >>
> >> Facultad de Filosof?a y Letras
> >> Universidad de Zaragoza
> >> Te. (34) 976761000 ext. 4043
> >> c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12 - Zaragoza - 50009
> >> Espa?a
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> De: "a.nouvet at secdev.ca" <a.nouvet at secdev.ca>
> >> Para: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> >> CC: sandraordonez at openitp.org
> >> Enviado: Mi?rcoles 6 de marzo de 2013 17:40
> >> Asunto: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
> LibTech Community
> >>
> >> I'd be interested to join.
> >>
> >> Saludos,
> >> Antoine
> >>
> >>
> >> > If there is enough interest, we could create a Spanish-speaking list.
> >> > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
> >> > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
> >> >
> >> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira <
> edulix at wadobo.com>
> >> > wrote:
> >> >> Hello there!
> >> >>
> >> >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are there, but
> >> >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm the lead
> >> >> developer of agoravoting.com, an e-democracy voting tool with
> support
> >> >> for vote delegation.
> >> >>
> >> >> Regards,
> >> >> --
> >> >> Eduardo Robles Elvira    +34 668 824 393            skype: edulix2
> >> >> http://www.wadobo.com    it's not magic, it's wadobo!
> >> >> --
> >> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> >> >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your
> settings at
> >> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >> > --
> >> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> >> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your
> settings at
> >> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Sandra Ordonez
> > Community Outreach Manager
> > Open Internet Tools Project
> > @OpenITP
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
> -------------- next part --------------
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> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 21
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 14:41:14 -0800
> From: "Sky (Jim Schuyler)" <sky at cyberspark.net>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID: <DA88B0D4-C8E9-4F3F-8890-6F8681FFC5F9 at cyberspark.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Thanks, Bernard for the info on APRS. I am out of date as I don't use it.
>
> You are especially right that here in the US it's easy to get a Technician
> license, which is the entry-level amateur license issued by the FCC. It
> takes maybe 3 hours of study and a 30-minute test. I'd guess you have
> something similar in Ireland and most of Europe.
>
> Dr. Dey, could we know the country in which you're considering using this
> approach? That would help us understand the licensing structure there. And
> also the distances you are talking about. Are the tribal areas 20 miles
> from reliable cellular service or are they 200 miles out?
>
> If you prefer to handle it off-list, it looks like there are a few people
> who would be interested.
>
> I am checking this HamSphere that is mentioned, and I don't see that it's
> actually using radio anywhere. It appears to "simulate" an amateur radio
> station but use the Internet for communication. Not enough time to download
> and test this today.
>
> So in terms of offering even a partial solution, perhaps figuring out
> whether amateur radio could be provided in some inexpensive way to these
> out-of-the-way areas would be of interest. Could locals become licensed?
> Could radio equipment be available at an affordable price? Could
> "itinerant" operators do the job on motorcycles? Etc. If so, then more
> complex messages could certainly be transmitted and there would be a wider
> window to the world from the remote locations. The original question asked
> about "voice" so the fact that I (or others) diverted this to digital modes
> may be, in fact, just a diversion.
>
> The Byzantium Project folks (wi-fi mesh) have some amateur operators among
> their numbers and might also have opinions on how easy it is to get folks
> licensed, and also on "edge" connections of mesh and other networks to
> amateurs (which is severely limited by law). My take is that even though
> hams tend to think it's easy to get a license, there are significant (maybe
> psychological) barriers to entry. Maybe it's just that mobile phones
> provide so many of the same benefits without the licensure hassle?
>
> Some of the people on this list know how wi-fi can be provisioned over
> fairly long distances using high-gain antennas and mesh software. It seems
> to me that this might be an interesting way to go about getting real
> Internet connectivity. I've been on the list a couple of years and heard
> only sporadic conversation about using long-distance wi-fi as a liberating
> technology. An example of a regional network that I've known since 2005 is
> airjaldi.com in northern India, but I know there are others in Africa,
> South/East Asia and South America. They aren't necessarily formed to
> liberate people from governmental oppression, but they are providing
> much-needed connections for their remote communities.
>
> (Switching back to my proper email address for this reply)
>
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
> CyberSpark.net
> -Keeping the flame of free speech
>       and human rights alive online
>
> On Mar 6, 2013, at 1:51 PM, Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb <ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org>
> wrote:
>
> > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> > Hash: SHA1
> >
> > Howdy AA6AX,
> >
> > Nice to meet you.
> >
> > On 6 Mar 2013, at 21:09, Sky (Jim Schuyler) wrote:
> >
> >> Your APRS idea is interesting and I only know it from the "positioning"
> side, not from passing any text, so you may want to continue looking into
> it. I do not know that APRS is currently passing any traffic other than
> positions, at least as used in the US. I also do not know whether it's used
> outside the US. Please do remember that APRS and most other amateur digital
> service are not designed to be "reliable" which means they may not "try
> again" to pass a message and the message may become garbled in
> transmission. Some do attempt to error-correct, but not most.
> >
> > Not strictly true. APRS clients can be configured to send messages and
> retry for X attempts. Then it will give up.
> >
> > Seeing as SMS transmission isn't even guaranteed, I think its a pretty
> good attempt for a system that has been developed totally for free! :)
> >
> >
> >> Even most amateur radio digital protocols do not have very robust
> error-correction, so they're a bit iffy.
> >
> > That is true.
> >
> >> Easiest to expand: maybe and maybe not. You have to have a stable of
> radio operators available both locally and remotely. (Presuming you want
> information to go from somewhere to somewhere.)
> >
> > If as Dr. Dey requested both sides of the communications were between
> health workers and their HQ, you could train up all the health workers and
> possibly even employ a "net controller" (amateur radio lingo for person who
> sits in HQ and is in contact with all the field posts) to co-ordinate
> communications.
> >
> >
> >> Without licensing: Although I encourage folks to become amateur radio
> operators, they do need to be licensed. The government that giveth it can
> taketh it away at the stroke of a pen. I will skip saying more right now.
> >
> > I agree. I'd go a bit further even and say a restricted licence
> now-adays is trivial to receive.
> >
> >
> >> Also I note in your original statement that you are talking about
> "tribal areas" with poor connectivity. Your challenge is going to be
> getting your signal from the tribal area to a reliable amateur radio
> operator. That's unless the radio operator is already in the tribal area.
> If the cell phone can's connect, then amateur VHF and UHF probably wouldn't
> work either, so you'd have to rely upon HF with longer range but much
> greater variability in terms of signal propagation.
> >
> > How much can you build a self-sustaining 2M VHF repeater for now-a-days?
> :)
> >
> >
> >> Keep in mind that amateur radio is a point-to-point service subject to
> the vagaries of radio propagation. In other words, there is no reliable
> path 24/7 from one point to another unless you're using prearranged VHF or
> UHF frequencies and line of sight propagation. Commonly for emergency ops
> we arrange all of this in advance and have emergency power and operators
> trained, and frequencies and modes chosen. For HF propagation there is no
> guarantee your message will get through because "the bands may be dead."
> >
> > Which is kinda similar when it comes to mobile networks. If it was
> possible to get a telco to carry out some "corporate social responsability"
> work and install even just 2G voice that would be something.
> >
> > I would argue, you can get a lot more communications bang for buck with
> some trained amateur radio engineers, and some amateur radio equipment,
> than spotty 3G coverage.
> >
> > Mobile operators work on the premise: when we will make enough money
> from people, we will install equipment. I'd honestly hope they have a
> different business model outside of Europe, but I don't think so.
> >
> > 73's
> >
> > /Bernard
> >
> >
> >
> >>
> >> On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:08 PM, Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com>
> wrote:
> >>
> >>> I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other
> problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
> >>>
> >>> Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
> re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
> >>>
> >>> I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
> http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated deck of
> shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field option? About as
> rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario - it might
> just work. -Ali
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com>
> wrote:
> >>> Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
> wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
> remotely, and there is software available to do this. However, I'm not sure
> what benefit it would bring to this project.
> >>>
> >>> In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in "clear
> text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
> exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other countries
> it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
> suggest avoiding this.
> >>>
> >>> Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient bandwidth
> to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but in
> general amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the maximum
> usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
> >>>
> >>> -Sky  AA6AX
> >>>
> >>> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> - -
> >>> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> >>> -We work backstage so you can be the star
> >>> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> >>> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> >>> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
> >>>
> >>> On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> >>>> laws of the local country/countries involved.
> >>>>
> >>>> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> >>>> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
> >>>>
> >>>> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> >>>> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> >>>> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> >>>> identify the patient.
> >>>>
> >>>> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> >>>> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> >>>> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> >>>> frequencies can transmit further.
> >>>>
> >>>> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
> >>>>
> >>>>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>> -ITG (ITechGeek)
> >>>> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> >>>> https://itg.nu/
> >>>> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> >>>> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
> DCB1191A
> >>>> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> >>>> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> wrote:
> >>>>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Dear All,
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas
> with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due
> to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know whether
> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and
> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The other
> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance WiFi
> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Thanks,
> >>>>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> >>>>> --
> >>>>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password
> by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings
> at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>>> --
> >>>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>
> >> --
> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >
> > - --------------------------------------
> > Bernard / bluboxthief / ei8fdb
> >
> > IO91XM / www.ei8fdb.org
> >
> > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
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> > Comment: GPGTools - http://gpgtools.org
> >
> > iQEcBAEBAgAGBQJRN7pzAAoJENsz1IO7MIrrwc8H/2UmvZKZSp0qBUNwUD8h5zOL
> > lMchVOn+LJPK5rzG+Fe0xAXBEQRf+ZK9V+kt5MoaUBTBOxT5HeqLwjE1xB9NYQaD
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> > =phNo
> > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
> > --
> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 22
> Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2013 15:25:30 -0800 (PST)
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Cc: Bowen Pan <bowenpan at gsb.stanford.edu>,      Elizabeth Woodson
>         <ewoodson at stanford.edu>,        Pukar Hamal <pchamal at stanford.edu>,
> Sam
>         Spiewak <spiewak at stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] GoodJobs Challenge: Open Data, Jobs,  &
>         Social Sector
> Message-ID:
>         <CANhci9EFu1JSzQfrdBfSFwjZYX8Ysp=
> dRwJ+-amzcGv6gtuudw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> From: Pukar Hamal <pchamal at stanford.edu>, Sam Spiewak <
> spiewak at stanford.edu>,
> Bowen Pan <bowenpan at gsb.stanford.edu>, Elizabeth Woodson <
> ewoodson at stanford.edu>
>
> *GoodJobs*
>
> A challenge focused on open data, jobs, and the social sector
>
> GoodJobs invites Stanford students to create mobile and web tools that will
> help young people access social impact jobs.
>
> *Who is behind it?*
>
>    - Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
>    - White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation
>    - White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
>    - Aspen Institute Impact Careers Initiative
>
> *Who can participate?*
> Any Stanford student who is passionate about social impact! Whether you are
> a graduate or undergrad, have coding and data skills or social sector
> expertise, specialize in marketing or product design, or are just
> interested in participating, you are welcome to register.
>
> *How will it work?*
> Teams of 4-6 students from diverse areas of expertise will form prior to
> the event and will have the opportunity to review the data sets ahead of
> time. On April 20th, all the teams will come together at Stanford?s
> d.school to work intensely for a full day fleshing out their ideas, getting
> expert mentoring and input, designing a prototype, and planning their
> pitch.
>
> *Judges*
>
>    - Aditya Agarwal - VP of Engineering, Dropbox
>    - Lucy Bernholz ? Visiting Scholar, Stanford Center on Philanthropy and
>    Civil Society
>    - Somesh Dash ? Principal, Institutional Venture Partners
>    - Jonathan Greenblatt ? Director, White House Office of Social
> Innovation
>    - John Lilly ? Partner, Greylock Partners
>    - Dustin Moskovitz ? Co-founder, Facebook
>    - (more to be announced)
>
>
> *Register*
> http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/pacs-forms/goodjobs.fb
>  <http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/pacs-forms/goodjobs.fb>
>
> IMPORTANT: enrollment is limited and we will be selecting the best
> applicants. Apply today!
>
> *FAQs & Questions*
>
>    - I have a team in mind, can we register together? Yes.
>    - Do I need to have a team already? No, individuals can register and be
>    matched with a team.
>    - I'm not a coder but I know a lot about the social sector, can I
>    participate? Yes!
>
>
> *Questions?*
>
>    - Sam Spiewak, Program Manger, the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and
>    Civil Society:spiewak at stanford.edu
>    - Elizabeth Woodson, Director of Outreach, the Stanford Center on
>    Philanthropy and Civil Society: ewoodson at stanford.edu
> -------------- next part --------------
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 23
> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 20:06:17 -0500
> From: Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com>
> To: "Dr.Tusharkanti Dey" <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>,
>         liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>         between health workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
> Message-ID:
>         <CAPKVt5+wpMzGszAbMcixuH_Wod1pM=zrZYLaSz=
> QnQ3fMDo4ng at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Dr. Dey,
>
> It appears you let the list off the response to me. Likewise it appears you
> have been dropped from the list discussion. You can see everyone's
> responses at:
>
>
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/pipermail/liberationtech/2013-March/thread.html(Scroll
> toward bottom for thread)
>
> The Android HAM option is software control of an external HAM receiver or a
> web-site that relays HAM radio groups. It is not an actual radio solution
> and will require the regular cellular data network to function - which
> defeats the purpose of what you require.
>
> Good luck, Cheers, -Ali
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 at 7:39 PM, Dr.Tusharkanti Dey <
> dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Dear All,
> >
> > Thank you very much for your inputs.
> >
> > Transmission of voice communication in tribal inhabitated hilly areas  is
> > really difficult as the strength of the signals from mobile transmission
> > towers are almost nil. I thougt that, the solution in this situation can
> be
> >
> > 1. Setting up of mobile signal strength boosters.
> >
> > 2. Setting up mid range wifi system .
> >
> > Both this options are not suitable for our organisation as our resources
> > are limited to bear the cost.
> >
> > Android phones are avilable in Indian Markets at a price of Rs. 3000/- to
> > 4000/- ( approximately) ., where as HAM radio transrecivers are more
> > costly. Also, HAM radio operators transmit valuable voice communications
> in
> > timre of emergencies. Why this can not be used for voice communication in
> > difficult areas while HAM radio transreceivers can be installed on
> android
> > phones. Will any body pl reply in details?
> >
> > If HAM radio can not applied what is the other low cost solutions ? My
> > intension is that voice communication will be trans mitted between
> > headquarters to health workers and amongst health workers. I would like
> to
> > transmit vioce over an area of 10-20 sq. Km.
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> > On Mar 7, 2013 1:38 AM, "Ali-Reza Anghaie" <ali at packetknife.com> wrote:
> >
> >> I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other
> >> problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
> >>
> >> Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
> re-deploy
> >> without a telco or other licensing.
> >>
> >> I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
> >> http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated deck
> of
> >> shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field option? About
> >> as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario - it
> >> might just work. -Ali
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com>
> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
> >>> wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
> >>> remotely, and there is software available to do this. However, I'm not
> sure
> >>> what benefit it would bring to this project.
> >>>
> >>> In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in "clear
> >>> text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
> >>> exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other
> countries
> >>> it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
> >>> suggest avoiding this.
> >>>
> >>> Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient bandwidth
> >>> to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but in
> >>> general amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the
> maximum
> >>> usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
> >>>
> >>> -Sky  AA6AX
> >>>
> >>>      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> >>> - - - -
> >>> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
> >>> -We work backstage so you can be the star
> >>> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
> >>> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
> >>> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
> >>>
> >>> On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
> >>> laws of the local country/countries involved.
> >>>
> >>> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
> >>> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
> >>>
> >>> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
> >>> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
> >>> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
> >>> identify the patient.
> >>>
> >>> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
> >>> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
> >>> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
> >>> frequencies can transmit further.
> >>>
> >>> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>> -ITG (ITechGeek)
> >>> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
> >>> https://itg.nu/
> >>> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
> >>> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
> DCB1191A
> >>> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
> >>> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> >>> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
> >>>
> >>> Dear All,
> >>>
> >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal areas
> with
> >>> poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone connectivity due
> to
> >>> unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software from
> >>> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know
> whether
> >>> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be used for
> >>> communication used for voice communication between health workers
> >>> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible
> and
> >>> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
> other
> >>> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long distance
> WiFi
> >>> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource organisation
> >>>
> >>> Thanks,
> >>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> >>> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings
> >>> at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> >>> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings
> >>> at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by
> >>> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings
> >>> at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
> >>>
> >>
> >>
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> **********************************************
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