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[liberationtech] Snowden masks for Holloween?

ale fernandez skoria at gmail.com
Tue Sep 3 05:47:42 PDT 2013


Snowden, IIRC was trying to say he wasn't particularly heroic and was doing what anyone would have done with a shred of sense/ethics in his situation. If you are someone like that, maybe stick your head in a photocopier/scanner, or photograph yourself looking snowden-like, and print out a mask of your own face. Easy and open source, and you can make a web two-oh site with the idea too!

Ale

On Tue, 3 Sep 2013 21:45:16 +1000
Tom O <winterfilth at gmail.com> wrote:

> Yeah IANAL either but for some odd reason I thought a likeness/name could
> be trademarked much like a corporate logo. I'm no good at trademark law
> though. Too much mumbo jumbo.
> 
> Hah, president? Not me. I don't have the citizenship, friends, money, lack
> of morality, promise breaking capacity to be a leader of a nation ;)
> 
> On Tuesday, September 3, 2013, Shava Nerad wrote:
> 
> > http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personality_rights
> >
> > IANAL, but I used to work in entertainment licensing and was a member at
> > licensing.org/LIMA.  Probably qualified as a paralegal in this area.
> > Trademark has nearly nothing to do with it, although you can involve a
> > likeness in a trademark -- at which point it is no longer personal (e.g.
> > Col. Sanders' estate has no recourse to complain that the current KFC logo
> > isn't a suitable likeness because of the reasonable expectations of
> > commercial art of that genre,  if precedent holds).
> >
> > And, uh, right,  because we don't really care about the law or Snowden's
> > rights, just what we can get away with internationally and in the court of
> > public opinion.  Thinking of running for president? ;)
> >
> > SN
> >  On Sep 3, 2013 1:52 AM, "Tom O" <winterfilth at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Unless he's trademarked his likeness, it's doubtful he'd have any
> > recourse.
> >
> > And if he did, what chance does he have to defend it in Russia?
> >
> > Slim to none
> >
> > On Tuesday, September 3, 2013, Travis McCrea wrote:
> >
> > I actually disagree... his ownership of his likeness is minimal. He is a
> > public figure and as such anyone who wanted to make a mask would be pretty
> > free to do so. I am not saying someone should go out and do it, and if you
> > do and get sued don't come after me... but if I had the resources available
> > and I thought this could make some money I would do it.
> >
> > Travis McCrea
> > http://www.travismccrea.com
> > USA: 1(206) 552-8728 / CAN: 1(778) 709-4859
> >
> > Candidate for the Canadian Pirate Party in the Vancouver Centre riding.
> > Any views stated in this email are my own and do not reflect the opinions
> > of the party.
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Sep 3, 2013 at 12:01 AM, Shava Nerad <shava23 at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > No one elected him and he may have volunteered for the spotlight but not
> > in the same way that some one does when they campaign for office.  Even
> > movie stars have a right to their visages.  Where you could say that a sign
> > "We are all Snowden" is political speech,  citizen Snowden also has rights
> > to privacy and dignity,  and commercial rights that he does not abandon by
> > being a well-knnown whistleblower, any more than say Rush Limbaugh would by
> > being a well-known radio personality.  Just see how fast the lawyers would



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