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[liberationtech] Brazil Looks to Break from U.S.-Centric Internet

Andrés Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes alps6085 at gmail.com
Sat Sep 21 03:28:00 PDT 2013


Thanks, Bill for that posting. It tells a very different story than
the "US propagandish" article that started this thread.

I do take issue with statements attributing almost wholly to "the
private sector" the international growth of the Internet, when in fact
it wouldn't have been possible without the active participation of
governments, including huge public asset  transfers to "the private
sector" through "privatizations,"  and government "licensing" and
"regulations" that disproportionately benefit "the private sector"
against "the general public."  Brazil and the US are no exception, but
rather the rule, each one in its own way.

BTW, in this case "the private sector" is "too many people." In
reality, the Telco world is one of the most "concentrated," so we're
not talking about "free enterprise" here by any stretch of the
imagination. In fact, it's what the Mexican "Street Philosopher"
Manuel de Landa calls "anti-markets:"
http://www.alamut.com/subj/economics/de_landa/antiMarkets.html

Best Regards | Cordiales Saludos | Grato,

Andrés L. Pacheco Sanfuentes
<alps at acm.org>
+1 (817) 271-9619


On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 2:14 PM, Bill Woodcock <woody at pch.net> wrote:
>
> On Sep 18, 2013, at 9:40 AM, Bill Woodcock <woody at pch.net> wrote:
>> Well, there are a bunch of different concepts being discussed.  The primary one is localization of routing, which isn't just possible, it's best-practice, and something Brazil has been doing an excellent job of already for quite a few years…
>
> David asked me to write this up in a bit more detail, with links to references, et cetera:
>
> http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2013/9/20/brazil-internet-dilmarousseffnsa.html
>
> "Despite the clear benefits of these developments for Brazilians, their government's statements have been shrilly and incorrectly branded as extreme and decried as Soviet socialism by some US media. This is largely due to a misimpression that what Brazil is doing is cutting itself off from the Internet or balkanizing the Internet -- when in reality, it's building more Internet faster."  et cetera.
>
>                                 -Bill
>
>
>
>
>
> --
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