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[liberationtech] Google Unveils Tools to Access Web From Repressive Countries | TIME.com

Shava Nerad shava23 at gmail.com
Mon Oct 21 20:27:16 PDT 2013


So, I've had this post in draft since 10/15, and I added some links and a
couple paragraphs, and am just holding my breath, because the reason I
wasn't publishing it before is because, well, it's in the "Geeeeez, Shava"
category.

But with this news, it just seems too much in the "call me Cassandra"
territory not to push out, even though I'm sure people will say I'm only
speaking as a former Tor staffer.  I don't think so.  I took the position
at Tor because I'd been engaged in this field long before that (as I
mention in the post) and these issues are not new (she says, with horse
club in hand).

But my tin hat has been growing mercury wings and a small silk cape this
year, so hey...

And for any fellow travelers [#keyword logged oops wrong decade] going to
DC this weekend, I will be there, btw -- just lined up my carpool van of
12! -- seeking crash space for two.

http://www.shava.org/2013/10/22/a-retrospective-on-nymwars-google-as-the-identity-network-and-the-nsa/

yrs,


On Mon, Oct 21, 2013 at 10:12 PM, Eric S Johnson <crates at oneotaslopes.org>wrote:

> Without answering Jillian’s question directly, I have to say: “the more,
> the merrier.”****
>
> ** **
>
> Right now, in cybercensored countries, it’s true many folks (though far
> from all) have heard about one or more cybercircumvention tools. But most
> folks’ attempts to use them are not entirely successful, either because***
> *
>
> **·        **their proxies are blocked too, or****
>
> **·        **the proxy to which they can get access is overloaded.****
>
> At this point, the need for more proxies to solve these two problems is
> far from exhausted.****
>
> ** **
>
> I still haven’t heard of any cases where someone’s been persecuted *because
> they used a proxy*. I’m certainly not saying folks shouldn’t care about
> anonymity, just remembering that for the vast majority of cybercensored
> netizens, anonymity isn’t what they perceive to be the issue they face when
> they browse; censorship is.****
>
> ** **
>
> Best,****
>
> Eric****
>
> OpenPGP<http://keyserver.pgp.com/vkd/DownloadKey.event?keyid=0xE0F58E0F1AF7E6F2>:
> 0x1AF7E6F2 ● Skype: oneota ● XMPP/OTR: berekum at jabber.ccc.de ● Silent
> Circle: +1 312 614-0159****
>
> ** **
>
> *From:* liberationtech-bounces at lists.stanford.edu [mailto:
> liberationtech-bounces at lists.stanford.edu] *On Behalf Of *Jillian C. York
> *Sent:* Tuesday, October 22, 2013 08.01
> *To:* liberationtech
> *Subject:* Re: [liberationtech] Google Unveils Tools to Access Web From
> Repressive Countries | TIME.com****
>
> ** **
>
> Since I already have more skepticism of Google Ideas and Jared Cohen than
> I need, let me pose this question:****
>
> ** **
>
> With the understanding that uProxy provides no anonymity protections, *is
> it providing anything that other circumvention tools do not already?*
> What's unique about it?****
>
> ** **
>
> ** **
>
> --
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
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>



-- 

Shava Nerad
shava23 at gmail.com
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