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[liberationtech] Mixed methods Internet research

Volker Wulf volker.wulf at fit.fraunhofer.de
Fri Mar 8 10:48:07 PST 2013


Hi Christine and Courtney,

maybe interesting: we did a study of social media use during the 
Tunisian uprising in 2010/11 in the city where it the revolution 
started: Sidi Bouzid. It was an interview study on the role Facebook 
played in enabling citizen and political activists: 
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2441776.2441935

Volker Wulf
Am 07.03.2013 13:17, schrieb Courtney Radsch:
> Hi Christine,
> My doctoral research on the political impact of cyberactivism and 
> citizen journalism in Egypt used mixed methods and modes. An adapted 
> version of my methodology chapter was published in a 2009 volume on 
> field research
>
> From Cell Phones to Coffee: Issues of Access in Egypt. In /Surviving 
> Field Research 
> <http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415489355/>/, edited by C. 
> Lekha Sriram, O. Martin-Ortega, J. C. King, J. Mertus and J. Herman. 
> 2009. London: Taylor and Francis Ltd Routledge.
>
> I would also be happy to follow up individually with the final version 
> of my methodology chapter if you're interested, and would also like to 
> note that your work has been very influential on my own, it would be 
> great to connect and discuss further.
> Best,
> Courtney C. Radsch
> cradsch at gmail.com <mailto:cradsch at gmail.com>
>
> Website: www.radsch.info <http://www.radsch.info>
> Blog: http://arab-media.blogspot.com
> Twitter: courtneyr
>
>
> On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 2:06 AM, 
> <liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu 
> <mailto:liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu>> wrote:
>
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>     Today's Topics:
>
>        1. Re: Cryptography super-group creates unbreakable  encryption
>           (Nadim Kobeissi)
>        2. Can HAM radio be used for communication between   health
>           workers in        rural areas with no cell connectivity?
>     (Yosem Companys)
>        3. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (ITechGeek)
>        4. Re: Qihoo 360 in China. (Martin Johnson)
>        5. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Sky (Jim
>     Schuyler))
>        6. CfP: 4S,  "Surveillance & Big Data Mediation" (March 15)
>           (Yosem Companys)
>        7. F2C (Louis Su?rez-Potts)
>        8. Mixed methods Internet research (Yosem Companys)
>        9. Re: Mixed methods Internet research (Katy P)
>       10. F2C Videos are up! (Yosem Companys)
>       11. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community
>           (a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>)
>       12. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community
>           (Daniel H. Cabrera)
>       13. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community
>     (Sandra)
>       14. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Ali-Reza
>     Anghaie)
>       15. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Sky (Jim
>     Schuyler))
>       16. Re: F2C Videos are up! (Louis Su?rez-Potts)
>       17. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
>           (Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb)
>       18. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity?
>           (Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb)
>       19. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community
>           (Robert Guerra)
>       20. Re: Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community
>           (Robert Guerra)
>       21. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Sky (Jim
>     Schuyler))
>       22. GoodJobs Challenge: Open Data, Jobs,      & Social Sector
>           (Yosem Companys)
>       23. Re: Can HAM radio be used for communication between health
>           workers in rural areas with no cell connectivity? (Ali-Reza
>     Anghaie)
>
>
>     ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>     Message: 1
>     Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 18:44:03 -0500
>     From: Nadim Kobeissi <nadim at nadim.cc>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: liberationtech <liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Cryptography super-group creates
>             unbreakable     encryption
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CAOZ60qBTaW2vX3EcdMZL2cphNYaskLWX6rM7-vBFsV69H54rmQ at mail.gmail.com <mailto:CAOZ60qBTaW2vX3EcdMZL2cphNYaskLWX6rM7-vBFsV69H54rmQ at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>     Rich,
>     That was the best email I have ever read on this mailing list.
>     Congratulations and thank you. Please post this as a blog post
>     somewhere.
>
>
>     NK
>
>
>     On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 6:23 PM, Rich Kulawiec <rsk at gsp.org
>     <mailto:rsk at gsp.org>> wrote:
>
>     > On Fri, Feb 15, 2013 at 01:35:53PM -0800, Adam Fisk wrote:
>     > > At the risk of getting swept up in this by consciously saying
>     something
>     > > unpopular, I want to put my shoulder against the wheel of the
>     "open
>     > source
>     > > process produces more secure software" machine. [snip]
>     >
>     > I've been thinking about your (excellent) comments for several
>     weeks now.
>     > And I'm going to argue that open source doesn't necessarily
>     produce more
>     > secure software, but it's a prerequisite for any credible
>     attempt.  And
>     > that in this particular case, there's just no substitute for it.
>     >
>     > But before I get started, let me pointed out that I'm very much
>     *not*
>     > arguing that the contrapositive is true, that "open source == chewy
>     > goodness" automatically.  We've all seen open source code that
>     was junk.
>     > Lots of it.  We've all probably written some, too; I know I have.
>     >
>     > So here goes:
>     >
>     > Consider this hypothetical: you have the imaginary disease
>     Bieberitis,
>     > which progressively imposes the characteristics of Justin Bieber
>     on you,
>     > then kills you.  So not only do you die, you die badly.
>      Clearly: it's
>     > an awful fate.
>     >
>     > There are only two drugs available to treat this disease.
>     >
>     > Drug A has a history that looks something like this: the basic
>     > biochemistry has been known for 18 years.  It's been studied at
>     multiple
>     > universities and research institutions.  There are numerous
>     published
>     > papers on it.  Early animal trials were conducted 15 years ago,
>     and those
>     > results were published as well, leading to another round of
>     animal trials
>     > with a slightly different formulation and more publication.
>      Following
>     > review by independent agencies 12 years ago, limited human
>     trials were
>     > held, with still more publication.  A lengthy review and debate
>     ensued,
>     > the drug was discussed and debated at numerous conferences and
>     meetings,
>     > other (new) researchers weighed in with their papers, and a second
>     > round of human trials took place 9 years ago.  Following that,
>     review
>     > by multiple government agencies commenced.  Additional work
>     continued
>     > in parallel on refinement of dosage and delivery.  Eventually,
>     following
>     > another blizzard of paperwork and publication, the drug was
>     approved --
>     > and is now available to you.  Studies are still ongoing, of course,
>     > and it's expected that half a dozen more papers will be published in
>     > referreed journals this year.
>     >
>     > So: drug A has a long history.  Lots of clueful eyeballs have
>     investigated
>     > it personally, and many more clueful eyeballs have read the
>     published body
>     > of work, thought about it, argued about it, reviewed it,
>     critiqued it,
>     > supported it, rebutted it, and otherwise been involved in the
>     process.
>     > Moreover: nearly all those clueful eyeballs are INDEPENDENT clueful
>     > eyeballs, who have, in many cases, substantial motivation to
>     disprove
>     > claims made -- since one of the best ways to make one's academic
>     > reputation is to perform ingenious, ground-breaking work which
>     > demonstrates that something everyone agrees on is completely wrong.
>     >
>     > Now, about drug B: drug B has no publications associated with it.
>     > It's never been independently reviewed.  It has none of the lengthy
>     > history of A.  What's it got?  It's got a shiny color brochure
>     written by
>     > the marketing department that tells you how great it is, because
>     it was
>     > developed by some of the top people ever.  Really.  Top people.
>      As in:
>     >
>     >         Major Eaton: We have top men working on it now.
>     >         Indiana Jones: Who?
>     >         Major Eaton: Top...men.
>     >
>     > That's it.  That's all you get.  Promises.  Assurances.
>      Hand-waving.
>     > Top...men.
>     >
>     > Now: which drug are you going to take?
>     >
>     > Of course the obvious answer is A, since B is more commonly known as
>     > "snake oil".  It's garbage.  No thinking, responsible person would
>     > ever choose B, because -- absent the history and the research and
>     > the publication and everything else -- it might be the instant cure
>     > for Bieberitis, or it might be sugar pills, or it might be poison.
>     > There's no way to know.
>     >
>     > All serious fields of intellectual endeavor use the same model as I
>     > outlined in the development of drug A, which I'll lump under the
>     rubric
>     > "peer review".  Architecture and law, physics and economics,
>     medicine and
>     > civil engineering, everybody uses this.  And they use it
>     because, despite
>     > its flaws, it works really, really well.  It's an essential
>     component of
>     > the scientific method.  It's how we make forward progress,
>     however slowly.
>     >
>     > Fields of study that don't use this are crap.  Astrology,
>     creationism,
>     > alchemy, homeopathy, phrenology, and yes, closed-source
>     software: all crap.
>     >
>     > There is no way we should accept what any closed-source vendor
>     claims
>     > about their code.  There is no reason to, no matter who they are, no
>     > matter how much we trust them, no matter how pure their motives are.
>     > Heck, we often can't even trust OUR OWN CODE to do what we think
>     we want
>     > it to do, even when we're staring right at it -- so why in the world
>     > should we make the fantastic leap of faith to trust someone
>     else's when
>     > we can't even see it?
>     >
>     > Closed-source software is the equivalent of drug B.  We're expected
>     > to take the authors' word that it (a) does everything they say
>     it does
>     > and (b) does nothing else.  We're expected to do this despite
>     decades
>     > of history proving, many times per day, that this is not only wrong,
>     > but completely, wildly, amazingly wrong.  (For a small drink out of
>     > the firehose of evidence substantiating that statement, read
>     bugtraq,
>     > or full-disclosure, or the -developers list for any substantial
>     project,
>     > or the bug queue for something hosted on SourceForge, or check
>     the patch
>     > lists for any piece of software, or look at your own code.)
>     >
>     > We, for a value of "we" meaning "all programmers on this planet",
>     > pretty much suck at writing software.  Even the best of us, and I'm
>     > sure not one of them, struggle to write programs of any
>     size/complexity
>     > that meet their functional specifications and don't have major
>     security
>     > or privacy issues.  The only slim chance we have of maybe, MAYBE, on
>     > a good day, with the wind blowing in the right direction, of
>     actually
>     > getting somewhere vaguely close to what we're aiming at, is peer
>     review.
>     > It's not a great chance: but it's the best we've got.
>     >
>     > Maybe in 50 years that'll change.  Maybe by then we'll able to write
>     > large-scale/complex programs with verifiable code that matches
>     verifiable
>     > specifications.  But we're not there yet, so yeah, I'm gonna
>     stick with:
>     > source or GTFO.
>     >
>     > But wait!  There's more!
>     >
>     > This isn't just any old piece of software: this isn't a word
>     processor
>     > or a database: this is crypto that is intended to keep people
>     *alive*.
>     > And while I won't even pretend to be a cryptographer, one thing I've
>     > learned is that developing solid cryptographic algorithms is hard.
>     > Really hard.  People with significant expertise in the field spend
>     > mountains of time working on them...only to find that 8 months after
>     > publication, somebody on the other side of the world has already
>     managed
>     > to mount a credible attack.  Then there's a tiny crack...and
>     soon someone
>     > else widens the crack...and then, in a flurry of published
>     papers and
>     > conference presentations, the whole thing gets demolished.
>     >
>     > Or at least compromised to such an extent that everyone concurs
>     it won't
>     > survive much longer, that what's on the table strongly indicates
>     that
>     > better attacks will come along and finish the job.
>     >
>     > The only way, really, that we can have any confidence in any
>     cryptographic
>     > algorithm is to see it published...and then wait.  We wait to
>     see what
>     > happens when people get a look at it and start thinking about
>     ways to
>     > tear it apart using either theoretical or practical attacks, or more
>     > likely, both.
>     >
>     > How long do we wait?  That depends.  There's no fixed schedule.
>     > But every year that an algorithm withstands scrutiny slightly
>     increases
>     > our confidence that this is not an accident -- that it's not
>     escaping
>     > attack because nobody's trying, but because it truly is robust
>     in the
>     > face of clueful and determined experts.
>     >
>     > So in the case of cryptography software, it's not just source or
>     GTFO:
>     > it's publish the algorithm or GTFO.
>     >
>     > ---rsk
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     -------------- next part --------------
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>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 2
>     Date: Tue, 05 Mar 2013 17:07:25 -0800 (PST)
>     From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>
>     To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     Subject: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in       rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CANhci9FR8WYtvfz74XKY+5Wq4rwVHwXzv-cBpXpwRJB=2m01CQ at mail.gmail.com <mailto:2m01CQ at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>     From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>
>     Dear All,
>
>     I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that
>     HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android
>     phones.I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and what
>     technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
>     other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited
>     resource organisation
>
>     Thanks,
>     Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 3
>     Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 20:47:08 -0500
>     From: ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CAN2EnhAqKMZ5dfktQfrg_mMAKXUUHFzGEDpRBZnAaLeDOPAS2w at mail.gmail.com <mailto:CAN2EnhAqKMZ5dfktQfrg_mMAKXUUHFzGEDpRBZnAaLeDOPAS2w at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
>     Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the specific
>     laws of the local country/countries involved.
>
>     HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>
>     Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to coordinate
>     if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
>     any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
>     identify the patient.
>
>     And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
>     due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
>     rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     frequencies can transmit further.
>
>     Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     https://itg.nu/
>     GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
>     DCB1191A
>     Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 <tel:%2B1-703-493-0128> / Twitter:
>     ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>
>
>     On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>     > From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >
>     > Dear All,
>     >
>     > I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that
>     HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android
>     phones.I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and what
>     technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
>     other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited
>     resource organisation
>     >
>     > Thanks,
>     > Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 4
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 10:17:57 +0800
>     From: Martin Johnson <greatfire at greatfire.org
>     <mailto:greatfire at greatfire.org>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Qihoo 360 in China.
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CAC5hmYhCE+_a-_cnmAORgPGpKp0Efef0T8zeuJNisw+fLpCdKw at mail.gmail.com <mailto:CAC5hmYhCE%2B_a-_cnmAORgPGpKp0Efef0T8zeuJNisw%2BfLpCdKw at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
>     Thanks for sharing Melissa. Around 27% of Internet users in China
>     use the
>     Qihoo "Safe Browser". After the man-in-the-middle attack on GitHub
>     in China
>     just over a month ago, we made some tests accessing websites with
>     invalid
>     SSL certificates in different browsers. The Qihoo browser shows a
>     green
>     check suggesting that the website is safe (
>     https://en.greatfire.org/blog/2013/jan/china-github-and-man-middle).
>     I also
>     noticed how, when installing the browser, Qihoo attempts to add a
>     range of
>     other software. And, even without browsing, it starts sending data
>     to lots
>     of different IP addresses. Investigating what is sent to where is
>     on our
>     list of things to do.
>
>     Martin Johnson
>     Founder of GreatFire.org | FreeWeibo.com | Unblock.cn.com
>     <http://Unblock.cn.com>
>     PGP key <https://en.greatfire.org/contact>
>
>
>     On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 at 5:50 AM, Melissa Chan <mchan02 at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:mchan02 at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>
>     > Good afternoon,
>     >
>     > Thought Qihoo's mysterious activities, written up in this piece
>     by Tech in
>     > Asia, might be of interest to those on this list.  It looks like
>     the team
>     > there is continuing the investigation -- apparently there's a
>     weird cookie
>     > file that gets sent to a Qihoo server every time a user opens
>     IE.  Anyone
>     > interested in helping or learning more should email:
>     >
>     > editors(at)techinasia(dot).com
>     >
>     > Cheers,
>     >
>     > Melissa
>     >
>     >
>     > Melissa Chan  |  Correspondent  |  Al Jazeera English  ||  John
>     S. Knight
>     > Journalism Fellow  |  Stanford University
>     > email  | mchan02 at stanford.edu <mailto:mchan02 at stanford.edu>  |
>      twitter  |  @melissakchan  |  mobile
>     >  | 909.618.5287 <tel:909.618.5287>
>     >
>     >
>     > Link:
>     >
>     http://www.techinasia.com/massive-expose-blasts-qihoo-360-cancer-internet/
>     >
>     >
>     > Expose Blasts Qihoo 360 as ?Cancer of the Internet?; Qihoo Denies
>     >
>     Everything<http://www.techinasia.com/massive-expose-blasts-qihoo-360-cancer-internet/>
>     >
>     > China?s Qihoo 360 <http://techinasia.com/tag/qihoo-360> has a lot of
>     > enemies. I?m not just talking about
>     Baidu<http://techinasia.com/tag/baidu>,
>     > either; lots of net users dislike the company for its dirty
>     tactics<http://www.techinasia.com/360-safe-browser-malware/> and
>     > China?s State Administration for Industry and Commerce (SAIC)
>     has printed
>     >
>     publicly<http://www.saic.gov.cn/ywdt/gsyw/dfdt/xxb/201301/t20130130_133021.html>
>     that
>     > the company has engaged in behaviors most people would call
>     fraudulent<http://www.techinasia.com/qihoo-committing-fraud-google-making-huge-mistake/>.
>     > But a recent expose conducted by an independent investigator and
>     printed
>     > in the *National Business
>     Daily*<http://www.nbd.com.cn/features/273?preview=true>?
>     > supposedly the result of months of investigation ? suggests that
>     Qihoo is
>     > doing an awful lot more than most of its users are even aware of.
>     >
>     > The *National Business Daily* (hereafter: *NBD*) report presents a
>     > laundry list of accusations about Qihoo software, backing many
>     of them up
>     > with illustrated screenshots demonstrating what?s going on
>     behind the
>     > scenes. Among the many allegations: that Qihoo?s 360 Safe
>     Browser contains
>     > a massive security flaw that messes with users Windows DLL
>     files, that it
>     > can expose users? passwords, that it tells users sketchy online
>     payment
>     > sites are safe, and that it is making connections the user isn?t
>     aware of
>     > even when it?s just loading a blank page. The report also
>     contains more
>     > familiar charges like Qihoo products masquerading as official
>     Microsoft
>     > patches, forcibly deleting competitor products as ?unsafe?, etc.
>     >
>     > Qihoo 360 has categorically denied all of the allegations
>     contained in the
>     > report in a post on its official BBS
>     forums<http://bbs.360safe.com/thread-602169-1-1.html>.
>     > From Qihoo?s official translation of its response, provided to
>     *Tech in
>     > Asia*by a Qihoo representative:
>     >
>     > The article appears to be an ?aggregation? of most of the past false
>     > allegations and claims made by our competitors and our foes. It
>     takes those
>     > claims from sources such as an ?anonymous individual?, a person
>     who lost a
>     > lawsuit against us, and a former malware/virus creator, without
>     any basic
>     > fact checking. It also completely ignores all the clarification and
>     > statements Qihoo 360 has made regarding these false claims, and
>     even ignore
>     > [sic] high-profile court rulings in the past, in order to
>     portrait [sic] a
>     > totally biased story against Qihoo 360. We are not surprised
>     that someone
>     > hates us so much that it [sic] keeps record of all those [sic]
>     garbage and
>     > is willing to recycle it in the public domain over and over
>     again. It is
>     > not difficult to conclude that there has to be huge economic
>     interest of
>     > our foes behind such [an] outrageous attack. We take it very
>     seriously!
>     >
>     > In its statement, Qihoo also says that it has filed a complaint
>     against *
>     > NBD* with GAPP (a government organ that regulates the press) and
>     that it
>     > plans to sue *NBD* in court, and will additionally sue ?anyone who
>     > intentionally spreads such rumor for defamation.?
>     >
>     > When asked to respond directly to specific allegations contained
>     in the
>     > report, a representative from Qihoo refused, saying that previously
>     > published statements should serve as a sufficient response to
>     any questions
>     > the report raises. Later, however, the company did publish a
>     number of
>     > clarifications
>     <http://tech.sina.com.cn/i/2013-02-28/20578099689.shtml> that
>     > directly address some of the report?s specific allegations.
>     >
>     > It is clear that Qihoo?s management considers this report and other
>     > ?attacks? to be related to its competitors. In a public statement
>     > yesterday
>     <http://tech.sina.com.cn/i/2013-02-28/20578099689.shtml>, Qihoo
>     > CEO Zhou Hongyi <http://techinasia.com/tag/zhou-hongyi> told
>     reporters
>     > that the report and others like it were related to Qihoo?s
>     decision to enter
>     > the search engine
>     field<http://www.techinasia.com/qihoo-360-search-engine/>.
>     > Zhou said that the *NBD* report was an attempt to ?smear? Qihoo.
>     ?I think
>     > that the essence of this is that 360 decided to take on the big
>     players in
>     > China,? he said, ?as long as we keep doing search, these kind of
>     smear
>     > attacks will continue.?
>     >
>     > Qihoo representatives declined to produce any evidence backing
>     up the
>     > implication that its competitors are somehow behind the *NBD*
>     report. A
>     > Qihoo representative did link me to this
>     article<http://bbs.tianya.cn/post-itinfo-215810-1.shtml>,
>     > which suggests that several of the sources in the *NBD* report
>     are being
>     > paid by Tencent <http://techinasia.com/tag/tencent>to publish
>     attacks
>     > about Qihoo. However, the article contains no evidence to
>     support these
>     > claims, and its author is an anonymous Tianya user identified
>     only as
>     > shengsheng72011 <http://www.tianya.cn/57321557>.
>     >
>     > After an extended exchange of emails with *Tech in Asia*, a Qihoo
>     > representative implied that Qihoo does have evidence its
>     competitors are
>     > behind the *NBD* piece, but declined to share any, writing: ?Sorry
>     > mister, the evidences are for the court proceedings.?
>     >
>     > Although it obviously doesn?t contain any evidence of a
>     connection to
>     > Qihoo competitors, the*NBD* report *does* admit that the independent
>     > investigator making these claims is biased ? he told the *NBD* he is
>     > openly opposed to Qihoo 360, which he considers a ?cancer? that
>     should be
>     > ?cut out? from the internet. His fundamental beef with the
>     company comes
>     > from what he interprets to be its frequent violation of the
>     principle of
>     > least
>     privilege<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principle_of_least_privilege>.
>     > Least privilege is a widely accepted computer programming
>     concept that says
>     > that any given program should only be automatically given access
>     to what it
>     > *needs* to access to function. Qihoo, the investigator says,
>     breaks this
>     > principle frequently.
>     >
>     > (You can think about ?least privilege? sort of like a repair
>     man: if he
>     > shows up to your house and you aren?t home to let him in, he?ll
>     generally
>     > just come back later instead of breaking in on his own. Software
>     that
>     > ignores the principle of least privilege is more like a repair
>     man who just
>     > walks into your house and starts making repairs whether you?re
>     home and
>     > aware of his visit or not. The investigator who spoke with the
>     *NBD* put
>     > it even more bluntly: Qihoo is like a residential manager who,
>     when he gets
>     > reports of a dog barking, just breaks into the house and shoots
>     the dog. In
>     > other words, the investigator is saying Qihoo?s software does
>     way too much
>     > in the background without making it clear what is happening and
>     asking the
>     > users? permission.)
>     >
>     > Of course, the principle of least privilege is not a law, and
>     even if
>     > Qihoo?s software is violating it, there isn?t necessarily
>     anything illegal
>     > about that. It does, however, raise privacy concerns for some
>     users. Qihoo
>     > representatives refused to respond to a direct query about
>     whether or not
>     > the company?s software violates the principle of least privilege.
>     >
>     > As with most things relating to Qihoo these days, the *NBD*
>     report has
>     > spiraled into a pretty ugly he-said she-said mess. We?re a bit
>     tired of
>     > that story here at *Tech in Asia*, so in the coming weeks, we?ll be
>     > conducting our own investigation into Qihoo?s applications to
>     try to assess
>     > what, if anything, they are doing wrong.
>     >
>     > If you have expertise in web security and would like to assist
>     in our
>     > investigation, please get it touch with us:
>     editors(at)techinasia(dot)com.
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
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>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 5
>     Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 18:15:43 -0800
>     From: "Sky (Jim Schuyler)" <sky at red7.com <mailto:sky at red7.com>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID: <2ED34AB4-BE47-47C0-8917-5785DFDDE830 at red7.com
>     <mailto:2ED34AB4-BE47-47C0-8917-5785DFDDE830 at red7.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>     Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android
>     app wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur
>     radio remotely, and there is software available to do this.
>     However, I'm not sure what benefit it would bring to this project.
>
>     In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in
>     "clear text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want
>     to try to exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it.
>     In other countries it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info
>     in the clear, so I'd suggest avoiding this.
>
>     Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient
>     bandwidth to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in
>     theory, but in general amateur radio operators restrict their
>     bandwidth and the maximum usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud.
>     i.e. very slow.
>
>     -Sky  AA6AX
>
>     - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - -
>     Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     Phone: +1.415.759.7337 <tel:%2B1.415.759.7337>
>     PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>
>     On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com
>     <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>> wrote:
>
>     > Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the
>     specific
>     > laws of the local country/countries involved.
>     >
>     > HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     > authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>     >
>     > Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to
>     coordinate
>     > if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
>     > any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
>     > identify the patient.
>     >
>     > And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
>     > due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
>     > rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     > frequencies can transmit further.
>     >
>     > Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>     >
>     >
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     > -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     > ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     > https://itg.nu/
>     > GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     > Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
>     DCB1191A
>     > Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 <tel:%2B1-703-493-0128> / Twitter:
>     ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     > http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>     >
>     >
>     > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>     >> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >>
>     >> Dear All,
>     >>
>     >> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that
>     HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android
>     phones.I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and what
>     technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
>     other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited
>     resource organisation
>     >>
>     >> Thanks,
>     >> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
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>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 6
>     Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 20:26:37 -0800
>     From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>
>     To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: Anders Albrechtslund <alb at hum.au.dk <mailto:alb at hum.au.dk>>,
>     Torin Monahan
>             <torin.monahan at unc.edu <mailto:torin.monahan at unc.edu>>
>     Subject: [liberationtech] CfP: 4S,      "Surveillance & Big Data
>     Mediation"
>             (March 15)
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CANhci9GuBzQ51GmWLq3KLWAQLL5cCeNeAJ1F7NfVfebpNeAnqg at mail.gmail.com <mailto:CANhci9GuBzQ51GmWLq3KLWAQLL5cCeNeAJ1F7NfVfebpNeAnqg at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
>     From: Torin Monahan <torin.monahan at unc.edu
>     <mailto:torin.monahan at unc.edu>>, Anders Albrechtslund
>     <alb at hum.au.dk <mailto:alb at hum.au.dk>>
>
>     Call for Papers (w/ apologies for cross-listing)
>
>     Surveillance and the Mediation of Big Data
>
>     4S session(s) organized by Torin Monahan and Anders Albrechtslund
>
>     4S Annual Meeting (http://www.4sonline.org/meeting)
>     San Diego, CA
>     October 9 - 12, 2013
>
>     The ?big data? paradigm signals an intensification and distribution of
>     algorithmic surveillance across multiple organizational and
>     geographical scales. More than an exponential advancement in storage
>     and processing capacity, big data currently operates as a fluid
>     metaphor for the potential of data analytics to intelligently predict
>     and respond to the needs of individuals and institutions. Clearly STS
>     inquiry could fruitfully deconstruct the technological deterministic
>     slant of discourses surrounding big data so that attention could be
>     drawn to the values being inscribed in algorithms, the profound
>     materiality of cloud computing, the control dimensions of pervasive
>     software, and the active cultivation of new subjectivities as people
>     come to understand themselves through their data doubles. Surveillance
>     is key to these processes, as the capture and processing of data is
>     frequently oriented toward some form of intervention or control.
>     Rather than viewing surveillance through big data as completely
>     automated or neutral processes, this panel seeks to investigate the
>     many forms of mediation and politics inherent in big-data
>     applications.
>
>     Possible areas of inquiry might include:
>     ?      Data fusion, profiling, and prediction by security
>     organizations.
>     ?      The crafting of new subjectivities as individuals embrace
>     ?quantified self? movements.
>     ?      The social and political effects of ?filter bubbles? erected by
>     various search platforms.
>     ?      Gamification of interaction with customers and clients as
>     public and private organizations seek to capitalize on (and control)
>     user involvement.
>     ?      Activist and civil-society harnessing of data repositories and
>     sensing devices to achieve progressive outcomes.
>     ?      The optimization of urban infrastructures through ?smart?
>     information technologies.
>     ?      Health technologies used for documentation, analyses,
>     predictions and recommendations.
>
>     Please email titles, abstracts, and institutional affiliations to
>     Torin Monahan <torin.monahan at unc.edu
>     <mailto:torin.monahan at unc.edu>> and Anders Albrechtslund
>     <alb at hum.au.dk <mailto:alb at hum.au.dk>> by March 15, 2013.
>
>
>     Torin Monahan, Ph.D.
>     Associate Editor, Surveillance & Society
>     Associate Professor
>     Dept. of Communication Studies
>     The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
>     www.torinmonahan.com <http://www.torinmonahan.com>
>     NEW BOOK: SuperVision: An Introduction to the Surveillance Society
>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 7
>     Date: Tue, 5 Mar 2013 23:33:09 -0500
>     From: Louis Su?rez-Potts <luispo at gmail.com <mailto:luispo at gmail.com>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: [liberationtech] F2C
>     Message-ID: <0C159730-98A0-400F-9D6C-6638850416D3 at gmail.com
>     <mailto:0C159730-98A0-400F-9D6C-6638850416D3 at gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>     The Freedom to Connect conference ended today.[0] It was held in
>     Silver Spring, MD.
>
>     I also seemed immensely interesting and relevant to this list. Amy
>     Goodman's Democracy Now! broadcast much of it; she also
>     interviewed several interesting participants.[1]
>
>     But who on this list was there? And if you were there, can you
>     summarize or relate what you found interesting? At least, that is,
>     in terms of promulgating lib tech.
>
>     Thanks
>     louis
>
>     [0] http://freedom-to-connect.net/
>     [1] http://www.democracynow.org/ (Monday's show is featured at the
>     bottom of the page; Tuesday's, 5 Mar., closer to the top.)
>
>
>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 8
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 07:14:46 -0800
>     From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>
>     To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: Christine Hine <christine.hine at btinternet.com
>     <mailto:christine.hine at btinternet.com>>
>     Subject: [liberationtech] Mixed methods Internet research
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CANhci9EsUWAsd0Fn3vHEq+eA__HTo=iHBi4GYuQY_9cp9fQopA at mail.gmail.com <mailto:iHBi4GYuQY_9cp9fQopA at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>     From: Christine Hine <christine.hine at btinternet.com
>     <mailto:christine.hine at btinternet.com>>
>
>     I'm currently writing a review article on mixed methods Internet
>     research,
>     and I'd really appreciate suggestions I might have overlooked of
>     examples
>     where researchers combine qualitative and quantitative methods, or
>     large-scale and small-scale research designs in understanding Internet
>     phenomenon. I'm looking, for example, for instances where researchers
>     combine analysis of log file data, or twitter traffic etc with an
>     in-depth
>     ethnographic or interview-based study. I'm also interested in
>     mixed mode
>     studies, which combine online and offline research or use both
>     born-digital
>     data and studies rooted in offline settings to answer a single
>     research
>     question. Any suggestions gratefully received - I'm happy to take
>     replies
>     offlist and then share the outcomes with the list.
>
>     Best wishes,
>
>     Christine
>     Christine Hine
>     Department of Sociology
>     University of Surrey
>     Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7NX, UK
>     c.hine at surrey.ac.uk <mailto:c.hine at surrey.ac.uk>
>     <https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca03
>     8&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk
>     <https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca03%0A8&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk>>
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>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 9
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 07:17:03 -0800
>     From: Katy P <katycarvt at gmail.com <mailto:katycarvt at gmail.com>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Mixed methods Internet research
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CADBMUMGVueNozXnLpO5MQF-Frpif3MdH9LkT6PFPHk7g3ceiPg at mail.gmail.com <mailto:CADBMUMGVueNozXnLpO5MQF-Frpif3MdH9LkT6PFPHk7g3ceiPg at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>     To toot my own horn, here's a study I did last year
>     http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01633.x/full
>
>
>
>     On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 at 7:14 AM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>wrote:
>
>     > From: Christine Hine <christine.hine at btinternet.com
>     <mailto:christine.hine at btinternet.com>>
>     >
>     > I'm currently writing a review article on mixed methods Internet
>     research,
>     > and I'd really appreciate suggestions I might have overlooked of
>     examples
>     > where researchers combine qualitative and quantitative methods, or
>     > large-scale and small-scale research designs in understanding
>     Internet
>     > phenomenon. I'm looking, for example, for instances where
>     researchers
>     > combine analysis of log file data, or twitter traffic etc with
>     an in-depth
>     > ethnographic or interview-based study. I'm also interested in
>     mixed mode
>     > studies, which combine online and offline research or use both
>     born-digital
>     > data and studies rooted in offline settings to answer a single
>     research
>     > question. Any suggestions gratefully received - I'm happy to
>     take replies
>     > offlist and then share the outcomes with the list.
>     >
>     > Best wishes,
>     >
>     > Christine
>     > Christine Hine
>     > Department of Sociology
>     > University of Surrey
>     > Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7NX, UK
>     > c.hine at surrey.ac.uk <mailto:c.hine at surrey.ac.uk>
>     > <
>     >
>     https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca03
>     > 8&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk
>     <http://40surrey.ac.uk><https://email.surrey.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=ef59d54d448441028a5438f2cc7ca038&URL=mailto%3ac.hine%40surrey.ac.uk>
>     > >
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
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>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 10
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 08:29:54 -0800
>     From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>
>     To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: "David S. Isenberg" <isen at isen.com <mailto:isen at isen.com>>
>     Subject: [liberationtech] F2C Videos are up!
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CANhci9EqGxTXVouNhF1XUkbuvdYKPoFBU-=PrWPD4-6fiPeR=w at mail.gmail.com <mailto:w at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
>     From: David S. Isenberg <isen at isen.com <mailto:isen at isen.com>>
>
>     Thanks to the Internet Society, especially Joly McFie, Paul Brigner,
>     Paul Hyland and Paul Franz, the approximately complete video
>     archive of F2C: Freedom to Connect for 2013 is now up at
>     http://new.livestream.com/internetsociety/f2c for your viewing
>     pleasure and/or convenient surveillance.
>
>     If you were not able to come, we hope to see you next year!
>     If you were able to come, please stay tuned to the attendee-only
>     list for important exclusive information critical to the protection
>     of the free, open Internet. [Non-attendees may obtain a copy of
>     a completely legal image of the entire proceedings from
>     AT&T, Room 641A, 611 Folsom Street, San Francisco CA 94107.]
>
>     If you care about the free, open Internet -- and media democracy
>     in general -- you will not want to miss the National Conference
>     for Media Reform in Denver, April 4-7. I'm going. Wouldn't miss
>     it.
>
>     http://conference.freepress.net/ncmr-2013
>
>     Check out some of the amazing speakers! (F2C should be so lucky.)
>     http://conference.freepress.net/presenters
>
>     CU at F2C14 if we can keep the Internet open for one more year!
>     David I
>     ------------------
>     203-661-4798 (main number, follows me everywhere)
>     888-isen.com <http://888-isen.com> (toll free)
>     Twitter: @davidisen
>     http://isen.com/blog
>     ------------------
>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 11
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 09:40:09 -0700
>     From: a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>
>     To: "liberationtech" <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: sandraordonez at openitp.org <mailto:sandraordonez at openitp.org>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>             LibTech Community
>     Message-ID:
>     <00fcb1fc0c3d40f0b9fc0bfda415e8f4.squirrel at mail.secdev.ca
>     <mailto:00fcb1fc0c3d40f0b9fc0bfda415e8f4.squirrel at mail.secdev.ca>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain;charset=utf-8
>
>     I'd be interested to join.
>
>     Saludos,
>     Antoine
>
>
>     > If there is enough interest, we could create a Spanish-speaking
>     list.
>     > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
>     > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
>     >
>     > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira
>     <edulix at wadobo.com <mailto:edulix at wadobo.com>>
>     > wrote:
>     >> Hello there!
>     >>
>     >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are there, but
>     >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm the
>     lead
>     >> developer of agoravoting.com <http://agoravoting.com>, an
>     e-democracy voting tool with support
>     >> for vote delegation.
>     >>
>     >> Regards,
>     >> --
>     >> Eduardo Robles Elvira     +34 668 824 393  skype: edulix2
>     >> http://www.wadobo.com    it's not magic, it's wadobo!
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>
>
>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 12
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 19:17:03 +0000 (GMT)
>     From: "Daniel H. Cabrera" <danhcab at yahoo.es <mailto:danhcab at yahoo.es>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: "sandraordonez at openitp.org <mailto:sandraordonez at openitp.org>"
>     <sandraordonez at openitp.org <mailto:sandraordonez at openitp.org>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>             LibTech Community
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <1362597423.96247.YahooMailNeo at web172201.mail.ir2.yahoo.com
>     <mailto:1362597423.96247.YahooMailNeo at web172201.mail.ir2.yahoo.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>     interesado
>
>     ?
>     Daniel H. Cabrera Altieri
>     Profesor Titular de Teor?a de la Comunicaci?n
>     Coordinador del Grado en Periodismo
>
>     Facultad de Filosof?a y Letras
>     Universidad de Zaragoza
>     Te. (34) 976761000 ext. 4043
>     c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12 - Zaragoza- 50009
>     Espa?a
>
>
>
>
>
>     ________________________________
>      De: "a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>"
>     <a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>>
>     Para: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     CC: sandraordonez at openitp.org <mailto:sandraordonez at openitp.org>
>     Enviado: Mi?rcoles 6 de marzo de 2013 17:40
>     Asunto: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>     LibTech Community
>
>     I'd be interested to join.
>
>     Saludos,
>     Antoine
>
>
>     > If there is enough interest, we could create a Spanish-speaking
>     list.
>     > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
>     > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
>     >
>     > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira
>     <edulix at wadobo.com <mailto:edulix at wadobo.com>>
>     > wrote:
>     >> Hello there!
>     >>
>     >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are there, but
>     >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm the
>     lead
>     >> developer of agoravoting.com <http://agoravoting.com>, an
>     e-democracy voting tool with support
>     >> for vote delegation.
>     >>
>     >> Regards,
>     >> --
>     >> Eduardo Robles Elvira? ?  +34 668 824 393? ? ? ? ? ? skype: edulix2
>     >> http://www.wadobo.com? ? it's not magic, it's wadobo!
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>
>
>     --
>     Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password
>     by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     -------------- next part --------------
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>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 13
>     Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2013 14:44:00 -0500
>     From: Sandra <SandraOrdonez at openitp.org
>     <mailto:SandraOrdonez at openitp.org>>
>     To: "Daniel H. Cabrera" <danhcab at yahoo.es <mailto:danhcab at yahoo.es>>
>     Cc: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>             LibTech Community
>     Message-ID: <51379C80.3060805 at openitp.org
>     <mailto:51379C80.3060805 at openitp.org>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>     Yah esta :)
>
>     On 3/6/13 2:17 PM, Daniel H. Cabrera wrote:
>     > interesado
>     >
>     > Daniel H. Cabrera Altieri
>     > Profesor Titular de Teor?a de la Comunicaci?n
>     > Coordinador del Grado en Periodismo
>     >
>     > Facultad de Filosof?a y Letras
>     > Universidad de Zaragoza
>     > Te. (34) 976761000 ext. 4043
>     > c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12 - Zaragoza- 50009
>     > Espa?a
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     > *De:* "a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>"
>     <a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>>
>     > *Para:* liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     > *CC:* sandraordonez at openitp.org <mailto:sandraordonez at openitp.org>
>     > *Enviado:* Mi?rcoles 6 de marzo de 2013 17:40
>     > *Asunto:* Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>     > LibTech Community
>     >
>     > I'd be interested to join.
>     >
>     > Saludos,
>     > Antoine
>     >
>     >
>     > > If there is enough interest, we could create a
>     Spanish-speaking list.
>     > > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
>     > > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
>     > >
>     > > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira
>     > <edulix at wadobo.com <mailto:edulix at wadobo.com>
>     <mailto:edulix at wadobo.com <mailto:edulix at wadobo.com>>>
>     > > wrote:
>     > >> Hello there!
>     > >>
>     > >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are
>     there, but
>     > >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm
>     the lead
>     > >> developer of agoravoting.com <http://agoravoting.com>, an
>     e-democracy voting tool with support
>     > >> for vote delegation.
>     > >>
>     > >> Regards,
>     > >> --
>     > >> Eduardo Robles Elvira    +34 668 824 393    skype: edulix2
>     > >> http://www.wadobo.com <http://www.wadobo.com/>    it's not magic,
>     > it's wadobo!
>     > >> --
>     > >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>
>     > <mailto:companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> or
>     changing your settings at
>     > >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     > > --
>     > > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>
>     > <mailto:companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> or
>     changing your settings at
>     > > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     > >
>     >
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>
>     > <mailto:companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> or
>     changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     >
>
>
>     --
>     Sandra Ordonez
>     Community Outreach Manager
>     Open Internet Tools Project
>     @OpenITP
>
>     -------------- next part --------------
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>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 14
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 15:08:25 -0500
>     From: Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com
>     <mailto:ali at packetknife.com>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>,
>     dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CAPKVt5KXKYw=ecU6=QJztFkbfJ+=+fnE4FHznf4HLmit9HSCiQ at mail.gmail.com <mailto:fnE4FHznf4HLmit9HSCiQ at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>     I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other
>     problems
>     at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
>
>     Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
>     re-deploy
>     without a telco or other licensing.
>
>     I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
>     http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated
>     deck of
>     shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field option?
>     About
>     as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario -
>     it might
>     just work. -Ali
>
>
>
>     On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com
>     <mailto:sky at red7.com>> wrote:
>
>     > Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android app
>     > wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
>     > remotely, and there is software available to do this. However,
>     I'm not sure
>     > what benefit it would bring to this project.
>     >
>     > In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in
>     "clear
>     > text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to try to
>     > exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In other
>     countries
>     > it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear, so I'd
>     > suggest avoiding this.
>     >
>     > Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient
>     bandwidth to
>     > transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory, but
>     in general
>     > amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and the maximum
>     usable
>     > transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
>     >
>     > -Sky  AA6AX
>     >
>     > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - - -
>     > Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     > -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     > Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     > Phone: +1.415.759.7337
>     > PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>     >
>     > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com
>     <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>> wrote:
>     >
>     > Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the
>     specific
>     > laws of the local country/countries involved.
>     >
>     > HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     > authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>     >
>     > Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to
>     coordinate
>     > if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
>     > any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
>     > identify the patient.
>     >
>     > And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
>     > due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
>     > rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     > frequencies can transmit further.
>     >
>     > Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     > -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     > ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     > https://itg.nu/
>     > GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     > Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint: AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A
>     DCB1191A
>     > Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     > http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>     >
>     >
>     > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>
>     > wrote:
>     >
>     > From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >
>     > Dear All,
>     >
>     > I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with
>     > poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to
>     > unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio software
>     from
>     > HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to know
>     whether
>     > these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be
>     used for
>     > communication used for voice communication between health workers
>     > themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally
>     permissible and
>     > what technical requirements will be needed to set up such
>     system. The other
>     > alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi
>     > hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource
>     organisation
>     >
>     > Thanks,
>     > Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
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>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 15
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 13:09:29 -0800
>     From: "Sky (Jim Schuyler)" <sky at red7.com <mailto:sky at red7.com>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID: <3CC26F4A-0292-457F-9F1E-38E13BA36D35 at red7.com
>     <mailto:3CC26F4A-0292-457F-9F1E-38E13BA36D35 at red7.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>
>     Your APRS idea is interesting and I only know it from the
>     "positioning" side, not from passing any text, so you may want to
>     continue looking into it. I do not know that APRS is currently
>     passing any traffic other than positions, at least as used in the
>     US. I also do not know whether it's used outside the US. Please do
>     remember that APRS and most other amateur digital service are not
>     designed to be "reliable" which means they may not "try again" to
>     pass a message and the message may become garbled in transmission.
>     Some do attempt to error-correct, but not most.
>
>     Some more observations on your criteria:
>
>     Low-cost: maybe. Each operator has to have equipment which
>     generally runs USD$500 to many thousands. Also Android is low cost
>     if you have some kind of connection to the radio operator. So the
>     "last mile" or "first mile" depending on how you look at it, is
>     not expensive. But you said tribal areas, so I don't know what
>     your challenges would be on that count.
>
>     Reliable: amateur radio has varying reliability, and it is easily
>     interfered with if someone wants to do that. In planning emergency
>     operations we take into account that there may be malicious
>     interference even during an emergency. Even most amateur radio
>     digital protocols do not have very robust error-correction, so
>     they're a bit iffy.
>
>     Easiest to expand: maybe and maybe not. You have to have a stable
>     of radio operators available both locally and remotely. (Presuming
>     you want information to go from somewhere to somewhere.)
>
>     Without a telco: Yes for the amateur portion at least.
>
>     Without licensing: Although I encourage folks to become amateur
>     radio operators, they do need to be licensed. The government that
>     giveth it can taketh it away at the stroke of a pen. I will skip
>     saying more right now.
>
>     Also I note in your original statement that you are talking about
>     "tribal areas" with poor connectivity. Your challenge is going to
>     be getting your signal from the tribal area to a reliable amateur
>     radio operator. That's unless the radio operator is already in the
>     tribal area. If the cell phone can's connect, then amateur VHF and
>     UHF probably wouldn't work either, so you'd have to rely upon HF
>     with longer range but much greater variability in terms of signal
>     propagation.
>
>     >
>
>     Keep in mind that amateur radio is a point-to-point service
>     subject to the vagaries of radio propagation. In other words,
>     there is no reliable path 24/7 from one point to another unless
>     you're using prearranged VHF or UHF frequencies and line of sight
>     propagation. Commonly for emergency ops we arrange all of this in
>     advance and have emergency power and operators trained, and
>     frequencies and modes chosen. For HF propagation there is no
>     guarantee your message will get through because "the bands may be
>     dead."
>
>     We've been thinking here (San Francisco) of linking amateur packet
>     radio with local mesh wi-fi (see Byzantium Project for example) to
>     transfer some traffic in semi-automated ways during emergency, but
>     this is a long way from actual implementation. The Byzantium folks
>     are on this list and can comment.
>
>     HF: high frequency (meaning roughly 1mHz to many gHz, which is
>     reliant upon ionospheric conditions for signal propagation
>     VHF: very high frequency (generally 100mHz to 150mHz) line of
>     sight mostly, with repeaters being generally used
>     UHF: ultra? (generally 200mHz and up) line of sight mostly, and
>     repeaters
>     APRS: Automatic Packet Reporting System (a digital
>     position-reportig protocol used on certain amateur frequencies)
>
>     - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - -
>     Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     Phone: +1.415.759.7337
>     PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>
>     On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:08 PM, Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com
>     <mailto:ali at packetknife.com>> wrote:
>
>     > I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the
>     other problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
>     >
>     > Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
>     re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
>     >
>     > I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS
>     (http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated
>     deck of shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field
>     option? About as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst
>     case scenario - it might just work. -Ali
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com
>     <mailto:sky at red7.com>> wrote:
>     > Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android
>     app wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur
>     radio remotely, and there is software available to do this.
>     However, I'm not sure what benefit it would bring to this project.
>     >
>     > In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in
>     "clear text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want
>     to try to exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it.
>     In other countries it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info
>     in the clear, so I'd suggest avoiding this.
>     >
>     > Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient
>     bandwidth to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in
>     theory, but in general amateur radio operators restrict their
>     bandwidth and the maximum usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud.
>     i.e. very slow.
>     >
>     > -Sky  AA6AX
>     >
>     > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - - -
>     > Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     > -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     > Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     > Phone: +1.415.759.7337
>     > PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>     >
>     > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com
>     <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>> wrote:
>     >
>     >> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the
>     specific
>     >> laws of the local country/countries involved.
>     >>
>     >> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     >> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>     >>
>     >> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to
>     coordinate
>     >> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
>     >> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
>     >> identify the patient.
>     >>
>     >> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
>     >> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
>     >> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     >> frequencies can transmit further.
>     >>
>     >> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>     >>
>     >>
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     >> -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     >> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     >> https://itg.nu/
>     >> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     >> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint:
>     AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
>     >> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     >> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>     >>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >>>
>     >>> Dear All,
>     >>>
>     >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that
>     HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android
>     phones.I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and what
>     technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
>     other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited
>     resource organisation
>     >>>
>     >>> Thanks,
>     >>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>     -------------- next part --------------
>     An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
>     URL:
>     <http://mailman.stanford.edu/pipermail/liberationtech/attachments/20130306/66d9fe43/attachment-0001.html>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 16
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 16:23:17 -0500
>     From: Louis Su?rez-Potts <luispo at gmail.com <mailto:luispo at gmail.com>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: "David S. Isenberg" <isen at isen.com <mailto:isen at isen.com>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] F2C Videos are up!
>     Message-ID: <0F762DE3-2469-482F-9EEA-46C9F060E6E5 at gmail.com
>     <mailto:0F762DE3-2469-482F-9EEA-46C9F060E6E5 at gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>     Hey, thanks!
>     I'll do my best to further promulgate these.
>     BTW, I had not been aware of the Denver conference. It's likely
>     too late for me to go, but will track it, if possible, with the
>     aid of the free Internet. :-)
>
>     Cheers
>     louis
>
>
>     On 13-03-06, at 11:29 , Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>
>     > From: David S. Isenberg <isen at isen.com <mailto:isen at isen.com>>
>     >
>     > Thanks to the Internet Society, especially Joly McFie, Paul Brigner,
>     > Paul Hyland and Paul Franz, the approximately complete video
>     > archive of F2C: Freedom to Connect for 2013 is now up at
>     > http://new.livestream.com/internetsociety/f2c for your viewing
>     > pleasure and/or convenient surveillance.
>     >
>     > If you were not able to come, we hope to see you next year!
>     > If you were able to come, please stay tuned to the attendee-only
>     > list for important exclusive information critical to the protection
>     > of the free, open Internet. [Non-attendees may obtain a copy of
>     > a completely legal image of the entire proceedings from
>     > AT&T, Room 641A, 611 Folsom Street, San Francisco CA 94107.]
>     >
>     > If you care about the free, open Internet -- and media democracy
>     > in general -- you will not want to miss the National Conference
>     > for Media Reform in Denver, April 4-7. I'm going. Wouldn't miss
>     > it.
>     >
>     > http://conference.freepress.net/ncmr-2013
>     >
>     > Check out some of the amazing speakers! (F2C should be so lucky.)
>     > http://conference.freepress.net/presenters
>     >
>     > CU at F2C14 if we can keep the Internet open for one more year!
>     > David I
>     > ------------------
>     > 203-661-4798 (main number, follows me everywhere)
>     > 888-isen.com <http://888-isen.com> (toll free)
>     > Twitter: @davidisen
>     > http://isen.com/blog
>     > ------------------
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 17
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 21:36:41 +0000
>     From: Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb <ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org
>     <mailto:ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID: <190F7F4E-F78B-4F07-A8F3-ED9D83A0707F at ei8fdb.org
>     <mailto:190F7F4E-F78B-4F07-A8F3-ED9D83A0707F at ei8fdb.org>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>     -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>     Hash: SHA1
>
>     Dear Dr. Dey:
>
>     Disclosure: I am a licensed amateur radio operator. I am slightly
>     biased. :)
>
>     I have one answer: Amateur radio. Forget mobile phone networks.
>      Amateur radio is cheap, very durable and will provide you with
>     the functions you need, and if you can get access to amateur radio
>     operators in your country, you may have free support for the life
>     of your project!
>
>     If you can tell us the country you wish to set this project up we
>     can possibly help with finding out more about the amateur radio
>     community in the country.
>
>     To answer your questions:
>
>     >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that
>     HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.
>
>     Yes it is downloadable, but as far as I understand (it was the
>     case when I wanted to install and use the software), it requires
>     the person wishing to operate it to send the administrators of the
>     system a copy of their amateur radio licence.
>
>     NB: This could have changed.
>
>     >>> I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff.
>
>     Yes, it would be possible but it would require a) the
>     telecommunications infrastructure for an "IP connection" (either
>     mobile phone network, or WiFi).
>
>     >>> Will it be legally permissible and what technical requirements
>     will be needed to set up such system.
>
>     I understand it is still a "requirement" to produce a valid
>     amateur radio license to get access to the Hamsphere (and similar
>     systems).
>
>     The technical requirements are an Internet connection capable of
>     carrying your amateur radio software messages. Without either a) a
>     mobile phone network, or b) a WiFi (or similar system), c)
>     satellite Internet service this is not possible.
>
>     >>> The other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters
>     or long distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our
>     limited resource organisation
>
>
>     And honestly, would not be a good use of your funds.
>
>     - -----------
>
>     The APRS discussion:
>
>     APRS is still clear text - the only "protection" is that it is a
>     digital mode (it is transported over AX.25, a transmission
>     protocol). Anyone with an APRS modem and amateur radio *could*
>     decode and read the APRS messages.
>
>     End result again is no privacy. Maybe privacy through obscurity.
>
>     APRS is used (in UK and Ireland) regularly for passing short
>     messages, and information objects (weather conditions/temperature
>     in geographical areas, traffic information, movement of rescue
>     teams). I can give you more information if you think it's of interest.
>
>     There is a system called Winlink (in the States I think its called
>     Sailmail?) which can be used to send and receive e-mail, which I
>     think is more what you are thinking about.
>
>     Winlink operates with a similar objective as e-mail - it sends
>     electronic messages to and from stations equipped with Winlink
>     systems. It can be used over HF (frequencies with long distance
>     capabilities). But the requirement for equipment is greater than
>     2-way voice communications.
>
>
>     However, in this case, I would ask: is there really a need for
>     privacy? Or at least is there a need to identify the patient by
>     name, etc?
>
>     Idea:
>     =====
>
>     By European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications (CEPT)
>     regulations and the mirroring bodies in other parts of the world,
>     a non-licensed individual is allowed to operate a licensed amateur
>     radio station in the presence of a license holder. The patient
>     could speak direct to the medical staff to explain their
>     conditions, etc.
>
>
>     Scenario:
>     ========
>     (I don't know if this scenario is feasible or reflects real-life
>     circumstances. If not, please give some more details for discussion)
>
>
>     * A patient goes to the health worker, based with the
>     village/nearest health station, with a health complaint.
>
>     * The health worker needs assistance in helping
>     diagnosis/treatment from his/her headquarters. The health worker
>     has been trained and received an amateur radio licence.
>
>     * They then call the headquarters for more details on the
>     particular patients condition.
>
>     * The health worker does not name the individual, but gives
>     his/her medical background. As the health worker is present, the
>     patient can talk directly to the headquarters and give their
>     information first hand.
>
>     * If necessary the patient can be given a pseudonym for use over
>     the radio system. The patient's real name could be sent via normal
>     means to the headquarters if necessary.
>
>     * The headquarters responds with information for the persons case.
>
>     * The information exchanged is not personally identifiable (I
>     guess you could argue their voice could be used to identify them...).
>
>
>     They are just some ideas as I thought. I would argue the licencing
>     requirements could be adjusted with the assistance of the
>     government departments (usually the "Post and Telegraphs")
>
>     I hope that helps Dr. Dey. I wish you all the best with your
>     project, and I'd be more than happy in helping however I could.
>
>     best regards,
>
>     Bernard / ei8fdb
>
>
>     On 6 Mar 2013, at 20:08, Ali-Reza Anghaie wrote:
>
>     > I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the
>     other problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
>     >
>     > Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
>     re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
>     >
>     > I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS
>     (http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated
>     deck of shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field
>     option? About as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst
>     case scenario - it might just work. -Ali
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler) <sky at red7.com
>     <mailto:sky at red7.com>> wrote:
>     > Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an Android
>     app wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur
>     radio remotely, and there is software available to do this.
>     However, I'm not sure what benefit it would bring to this project.
>     >
>     > In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in
>     "clear text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want
>     to try to exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it.
>     In other countries it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info
>     in the clear, so I'd suggest avoiding this.
>     >
>     > Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient
>     bandwidth to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in
>     theory, but in general amateur radio operators restrict their
>     bandwidth and the maximum usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud.
>     i.e. very slow.
>     >
>     > -Sky  AA6AX
>     >
>     > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - - -
>     > Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     > -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     > Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     > Phone: +1.415.759.7337
>     > PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>     >
>     > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com
>     <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>> wrote:
>     >
>     >> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the
>     specific
>     >> laws of the local country/countries involved.
>     >>
>     >> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     >> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>     >>
>     >> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to
>     coordinate
>     >> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to discuss
>     >> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
>     >> identify the patient.
>     >>
>     >> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM licenses
>     >> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.  Also
>     >> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     >> frequencies can transmit further.
>     >>
>     >> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>     >>
>     >>
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     >> -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     >> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     >> https://itg.nu/
>     >> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     >> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint:
>     AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
>     >> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     >> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>     >>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >>>
>     >>> Dear All,
>     >>>
>     >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that
>     HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android
>     phones.I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and what
>     technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
>     other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited
>     resource organisation
>     >>>
>     >>> Thanks,
>     >>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>     - --------------------------------------
>     Bernard / bluboxthief / ei8fdb
>
>     IO91XM / www.ei8fdb.org <http://www.ei8fdb.org>
>
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>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 18
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 21:51:46 +0000
>     From: Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb <ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org
>     <mailto:ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID: <4213F074-399A-4398-83EA-2E9E3AA8CB79 at ei8fdb.org
>     <mailto:4213F074-399A-4398-83EA-2E9E3AA8CB79 at ei8fdb.org>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>     -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>     Hash: SHA1
>
>     Howdy AA6AX,
>
>     Nice to meet you.
>
>     On 6 Mar 2013, at 21:09, Sky (Jim Schuyler) wrote:
>
>     > Your APRS idea is interesting and I only know it from the
>     "positioning" side, not from passing any text, so you may want to
>     continue looking into it. I do not know that APRS is currently
>     passing any traffic other than positions, at least as used in the
>     US. I also do not know whether it's used outside the US. Please do
>     remember that APRS and most other amateur digital service are not
>     designed to be "reliable" which means they may not "try again" to
>     pass a message and the message may become garbled in transmission.
>     Some do attempt to error-correct, but not most.
>
>     Not strictly true. APRS clients can be configured to send messages
>     and retry for X attempts. Then it will give up.
>
>     Seeing as SMS transmission isn't even guaranteed, I think its a
>     pretty good attempt for a system that has been developed totally
>     for free! :)
>
>
>     > Even most amateur radio digital protocols do not have very
>     robust error-correction, so they're a bit iffy.
>
>     That is true.
>
>     > Easiest to expand: maybe and maybe not. You have to have a
>     stable of radio operators available both locally and remotely.
>     (Presuming you want information to go from somewhere to somewhere.)
>
>     If as Dr. Dey requested both sides of the communications were
>     between health workers and their HQ, you could train up all the
>     health workers and possibly even employ a "net controller"
>     (amateur radio lingo for person who sits in HQ and is in contact
>     with all the field posts) to co-ordinate communications.
>
>
>     > Without licensing: Although I encourage folks to become amateur
>     radio operators, they do need to be licensed. The government that
>     giveth it can taketh it away at the stroke of a pen. I will skip
>     saying more right now.
>
>     I agree. I'd go a bit further even and say a restricted licence
>     now-adays is trivial to receive.
>
>
>     > Also I note in your original statement that you are talking
>     about "tribal areas" with poor connectivity. Your challenge is
>     going to be getting your signal from the tribal area to a reliable
>     amateur radio operator. That's unless the radio operator is
>     already in the tribal area. If the cell phone can's connect, then
>     amateur VHF and UHF probably wouldn't work either, so you'd have
>     to rely upon HF with longer range but much greater variability in
>     terms of signal propagation.
>
>     How much can you build a self-sustaining 2M VHF repeater for
>     now-a-days? :)
>
>
>     > Keep in mind that amateur radio is a point-to-point service
>     subject to the vagaries of radio propagation. In other words,
>     there is no reliable path 24/7 from one point to another unless
>     you're using prearranged VHF or UHF frequencies and line of sight
>     propagation. Commonly for emergency ops we arrange all of this in
>     advance and have emergency power and operators trained, and
>     frequencies and modes chosen. For HF propagation there is no
>     guarantee your message will get through because "the bands may be
>     dead."
>
>     Which is kinda similar when it comes to mobile networks. If it was
>     possible to get a telco to carry out some "corporate social
>     responsability" work and install even just 2G voice that would be
>     something.
>
>     I would argue, you can get a lot more communications bang for buck
>     with some trained amateur radio engineers, and some amateur radio
>     equipment, than spotty 3G coverage.
>
>     Mobile operators work on the premise: when we will make enough
>     money from people, we will install equipment. I'd honestly hope
>     they have a different business model outside of Europe, but I
>     don't think so.
>
>     73's
>
>     /Bernard
>
>
>
>     >
>     > On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:08 PM, Ali-Reza Anghaie
>     <ali at packetknife.com <mailto:ali at packetknife.com>> wrote:
>     >
>     >> I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the
>     other problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
>     >>
>     >> Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
>     re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
>     >>
>     >> I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS
>     (http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated
>     deck of shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field
>     option? About as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst
>     case scenario - it might just work. -Ali
>     >>
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler)
>     <sky at red7.com <mailto:sky at red7.com>> wrote:
>     >> Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an
>     Android app wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an
>     amateur radio remotely, and there is software available to do
>     this. However, I'm not sure what benefit it would bring to this
>     project.
>     >>
>     >> In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information in
>     "clear text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want
>     to try to exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it.
>     In other countries it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info
>     in the clear, so I'd suggest avoiding this.
>     >>
>     >> Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient
>     bandwidth to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in
>     theory, but in general amateur radio operators restrict their
>     bandwidth and the maximum usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud.
>     i.e. very slow.
>     >>
>     >> -Sky  AA6AX
>     >>
>     >> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - - -
>     >> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     >> -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     >> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     >> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
>     >> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>     >>
>     >> On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com
>     <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>> wrote:
>     >>
>     >>> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the
>     specific
>     >>> laws of the local country/countries involved.
>     >>>
>     >>> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     >>> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>     >>>
>     >>> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to
>     coordinate
>     >>> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to
>     discuss
>     >>> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
>     >>> identify the patient.
>     >>>
>     >>> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM
>     licenses
>     >>> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.
>      Also
>     >>> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     >>> frequencies can transmit further.
>     >>>
>     >>> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     >>> -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     >>> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     >>> https://itg.nu/
>     >>> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     >>> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint:
>     AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
>     >>> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     >>> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>     >>>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >>>>
>     >>>> Dear All,
>     >>>>
>     >>>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that
>     HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android
>     phones.I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and what
>     technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
>     other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited
>     resource organisation
>     >>>>
>     >>>> Thanks,
>     >>>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     >>>> --
>     >>>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>     - --------------------------------------
>     Bernard / bluboxthief / ei8fdb
>
>     IO91XM / www.ei8fdb.org <http://www.ei8fdb.org>
>
>     -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
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>
>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 19
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 17:01:19 -0500
>     From: Robert Guerra <rguerra at privaterra.org
>     <mailto:rguerra at privaterra.org>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>             LibTech Community
>     Message-ID: <D4471B86-33B3-419E-9385-E166C431B99A at privaterra.org
>     <mailto:D4471B86-33B3-419E-9385-E166C431B99A at privaterra.org>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>     Aqui presente y interesado en contectar con otros hispanhablantes
>     activo en el tema...
>
>     (here and interested in connecting with other spanish speakers
>     active on this issue)
>
>     Robert
>
>     --
>     R. Guerra
>     Phone/Cell: +1 202-905-2081
>     Twitter: twitter.com/netfreedom <http://twitter.com/netfreedom>
>     Email: rguerra at privaterra.org <mailto:rguerra at privaterra.org>
>
>     On 2013-03-05, at 11:56 AM, Sandra ordonez wrote:
>
>     > Looking to connect for Spanish-speaking LibTech community
>     members for a community initiative. Please reach out to
>     sandraordonez [@] openitp [dot] org
>     > ---
>     > Estoy tratando de conectar con hispanohablantes para un una
>     iniciativa comunitaria. Por favor, ponerse en contacto con
>     sandraordonez [@] openitp [dot] org
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
>     -------------- next part --------------
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>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 20
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 17:03:39 -0500
>     From: Robert Guerra <rguerra at privaterra.org
>     <mailto:rguerra at privaterra.org>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes / Spanish-Speaking
>             LibTech Community
>     Message-ID: <0B180235-909D-4CF1-8AE4-F2A49629D119 at privaterra.org
>     <mailto:0B180235-909D-4CF1-8AE4-F2A49629D119 at privaterra.org>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>     Ya existe una lista con enfoque en LAC. Aqui los detalles -
>
>     RedLatAm mailing list
>     RedLatAm at lists.accessnow.org <mailto:RedLatAm at lists.accessnow.org>
>     https://lists.accessnow.org/listinfo/redlatam
>
>     Roberto
>
>     --
>     R. Guerra
>     Phone/Cell: +1 202-905-2081
>     Twitter: twitter.com/netfreedom <http://twitter.com/netfreedom>
>     Email: rguerra at privaterra.org <mailto:rguerra at privaterra.org>
>
>     On 2013-03-06, at 2:44 PM, Sandra wrote:
>
>     > Yah esta :)
>     >
>     > On 3/6/13 2:17 PM, Daniel H. Cabrera wrote:
>     >> interesado
>     >>
>     >> Daniel H. Cabrera Altieri
>     >> Profesor Titular de Teor?a de la Comunicaci?n
>     >> Coordinador del Grado en Periodismo
>     >>
>     >> Facultad de Filosof?a y Letras
>     >> Universidad de Zaragoza
>     >> Te. (34) 976761000 ext. 4043
>     >> c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12 - Zaragoza - 50009
>     >> Espa?a
>     >>
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> De: "a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>"
>     <a.nouvet at secdev.ca <mailto:a.nouvet at secdev.ca>>
>     >> Para: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     >> CC: sandraordonez at openitp.org <mailto:sandraordonez at openitp.org>
>     >> Enviado: Mi?rcoles 6 de marzo de 2013 17:40
>     >> Asunto: Re: [liberationtech] Hispanohablantes /
>     Spanish-Speaking LibTech Community
>     >>
>     >> I'd be interested to join.
>     >>
>     >> Saludos,
>     >> Antoine
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> > If there is enough interest, we could create a
>     Spanish-speaking list.
>     >> > I would like that, as a native Spanish speaker myself, with an
>     >> > interest in Liberationtech issues in Spain and Latin America.
>     >> >
>     >> > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira
>     <edulix at wadobo.com <mailto:edulix at wadobo.com>>
>     >> > wrote:
>     >> >> Hello there!
>     >> >>
>     >> >> I don't know how many others spanish-speaking people are
>     there, but
>     >> >> I'm a spaniard living in Madrid, we can get in touch =) I'm
>     the lead
>     >> >> developer of agoravoting.com <http://agoravoting.com>, an
>     e-democracy voting tool with support
>     >> >> for vote delegation.
>     >> >>
>     >> >> Regards,
>     >> >> --
>     >> >> Eduardo Robles Elvira    +34 668 824 393        skype: edulix2
>     >> >> http://www.wadobo.com    it's not magic, it's wadobo!
>     >> >> --
>     >> >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     >> >> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     >> >> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >> > --
>     >> > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     >> > emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     >> > https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >> >
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>
>     >>
>     >
>     >
>     > --
>     > Sandra Ordonez
>     > Community Outreach Manager
>     > Open Internet Tools Project
>     > @OpenITP
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
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>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 21
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 14:41:14 -0800
>     From: "Sky (Jim Schuyler)" <sky at cyberspark.net
>     <mailto:sky at cyberspark.net>>
>     To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID: <DA88B0D4-C8E9-4F3F-8890-6F8681FFC5F9 at cyberspark.net
>     <mailto:DA88B0D4-C8E9-4F3F-8890-6F8681FFC5F9 at cyberspark.net>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>     Thanks, Bernard for the info on APRS. I am out of date as I don't
>     use it.
>
>     You are especially right that here in the US it's easy to get a
>     Technician license, which is the entry-level amateur license
>     issued by the FCC. It takes maybe 3 hours of study and a 30-minute
>     test. I'd guess you have something similar in Ireland and most of
>     Europe.
>
>     Dr. Dey, could we know the country in which you're considering
>     using this approach? That would help us understand the licensing
>     structure there. And also the distances you are talking about. Are
>     the tribal areas 20 miles from reliable cellular service or are
>     they 200 miles out?
>
>     If you prefer to handle it off-list, it looks like there are a few
>     people who would be interested.
>
>     I am checking this HamSphere that is mentioned, and I don't see
>     that it's actually using radio anywhere. It appears to "simulate"
>     an amateur radio station but use the Internet for communication.
>     Not enough time to download and test this today.
>
>     So in terms of offering even a partial solution, perhaps figuring
>     out whether amateur radio could be provided in some inexpensive
>     way to these out-of-the-way areas would be of interest. Could
>     locals become licensed? Could radio equipment be available at an
>     affordable price? Could "itinerant" operators do the job on
>     motorcycles? Etc. If so, then more complex messages could
>     certainly be transmitted and there would be a wider window to the
>     world from the remote locations. The original question asked about
>     "voice" so the fact that I (or others) diverted this to digital
>     modes may be, in fact, just a diversion.
>
>     The Byzantium Project folks (wi-fi mesh) have some amateur
>     operators among their numbers and might also have opinions on how
>     easy it is to get folks licensed, and also on "edge" connections
>     of mesh and other networks to amateurs (which is severely limited
>     by law). My take is that even though hams tend to think it's easy
>     to get a license, there are significant (maybe psychological)
>     barriers to entry. Maybe it's just that mobile phones provide so
>     many of the same benefits without the licensure hassle?
>
>     Some of the people on this list know how wi-fi can be provisioned
>     over fairly long distances using high-gain antennas and mesh
>     software. It seems to me that this might be an interesting way to
>     go about getting real Internet connectivity. I've been on the list
>     a couple of years and heard only sporadic conversation about using
>     long-distance wi-fi as a liberating technology. An example of a
>     regional network that I've known since 2005 is airjaldi.com
>     <http://airjaldi.com> in northern India, but I know there are
>     others in Africa, South/East Asia and South America. They aren't
>     necessarily formed to liberate people from governmental
>     oppression, but they are providing much-needed connections for
>     their remote communities.
>
>     (Switching back to my proper email address for this reply)
>
>     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>     CyberSpark.net
>     -Keeping the flame of free speech
>           and human rights alive online
>
>     On Mar 6, 2013, at 1:51 PM, Bernard Tyers - ei8fdb
>     <ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org <mailto:ei8fdb at ei8fdb.org>> wrote:
>
>     > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>     > Hash: SHA1
>     >
>     > Howdy AA6AX,
>     >
>     > Nice to meet you.
>     >
>     > On 6 Mar 2013, at 21:09, Sky (Jim Schuyler) wrote:
>     >
>     >> Your APRS idea is interesting and I only know it from the
>     "positioning" side, not from passing any text, so you may want to
>     continue looking into it. I do not know that APRS is currently
>     passing any traffic other than positions, at least as used in the
>     US. I also do not know whether it's used outside the US. Please do
>     remember that APRS and most other amateur digital service are not
>     designed to be "reliable" which means they may not "try again" to
>     pass a message and the message may become garbled in transmission.
>     Some do attempt to error-correct, but not most.
>     >
>     > Not strictly true. APRS clients can be configured to send
>     messages and retry for X attempts. Then it will give up.
>     >
>     > Seeing as SMS transmission isn't even guaranteed, I think its a
>     pretty good attempt for a system that has been developed totally
>     for free! :)
>     >
>     >
>     >> Even most amateur radio digital protocols do not have very
>     robust error-correction, so they're a bit iffy.
>     >
>     > That is true.
>     >
>     >> Easiest to expand: maybe and maybe not. You have to have a
>     stable of radio operators available both locally and remotely.
>     (Presuming you want information to go from somewhere to somewhere.)
>     >
>     > If as Dr. Dey requested both sides of the communications were
>     between health workers and their HQ, you could train up all the
>     health workers and possibly even employ a "net controller"
>     (amateur radio lingo for person who sits in HQ and is in contact
>     with all the field posts) to co-ordinate communications.
>     >
>     >
>     >> Without licensing: Although I encourage folks to become amateur
>     radio operators, they do need to be licensed. The government that
>     giveth it can taketh it away at the stroke of a pen. I will skip
>     saying more right now.
>     >
>     > I agree. I'd go a bit further even and say a restricted licence
>     now-adays is trivial to receive.
>     >
>     >
>     >> Also I note in your original statement that you are talking
>     about "tribal areas" with poor connectivity. Your challenge is
>     going to be getting your signal from the tribal area to a reliable
>     amateur radio operator. That's unless the radio operator is
>     already in the tribal area. If the cell phone can's connect, then
>     amateur VHF and UHF probably wouldn't work either, so you'd have
>     to rely upon HF with longer range but much greater variability in
>     terms of signal propagation.
>     >
>     > How much can you build a self-sustaining 2M VHF repeater for
>     now-a-days? :)
>     >
>     >
>     >> Keep in mind that amateur radio is a point-to-point service
>     subject to the vagaries of radio propagation. In other words,
>     there is no reliable path 24/7 from one point to another unless
>     you're using prearranged VHF or UHF frequencies and line of sight
>     propagation. Commonly for emergency ops we arrange all of this in
>     advance and have emergency power and operators trained, and
>     frequencies and modes chosen. For HF propagation there is no
>     guarantee your message will get through because "the bands may be
>     dead."
>     >
>     > Which is kinda similar when it comes to mobile networks. If it
>     was possible to get a telco to carry out some "corporate social
>     responsability" work and install even just 2G voice that would be
>     something.
>     >
>     > I would argue, you can get a lot more communications bang for
>     buck with some trained amateur radio engineers, and some amateur
>     radio equipment, than spotty 3G coverage.
>     >
>     > Mobile operators work on the premise: when we will make enough
>     money from people, we will install equipment. I'd honestly hope
>     they have a different business model outside of Europe, but I
>     don't think so.
>     >
>     > 73's
>     >
>     > /Bernard
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >>
>     >> On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:08 PM, Ali-Reza Anghaie
>     <ali at packetknife.com <mailto:ali at packetknife.com>> wrote:
>     >>
>     >>> I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the
>     other problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
>     >>>
>     >>> Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand
>     and re-deploy without a telco or other licensing.
>     >>>
>     >>> I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS
>     (http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a laminated
>     deck of shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field
>     option? About as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst
>     case scenario - it might just work. -Ali
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler)
>     <sky at red7.com <mailto:sky at red7.com>> wrote:
>     >>> Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an
>     Android app wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an
>     amateur radio remotely, and there is software available to do
>     this. However, I'm not sure what benefit it would bring to this
>     project.
>     >>>
>     >>> In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information
>     in "clear text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not
>     want to try to exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt
>     it. In other countries it -should- be illegal to transmit medical
>     info in the clear, so I'd suggest avoiding this.
>     >>>
>     >>> Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient
>     bandwidth to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in
>     theory, but in general amateur radio operators restrict their
>     bandwidth and the maximum usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud.
>     i.e. very slow.
>     >>>
>     >>> -Sky  AA6AX
>     >>>
>     >>> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - - - -
>     >>> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     >>> -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     >>> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     >>> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
>     >>> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>     >>>
>     >>> On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com
>     <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>> wrote:
>     >>>
>     >>>> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the
>     specific
>     >>>> laws of the local country/countries involved.
>     >>>>
>     >>>> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     >>>> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>     >>>>
>     >>>> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to
>     coordinate
>     >>>> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to
>     discuss
>     >>>> any medical information that would allow a third party to
>     possibly
>     >>>> identify the patient.
>     >>>>
>     >>>> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM
>     licenses
>     >>>> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.
>      Also
>     >>>> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     >>>> frequencies can transmit further.
>     >>>>
>     >>>> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>     >>>>
>     >>>>
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     >>>> -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     >>>> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     >>>> https://itg.nu/
>     >>>> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     >>>> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint:
>     AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
>     >>>> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     >>>> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>     >>>>
>     >>>>
>     >>>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>> wrote:
>     >>>>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >>>>>
>     >>>>> Dear All,
>     >>>>>
>     >>>>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in
>     tribal areas with poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell
>     phone connectivity due to unstable signal strengths. i have learnt
>     that HAM radio software from HamSphere is downloadable on android
>     phones.I would like to know whether these android phones with HAM
>     radio software installed can be used for communication used for
>     voice communication between health workers themselves and with
>     head quarter staff. Will it be legally permissible and what
>     technical requirements will be needed to set up such system. The
>     other alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi hubs are currently not affordable to our limited
>     resource organisation
>     >>>>>
>     >>>>> Thanks,
>     >>>>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     >>>>> --
>     >>>>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>>> --
>     >>>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>>
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>
>     >> --
>     >> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >
>     > - --------------------------------------
>     > Bernard / bluboxthief / ei8fdb
>     >
>     > IO91XM / www.ei8fdb.org <http://www.ei8fdb.org>
>     >
>     > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
>     > Version: GnuPG/MacGPG2 v2.0.17 (Darwin)
>     > Comment: GPGTools - http://gpgtools.org
>     >
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>     > =phNo
>     > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
>     > --
>     > Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings at
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>
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>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 22
>     Date: Wed, 06 Mar 2013 15:25:30 -0800 (PST)
>     From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>
>     To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>>
>     Cc: Bowen Pan <bowenpan at gsb.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:bowenpan at gsb.stanford.edu>>,      Elizabeth Woodson
>             <ewoodson at stanford.edu <mailto:ewoodson at stanford.edu>>,  
>          Pukar Hamal <pchamal at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:pchamal at stanford.edu>>, Sam
>             Spiewak <spiewak at stanford.edu <mailto:spiewak at stanford.edu>>
>     Subject: [liberationtech] GoodJobs Challenge: Open Data, Jobs,  &
>             Social Sector
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CANhci9EFu1JSzQfrdBfSFwjZYX8Ysp=dRwJ+-amzcGv6gtuudw at mail.gmail.com <mailto:dRwJ%2B-amzcGv6gtuudw at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>     From: Pukar Hamal <pchamal at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:pchamal at stanford.edu>>, Sam Spiewak <spiewak at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:spiewak at stanford.edu>>,
>     Bowen Pan <bowenpan at gsb.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:bowenpan at gsb.stanford.edu>>, Elizabeth Woodson <
>     ewoodson at stanford.edu <mailto:ewoodson at stanford.edu>>
>
>     *GoodJobs*
>
>     A challenge focused on open data, jobs, and the social sector
>
>     GoodJobs invites Stanford students to create mobile and web tools
>     that will
>     help young people access social impact jobs.
>
>     *Who is behind it?*
>
>        - Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
>        - White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation
>        - White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
>        - Aspen Institute Impact Careers Initiative
>
>     *Who can participate?*
>     Any Stanford student who is passionate about social impact!
>     Whether you are
>     a graduate or undergrad, have coding and data skills or social sector
>     expertise, specialize in marketing or product design, or are just
>     interested in participating, you are welcome to register.
>
>     *How will it work?*
>     Teams of 4-6 students from diverse areas of expertise will form
>     prior to
>     the event and will have the opportunity to review the data sets
>     ahead of
>     time. On April 20th, all the teams will come together at Stanford?s
>     d.school to work intensely for a full day fleshing out their
>     ideas, getting
>     expert mentoring and input, designing a prototype, and planning
>     their pitch.
>
>     *Judges*
>
>        - Aditya Agarwal - VP of Engineering, Dropbox
>        - Lucy Bernholz ? Visiting Scholar, Stanford Center on
>     Philanthropy and
>        Civil Society
>        - Somesh Dash ? Principal, Institutional Venture Partners
>        - Jonathan Greenblatt ? Director, White House Office of Social
>     Innovation
>        - John Lilly ? Partner, Greylock Partners
>        - Dustin Moskovitz ? Co-founder, Facebook
>        - (more to be announced)
>
>
>     *Register*
>     http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/pacs-forms/goodjobs.fb
>      <http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/pacs-forms/goodjobs.fb>
>
>     IMPORTANT: enrollment is limited and we will be selecting the best
>     applicants. Apply today!
>
>     *FAQs & Questions*
>
>        - I have a team in mind, can we register together? Yes.
>        - Do I need to have a team already? No, individuals can
>     register and be
>        matched with a team.
>        - I'm not a coder but I know a lot about the social sector, can I
>        participate? Yes!
>
>
>     *Questions?*
>
>        - Sam Spiewak, Program Manger, the Stanford Center on
>     Philanthropy and
>        Civil Society:spiewak at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:Society%3Aspiewak at stanford.edu>
>        - Elizabeth Woodson, Director of Outreach, the Stanford Center on
>        Philanthropy and Civil Society: ewoodson at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:ewoodson at stanford.edu>
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>
>     ------------------------------
>
>     Message: 23
>     Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 20:06:17 -0500
>     From: Ali-Reza Anghaie <ali at packetknife.com
>     <mailto:ali at packetknife.com>>
>     To: "Dr.Tusharkanti Dey" <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>,
>     liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
>     <mailto:liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
>     Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Can HAM radio be used for communication
>             between health workers in rural areas with no cell
>     connectivity?
>     Message-ID:
>            
>     <CAPKVt5+wpMzGszAbMcixuH_Wod1pM=zrZYLaSz=QnQ3fMDo4ng at mail.gmail.com <mailto:QnQ3fMDo4ng at mail.gmail.com>>
>     Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>     Dr. Dey,
>
>     It appears you let the list off the response to me. Likewise it
>     appears you
>     have been dropped from the list discussion. You can see everyone's
>     responses at:
>
>     https://mailman.stanford.edu/pipermail/liberationtech/2013-March/thread.html(Scroll
>     <https://mailman.stanford.edu/pipermail/liberationtech/2013-March/thread.html%28Scroll>
>     toward bottom for thread)
>
>     The Android HAM option is software control of an external HAM
>     receiver or a
>     web-site that relays HAM radio groups. It is not an actual radio
>     solution
>     and will require the regular cellular data network to function - which
>     defeats the purpose of what you require.
>
>     Good luck, Cheers, -Ali
>
>
>
>     On Wed, Mar 6, 2013 at 7:39 PM, Dr.Tusharkanti Dey <
>     dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     wrote:
>
>     > Dear All,
>     >
>     > Thank you very much for your inputs.
>     >
>     > Transmission of voice communication in tribal inhabitated hilly
>     areas  is
>     > really difficult as the strength of the signals from mobile
>     transmission
>     > towers are almost nil. I thougt that, the solution in this
>     situation can be
>     >
>     > 1. Setting up of mobile signal strength boosters.
>     >
>     > 2. Setting up mid range wifi system .
>     >
>     > Both this options are not suitable for our organisation as our
>     resources
>     > are limited to bear the cost.
>     >
>     > Android phones are avilable in Indian Markets at a price of Rs.
>     3000/- to
>     > 4000/- ( approximately) ., where as HAM radio transrecivers are more
>     > costly. Also, HAM radio operators transmit valuable voice
>     communications in
>     > timre of emergencies. Why this can not be used for voice
>     communication in
>     > difficult areas while HAM radio transreceivers can be installed
>     on android
>     > phones. Will any body pl reply in details?
>     >
>     > If HAM radio can not applied what is the other low cost
>     solutions ? My
>     > intension is that voice communication will be trans mitted between
>     > headquarters to health workers and amongst health workers. I
>     would like to
>     > transmit vioce over an area of 10-20 sq. Km.
>     >
>     > Thanks,
>     >
>     > Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     > On Mar 7, 2013 1:38 AM, "Ali-Reza Anghaie" <ali at packetknife.com
>     <mailto:ali at packetknife.com>> wrote:
>     >
>     >> I'm assuming privacy issues are of minimal concern given the other
>     >> problems at play here - I could be wrong but bear with me.
>     >>
>     >> Trying to think of lowest-cost, reliable, easiest to expand and
>     re-deploy
>     >> without a telco or other licensing.
>     >>
>     >> I wonder is a low-bandwidth text HF APRS (
>     >> http://www.aprs.org/aprs-messaging.html) option with a
>     laminated deck of
>     >> shorthand medical terms would be a reasonable remote field
>     option? About
>     >> as rudimentary as you get but considering a worst case scenario
>     - it
>     >> might just work. -Ali
>     >>
>     >>
>     >>
>     >> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 9:15 PM, Sky (Jim Schuyler)
>     <sky at red7.com <mailto:sky at red7.com>> wrote:
>     >>
>     >>> Since "HAM" (amateur radio) is real radio, not phone, an
>     Android app
>     >>> wouldn't use it directly. The app might -control- an amateur radio
>     >>> remotely, and there is software available to do this. However,
>     I'm not sure
>     >>> what benefit it would bring to this project.
>     >>>
>     >>> In the US, amateur radio operators must send all information
>     in "clear
>     >>> text," and encryption is illegal, thus you would not want to
>     try to
>     >>> exchange medical info because you'd need to encrypt it. In
>     other countries
>     >>> it -should- be illegal to transmit medical info in the clear,
>     so I'd
>     >>> suggest avoiding this.
>     >>>
>     >>> Also, "high frequency" amateur radio doesn't have sufficient
>     bandwidth
>     >>> to transfer much digital information. VHF/UHF does in theory,
>     but in
>     >>> general amateur radio operators restrict their bandwidth and
>     the maximum
>     >>> usable transfer rate is under 9600 baud. i.e. very slow.
>     >>>
>     >>> -Sky  AA6AX
>     >>>
>     >>>      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>     - - - -
>     >>> - - - -
>     >>> Sky (Jim Schuyler, PhD)
>     >>> -We work backstage so you can be the star
>     >>> Blog: http://blog.red7.com/
>     >>> Phone: +1.415.759.7337
>     >>> PGP Keys: http://web.red7.com/pgp
>     >>>
>     >>> On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:47 PM, ITechGeek <itg at itechgeek.com
>     <mailto:itg at itechgeek.com>> wrote:
>     >>>
>     >>> Depends on what information you might be transmitting and the
>     specific
>     >>> laws of the local country/countries involved.
>     >>>
>     >>> HAMs have to be licensed through the local countries licensing
>     >>> authority (in the case of the US would be the FCC).
>     >>>
>     >>> Under US you could probably get away with allowing them to
>     coordinate
>     >>> if it is non-profit in nature, but you would not be able to
>     discuss
>     >>> any medical information that would allow a third party to possibly
>     >>> identify the patient.
>     >>>
>     >>> And some countries are very restrictive on who can get HAM
>     licenses
>     >>> due to the potential to get around their propaganda controls.
>      Also
>     >>> rules can change based on frequencies being used cause lower
>     >>> frequencies can transmit further.
>     >>>
>     >>> Can you provide the country or countries involved?
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     >>> -ITG (ITechGeek)
>     >>> ITG at ITechGeek.Com
>     >>> https://itg.nu/
>     >>> GPG Keys: https://itg.nu/contact/gpg-key
>     >>> Preferred GPG Key: Fingerprint:
>     AB46B7E363DA7E04ABFA57852AA9910A DCB1191A
>     >>> Google Voice: +1-703-493-0128 / Twitter: ITechGeek / Facebook:
>     >>> http://fb.me/Jbwa.Net
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>> On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 8:07 PM, Yosem Companys
>     <companys at stanford.edu <mailto:companys at stanford.edu>>
>     >>> wrote:
>     >>>
>     >>> From: Dr. Tusharkanti Dey <dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com
>     <mailto:dr.tusharkantidey at gmail.com>>
>     >>>
>     >>> Dear All,
>     >>>
>     >>> I am proposing to set up a ICT based health project in tribal
>     areas with
>     >>> poor infrastructural facilities with poor cell phone
>     connectivity due to
>     >>> unstable signal strengths. i have learnt that HAM radio
>     software from
>     >>> HamSphere is downloadable on android phones.I would like to
>     know whether
>     >>> these android phones with HAM radio software installed can be
>     used for
>     >>> communication used for voice communication between health workers
>     >>> themselves and with head quarter staff. Will it be legally
>     permissible and
>     >>> what technical requirements will be needed to set up such
>     system. The other
>     >>> alternative of setting up of mobile signal boosters or long
>     distance WiFi
>     >>> hubs are currently not affordable to our limited resource
>     organisation
>     >>>
>     >>> Thanks,
>     >>> Dr.Tusharkanti Dey
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     >>> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings
>     >>> at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>>
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     >>> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings
>     >>> at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>>
>     >>> --
>     >>> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>     password by
>     >>> emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu
>     <mailto:companys at stanford.edu> or changing your settings
>     >>> at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech
>     >>>
>     >>
>     >>
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>
>     End of liberationtech Digest, Vol 145, Issue 3
>     **********************************************
>
>
>
>
> --
> Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu or changing your settings at https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech

-- 
Prof. Dr. Volker Wulf
Institute for Information Systems, University of Siegen
Hölderlinstr. 3, 57068 Siegen, Germany
Phone: +49-271-740-2910, Email: volker.wulf at uni-siegen.de; and:
Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology (FhG-FIT)
Schloss Birlinghoven, 53754 Sankt Augustin, Germany
Phone: +49-2241-142993; Fax: +49-2241-142146
Email: volker.wulf at fit.fraunhofer.de

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