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[liberationtech] Announcement on new issue: EQPAM Volume 4 Issue No.2 April 2015

Camelia Voinea camelia_voinea at yahoo.com
Mon Apr 27 22:23:14 PDT 2015


Dear LiberationTech Team,
This is the announcement on the new EQPAM issue and the table of contents to be published on the LiberationTech list.
 Kind regards,Camelia F. Voinea
Announcement:=============================================The Editorial Team of the European Quarterly of Political Attitudes and Mentalities is happy to announce EQPAM Vol. 4, Issue No. 2, April 2015 !  Table of Contents: Zoran Pavlović : "Individual and Country Level Determinants of (Post)Materialist Values in Eastern Europe"  (pp. 1-11)      Marcus van der Erve:  "Improving Democracy: A Pipe Dream? Benefiting from parallels with the corporate world and ... nature" (pp. 12-24)      Snežana Stojšin: "Ethnic Diversity of Population in Vojvodina at the Beginning of the 21st Century" (pp. 25-37)     Gražina Rapolienė and Aurelija Jakubė: "Projects in Academic Institutions: Between Bureaucracy and Post Bureaucracy" (pp. 38-55)    Jasper Muis: "Populists as Chameleons? An Adaptive Learning Approach to the Rise of Populist Politicians" (pp. 56-74) Book Review: Andrew C. Gould and Anthony M. Messina, (Eds.), "Europe's Contending Identities: Supranationalism, Ethnoregionalism, Religion, and New Nationalism", Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, (2014)  - Book Review by Saeko Hashimoto  (pp. 75-77) Book Promotion: Spyridon N. Litsas and Aristotle Tziampiris (Eds.) "The Eastern Mediterranean in Transition. Multipolarity, Politics and Power", Ashgate (April 2015)  (p. 78)
Paper submissions should be address on the EQPAM Contact Address: eqpam at fspub.unibuc.roEQPAM website can be visited at: European Quarterly of Political Attitudes and Mentalities =============================================
Camelia Florela Voinea, PhD
Associate Professor
Political Sciences, International Relations and Security Studies Department
Political Science Faculty
University of Bucharest, Romania
Office Address: #8, Spiru Haret Street, Bucharest 010175
E-mail(s): camelia.voinea at fspub.unibuc.ro , camelia_voinea at yahoo.com
Home Page: https://sites.google.com/a/fspub.unibuc.ro/conf-univ-dr-camelia-florela-voinea/
You can access my papers on SSRN at: http://ssrn.com/author=2103805
      From: "liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu" <liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu>
 To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu 
 Sent: Monday, April 27, 2015 11:06 PM
 Subject: liberationtech Digest, Vol 240, Issue 1
   
----- Forwarded Message -----

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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of liberationtech digest..."

Today's Topics:

  1. CFP: ICML 2015 Workshop on Fairness, Accountability,    and
      Transparency in Machine Learning (Solon Barocas)
  2. LACUNY Institute: Privacy and Surveillance: Library Advocacy
      for the 21st Century, May 8, NYC (ROBERT.FARRELL)
  3. Re: Americans? Views on Open Government Data #opengov
      #opendata - Only 5% say very effective! (Owen Ambur)
  4. Curious about tech in Cuba? (Yosem Companys)
  5. Re: Curious about tech in Cuba? (Christian Huldt)
  6. 2nd International Conference on Communication and    Management
      (ICCM2016)_1st Call (Margarita Kefalaki)
  7. Curious about tech in Cuba? (Corrected Link) (Yosem Companys)
  8. Trottier/Fuchs (eds) Social media,    politics and the state
      (Christian Fuchs)
  9. Re: Tails ISO verification extension for Firefox (intrigeri)
  10. IGF-USA 2015 Community Survey (Robert Guerra)
  11. Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (carlo von lynX)
  12. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  13. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  14. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  15. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  16. Re: Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home (hellekin)
  17. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  18. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  19. Re: Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Timur Mehrvarz)
  20. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  21. Re: Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Timur Mehrvarz)
  22. Re: Tails ISO verification extension for Firefox (sajolida)
  23. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  24. Re: Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Aymeric Vitte)
  25. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  26. Re: Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Aymeric Vitte)
  27. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  28. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Yosem Companys)
  29. Re: Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Aymeric Vitte)
  30. Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country in    Nepal
      (Yosem Companys)
  31. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Joseph Lorenzo Hall)
  32. Re: Secure Video Recording for Android (John Sullivan)
  33. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Lina Srivastava)
  34. Re: Ghostery, NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Rich Kulawiec)
  35. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Peter Micek)
  36. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Lina Srivastava)
  37. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Nick Ashton-Hart)
  38. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Gary Garriott  (ggarriott at INTERNEWS.ORG))
  39. Re: Ghostery,    NoScript.. add-ons frequently phone home
      (Al Billings)
  40. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Nick Ashton-Hart)
  41. Re: Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country    in Nepal
      (Bill Woodcock)
  42. Map4Nepal at Stanford Information & Introductory Workshop
      Announcement. Please Forward! (Yosem Companys)
CALL FOR PAPERS
===============================================================

2nd Workshop on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency in Machine Learning

ICML 2015

July 11, Lille, France

http://fatml.org/

Submission Deadline: May 1, 2015

===============================================================

OVERVIEW
----------------

Machine learning is increasingly part of our everyday lives, influencing not only our individual interactions with online websites and platforms, but even national policy decisions that shape society at large. When algorithms make automated decisions that can affect our lives so profoundly, how do we make sure that their decisions are fair, verifiable, and accountable? This workshop will explore how to integrate these concerns into machine learning and how to address them with computationally rigorous methods.

The workshop takes place at an important moment. The debate about ‘big data' on both sides of the Atlantic has begun to expand beyond issues of privacy and data protection. Policymakers, regulators, and advocates have recently expressed fears about the potentially discriminatory impact of analytics, with many calling for further technical research into the dangers of inadvertently encoding bias into automated decisions.  At the same time, there is growing alarm that the complexity of machine learning may reduce the justification for consequential decisions to “the algorithm made me do it”.  Decision procedures perceived as fundamentally inscrutable have drawn special attention.

The workshop will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers to address these challenges head-on.

TOPICS OF INTEREST
-------------------------------

We welcome contributions on theoretical models, empirical work, and everything in between, including (but not limited to) contributions that address the following open questions:

* How can we achieve high classification accuracy while preventing discriminatory biases?

* What are meaningful formal fairness properties?

* What is the best way to represent how a classifier or model has generated a particular result?

* Can we certify that some output has an explanatory representation?

* How do we balance the need for knowledge of sensitive attributes for  fair modeling and classification with concerns and limitations around the collection and use of sensitive attributes?

* What ethical obligations does the machine learning community have when models affect the lives of real people?

PAPER SUBMISSION
-----------------------------

Papers are limited to four content pages, including figures and tables, and must follow the ICML 2015 format; however, an additional fifth page containing only cited references is permitted. Papers SHOULD be anonymized. Accepted papers will be made available on the workshop website; however, the workshop's proceedings can be considered non-archival, meaning contributors are free to publish their work in archival journals or conferences. Accepted papers will be either presented as a talk or poster (to be determined by the workshop organizers). 

Papers should be submitted here: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=fatml2015

Deadline for submissions: May 1, 2015
Notification of acceptance: May 10, 2015

ORGANIZATION
----------------------

Workshop Organizers:

Solon Barocas, Princeton University
Sorelle Friedler, Haverford College
Moritz Hardt, IBM Almaden Research Center
Joshua Kroll, Princeton University
Carlos Scheidegger, University of Arizona
Suresh Venkatasubramanian, University of Utah
Hanna Wallach, Microsoft Research NYC
 The Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY) Invites You to:
The 2015 LACUNY Institute:Privacy and Surveillance: Library Advocacy for the 21st CenturyFriday, May 8 from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PMJohn Jay College of Criminal JusticeRegistration: $30 Students, $60 Non-student (includes continental breakfast and lunch)Register at: http://bit.ly/LACUNYInstEvent Program: https://2015lacunyinst.commons.gc.cuny.edu/program/
The LACUNY Institute is an annual, one-day conference open to LIS professionals, students, and the general public. It is organized by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY), and although geared to academic librarians, it strives to have broad relevance to the profession.
This year's Institute features:
   
   - Practical and theoretical perspectives on privacy and surveillance, covering topics such as e-books, Tor and web browsing, library privacy policies, privacy in the academic classroom, privacy instruction to students, and more!
   - Keynote by Rainey Reitman, Activism Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation and COO and Co-Founder of the Freedom of the Press Foundation
   - Closing talk by Alison Macrina of the Library Freedom Project

We hope to see you there!The observation "Relatively few Americans reported using government data sources for monitoring what is going on" is utterly unsurprising ... for the simple fact that is far too difficult to do.  

In the case of the Federal government, hardly anyone knows about the Perfomance.gov site (nor should they need to know about it) and, if they do, they know it is more about making the Administration "look" good than about reporting actual performance ... good, bad, and indifferent.

Even fewer know that agencies are  failing to comply with sections 2 & 10 of the GPRA Modernization Act (GPRAMA), which requires them to publish their strategic and performance plans and reports on their websites in machine-readable format -- preferably an open, standard, machine-readable format like StratML. http://xml.fido.gov/stratml/references/PL111-532StratML.htm#SEC2 & http://xml.fido.gov/stratml/references/PL111-532StratML.htm#SEC10 

Even if and, hopefully, when agencies do begin complying with the law and value-added intermediaries begin to leverage that open, machine-readable data to make it easy for citizens to discover and keep track of what is and is not "going on," relatively few are likely to do so.

However, leveraging the power of "social" media matured for business-quality usage via a standard like StratML, the power of the few will be greatly magnified ... and the results will begin to speak far more clearly for themselves ... to anyone who gives a hoot about what their government is trying to accomplish.

Ultimately, citizens should be free to use whatever tools, apps, and services *they* choose to discover and track progress on any public objective of interest to them, regardless of the level or agency of government involved.  If and, hopefully, when that occurs, they will have no one to blame but themselves if they fail to do so.  In the meantime, there is plenty of blame to go around.

Owen Ambur
Chair, AIIM StratML Committee
Co-Chair Emeritus, xml.gov CoP
Webmaster, FIRM
Profile on LinkedIn | Personal Home Page



-----Original Message-----
From: Steven Clift [mailto:clift at e-democracy.org] 
Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2015 10:55 AM
To: newswire
Cc: brigade; muni-innovation at googlegroups.com; open-government at lists.okfn.org; OGP Civil Society group; liberationtech; eGovIG IG
Subject: Pew: Americans’ Views on Open Government Data #opengov #opendata - Only 5% say very effective!

Important survey just released:

      http://bit.ly/pewopengov

Discuss here:
      https://www.facebook.com/groups/opengovgroup/permalink/1625987174299539/



Pew Research Center: Americans’ Views on Open Government Data

The survey ... "captures public views at the emergent moment when new technology tools and techniques are being used to disseminate and capitalize on government data and specifically looks at:

* People’s level of awareness of government efforts to share data

* Whether these efforts translate into people using data to track government performance

* If people think government data initiatives have made, or have the potential to make, government perform better or improve accountability

* The more routine kinds of government-citizen online interactions, such as renewing licenses or searching for the hours of public facilities."

...

The top line numbers:

"Few Americans think governments are very effective in sharing data they collect with the public:

* Just 5% say the federal government does this very effectively, with another 39% saying the federal government does this somewhat effectively.

* 5% say state governments share data very effectively, with another 44% saying somewhat effectively.

* 7% say local governments share data very effectively, with another 45% responding somewhat effectively.

Somewhat larger numbers could think of examples in which their local government either did or did not do a good job providing information to the public:

* 19% of all Americans could think of an example where the local government did a good job providing information to the public about data it collects.

* 19% could think of an example where local government did not provide enough useful information about data and information to the public.

Relatively few Americans reported using government data sources for monitoring what is going on:

* 20% have used government sources to find information about student or teacher performance.

* 17% have used government sources to look for information on the performance of hospitals or health care providers.

* 7% have used government sources to find out about contracts between government agencies and outside firms."

...

I have lots to say about this ... another time:
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/opengovgroup/permalink/1625987174299539/

The missing question if we want to build public trust in government in my view is whether the public would like government to provide secure individual online access to private and public government data held about you. Estonia does this, so can the rest of the world.


Steven Clift  -  Executive Director, E-Democracy.org
  clift at e-democracy.org  -  +1.612.234.7072
  @democracy  -  http://linkedin.com/in/netclift

E-Democracy can help: http://e-democracy.org/services


From: Stephanie Maria Nevel <snevel at stanford.edu>

Cuba + Silicon Valley Connect

Curious about Cuba?

Meet Eliecer Avila - engineering student at Universidad de la Habana
and founder of SOMOS+, a network of Cubans working to build a modern,
prosperous, and free country.

Friday 4.24.15 at 1 pm in Kehillah Hall at Stanford University.
Traditional Cuban food will be served.

RSVP here: http://is.gd/NgT43j


Any chance to stream or record this?

(I won't get a visa in time...)

Yosem Companys skrev den 2015-04-23 20:18:
> From: Stephanie Maria Nevel <snevel at stanford.edu>
> 
> Cuba + Silicon Valley Connect
> 
> Curious about Cuba?
> 
> Meet Eliecer Avila - engineering student at Universidad de la Habana
> and founder of SOMOS+, a network of Cubans working to build a modern,
> prosperous, and free country.
> 
> Friday 4.24.15 at 1 pm in Kehillah Hall at Stanford University.
> Traditional Cuban food will be served.
> 
> RSVP here: http://is.gd/NgT43j
> 



Dear friends and colleagues,
We would like to invite you to submit your abstracts at the 
2nd International Conference on Communication and Management (ICCM2016), 9
-12 May 2016, Athens, Greece (http://coming.gr/index.php/call-for-papers/ )
The Communication Institute of Greece (COM.IN.G.) organises its 2nd Annual
International Conference on Communication and Management (ICCM2016), 9 -12
May 2016, in Athens, Greece. The aim of this cross-disciplinary conference
is to bring together academics, students, researchers and professionals from
different disciplines and cultural backgrounds, encourage them to present
their work, exchange and collaborate. Academics and professionals can
participate by presenting a paper, chairing a session, organising a panel,
or even by being an observer.
For more information please visit
http://coming.gr/index.php/call-for-papers/ 

Best regards,
Dr Margarita Kefalaki, President 
Communication Institute of Greece
URL: http://coming.gr/ 
Address: Artemidos 12, Moschato, 18345
E-mail: mke at coming.gr , Tel.: +30 6989478611
FB: https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/252564804911830/
LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/pub/dr-margarita-kefalaki/30/4b0/9a4





From: Stephanie Nevel <stephanienevel at gmail.com>

I noticed that the RSVP link was not working - can you please resend
the email to the Liberation Tech lists with the link below?

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1haE-8HQ00sGkzEKkOPPbtyQ3fzkfBipjsT2FpTQCPxw/viewform

Thank you,

Stephanie Nevel

On Thu, Apr 23, 2015 at 11:18 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
>
> From: Stephanie Maria Nevel <snevel at stanford.edu>
>
> Cuba + Silicon Valley Connect
>
> Curious about Cuba?
>
> Meet Eliecer Avila - engineering student at Universidad de la Habana
> and founder of SOMOS+, a network of Cubans working to build a modern,
> prosperous, and free country.
>
> Friday 4.24.15 at 1 pm in Kehillah Hall at Stanford University.
> Traditional Cuban food will be served.
>
> RSVP here: http://is.gd/NgT43j
>


Trottier, Daniel and Christian Fuchs, eds. 2015. Social media, politics 
and the state. Protests, revolutions, riots, crime and policing in the 
age of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. New York: Routledge.

This book is the essential guide for understanding how state power and 
politics are contested and exercised on social media. It brings together 
contributions by social media scholars who explore the connection of 
social media with revolutions, uprising, protests, power and 
counter-power, hacktivism, the state, policing and surveillance. It 
shows how collective action and state power are related and conflict as 
two dialectical sides of social media power, and how power and 
counter-power are distributed in this dialectic. Theoretically focused 
and empirically rigorous research considers the two-sided contradictory 
nature of power in relation to social media and politics.

More information:
http://fuchs.uti.at/books/social-media-politics-and-the-state/
Introduction:
http://fuchs.uti.at/wp-content/introduction.pdf

Section One: Introductions

1. Theorising Social Media, Politics and the State: An Introduction
Daniel Trottier and Christian Fuchs

2. Social Networking Sites in Pro-democracy and Anti-austerity Protests: 
Some Thoughts from a Social Movement Perspective
Donatella della Porta and Alice Mattoni

Section Two: Global and Civil Counter-Power

3. Populism 2.0: Social Media Activism, the Generic Internet User and 
Plebiscitary Digital Democracy
Paolo Gerbaudo

4. Anonymous: Hacktivism and Contemporary Politics
Christian Fuchs

Section Three: Civil Counter-Power Against Austerity

5. Web 2.0 Nazi Propaganda: Golden Dawn’s Affect, Spectacle and Identity 
Constructions in Social Media
Panos Kompatsiaris and Yiannis Mylonas

6. More Than an Electronic Soapbox: Activist Web Presence as a 
Collective Action Frame, Newspaper Source and Police Surveillance Tool 
During the London G20 Protests in 2009
Jonathan Cable

7. Assemblages: Live Streaming Dissent in the ‘Quebec Spring’
Elise Danielle Thorburn

Section Four: Contested and Toppled State Power

8. Creating Spaces for Dissent: The Role of Social Media in the 2011 
Egyptian Revolution
Sara Salem

9. Social Media Activism and State Censorship
Thomas Poell

Section Five: State Power as Policing and Intelligence

10. Vigilantism and Power Users: Police and User-Led Investigations on 
Social Media
Daniel Trottier

11. Police ‘Image Work’ in an Era of Social Media: YouTube and the 2007 
Montebello Summit Protest
Christopher J. Schneider





Hi Giovanni,

Giovanni Pellerano wrote (19 Apr 2015 19:58:36 GMT) :
> while developing GlobaLeaks (https://github.com/globaleaks/GlobaLeaks)
> and developing our end-to-end encryption ideas where we would need
> verify Javascript signing and collaborating with SecureDrop people in
> relation to shared topics we ended in discussing exactly the same need
> you are explaining but a little more generic in relation to projects
> signing/integrity; [...]

The Code Signing Everywhere project seems strongly targeted at
verifying webapp code. So, I don't really understand how it's more
generic than the idea sajolida mentioned: one project is specific to
verifying webapps code, while the other one is specific to downloading
files to the filesystem and verifying them. I'll be happy to stand
corrected if I missed something :)

Now, perhaps both ideas could somehow converge. I suspect the UX and
interface side of things would be the hardest part, given the very
different use cases, despite the fact that some lower-level bits and
processes, that happen under the hood, could be shared (this remains
to be checked: e.g. it might be that the hooks provided by Firefox
add-on/plugins API for one use case and the other are vastly
different -- I've no idea).

> You find here the root document of the tentative specification [...]

Thanks for the pointers! 

Cheers,
--
intrigeri




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Just so you know, frequently the add-ons you recommend have
phone-home functionality just as Firefox itself.

Firefox by default connects Google to let it know your current 
IP of the day. Officially it is picking up precious info from
some safebrowsing*.google.com site.. you can disable it if you
dare to uncheck the "Block reported [evil cybercrimes]" boxes.
I was told it even lets Google have the cookie it uses to
identify you, so even if you use Tor, the five eyes immediately
know it is you. I didn't bother to check however.

Next thing it does is to connect a whole slew of
*addons.mozilla.org sites to make sure it won't miss out
on letting Mozilla know which version you are running etc.

Then it's the moment for the addons. NoScript immediately
sends a shout out to informaction.com while Ghostery...
Oh no! Ghostery! Weren't they supposed to be the good folks?
Yes, Ghostery has code in its init() function that looks
like this:

        if (JUST_UPGRADED) {
                metrics.recordUpgrade();
        } else if (JUST_INSTALLED) {
                SDK.timers.setTimeout(function () {
                        metrics.recordInstall();
                }, 300000);
        } else {
                metrics.recordInstall();
        }

You don't need to learn coding to understand that here is
a series of if/else-if/else which, whatever condition your
addon may be in, will result in some metrics.something()
getting executed. That function then happens to produce an
HTTP request targeted at "d.ghostery.com" which tells
Ghostery which IP address you are using today and whether
you are a nice person (Ghostrank=1) or not so nice (aka
Ghostrank=0). This allows Ghostery to measure how many
people are using their tool.. which sounds reasonable from
a business model point of view. Unfortunately, the problem
with business models is, there hardly seem to be any that
go together well with privacy. So once again a privacy tool
is protecting you really well from the truly nasty people,
but cutting out a little privileged exception for itself.

Is this a serious problem? Depends. I haven't checked whether
it sends identifying cookies along. Probably the information is 
rather anonymous - you may consider this no reason to worry.

I was a bit surprised to find that Ghostery calls home even
if I unchecked all the appropriate preferences, but it does.
You can opt out by blocking the hostname in your firewall.
At least until they change it to "e." or "f."

What do you folks think about this.. should we worry about
software calling home to report things about us? Do we really
have to inspect each specific case or should we be angry anyhow?
Where is the boundary of well-educated privacy software?

How much more capitalism can the web take? I see a systemic
problem of capitalism not getting along well with
constitutional duties.


-- 
  E-mail is public! Talk to me in private using Tor.
  torify telnet loupsycedyglgamf.onion        DON'T SEND ME
          irc://loupsycedyglgamf.onion:67/lynX  PRIVATE EMAIL
        http://loupsycedyglgamf.onion/LynX/   OR FACEBOOGLE


Simple solution: don't install third party addons or code and block google.com and all related sites in your local hosts file.
Simple solution: don't install third party addons or code and block google.com and all related sites in your local hosts file.
What is the Richard Stallman and FSF approved browser?


What is the Richard Stallman and FSF approved browser?


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA512

On 04/25/2015 08:13 PM, Al Billings wrote:
> What is the Richard Stallman and FSF approved browser?
>
*** For FSF, that would be rebranded firefox (iceape), and qupzilla.
For rms, I guess wget, or Emacs-w3m :)

==
hk
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HBzhcszB7vNLU3pEmK7PPNlpb2Sugey2U2aPgxwGJ2Ix8EdAAq7bDPb4mfrcD4Xh
YUoz3ga7F015TrDvT6lmUuoeh0tKbwkirW2v/tpzRAwLuoZKa8kzG4jjQByJSZkf
tc7+yM4Wm4/0nhgo42pisjzlEzqjW8DKJWco0ayK+LmQpDZGZ/TriYLW2yXeKKc6
zdwFwg+Y+nQ402GXnNAdnYLNFv5cg1dHi1QElnzZbL0LrlYfmquMmmRGQd9+cBZM
qihoRfsO2gobZuiRYzbcru64J9Qm2fKGk32QRZsEhd2bVEt707sBzl8mUKdGNG+Z
9K18o9lfEYmHX9y4LAYv
=gB5K
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


No curl? :-)



> On Apr 25, 2015, at 4:34 PM, hellekin <hellekin at gnu.org> wrote:
> 
> For rms, I guess wget, or Emacs-w3m :)


Seriously though, someone should write a Firefox (and Chrome, I guess) extension that flips all the privacy bits folks want, adds some more controls, blocks pings, and have a panel to control all of this via a UI. That would be a lot more useful than complaining about the state of affairs. 
This exists already: https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock

On my PC uBlock has replaced AdBlock Edge, Element Hiding helper,
NoScript, Ghostery and RequestPolicy. It's incredibly good. Even
Stallman could use Firefox now.

(Hi Richard, you would still need to add RefreshBlocker,
HTTPS-Everywhere and CockieMonster.)

On 26.04.2015 02:30, Al Billings wrote:
> Seriously though, someone should write a Firefox (and Chrome, I guess) extension that flips all the privacy bits folks want, adds some more controls, blocks pings, and have a panel to control all of this via a UI. That would be a lot more useful than complaining about the state of affairs. 
> 



No, it doesn’t. I run that and it doesn’t do the things I listed.

> On Apr 25, 2015, at 5:43 PM, Timur Mehrvarz <timur.mehrvarz at riseup.net> wrote:
> 
> This exists already: https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock


"Sir, yes, I want to return this boomerang. It doesn't work."

uBlock can do all of the things. It may take some getting used to. But
it is a wonderful instrument. Did you enable "I am an advanced user"?

On 26.04.2015 02:53, Al Billings wrote:
> No, it doesn't. I run that and it doesn't do the things I listed.
> 
>> On Apr 25, 2015, at 5:43 PM, Timur Mehrvarz <timur.mehrvarz at riseup.net> wrote:
>>
>> This exists already: https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock
> 


Peter Bourgelais:
> Before I left Access, I started this project
> (https://github.com/AccessNow/FlyRodCrosby), which would download the
> Tails ISO, check its PGP signature using python-gnupg, and burn it to a
> DVD.  It was just at the point where you could generate executables for
> Windows, OSX, and Linux, and there were localizations in the works as
> well.

Thanks for the pointer, I didn't know about it. It seems to have similar
goals as Satori (https://github.com/satori) and so quite different from
our for the same reasons.

> The two major changes that needed to happen were some extra
> educational materials for the user to look at while they're downloading,

That's also an idea we had! I'm glad you thought about that as well.

-- 
sajolida


Go read the original poster's complaint. It doesn't block update pings, safe browsing pings, etc.



> On Apr 26, 2015, at 8:05 AM, Timur Mehrvarz <timur.mehrvarz at riseup.net> wrote:
> 
> "Sir, yes, I want to return this boomerang. It doesn't work."
> 
> uBlock can do all of the things. It may take some getting used to. But
> it is a wonderful instrument. Did you enable "I am an advanced user"?
> 
>> On 26.04.2015 02:53, Al Billings wrote:
>> No, it doesn't. I run that and it doesn't do the things I listed.
>> 
>>> On Apr 25, 2015, at 5:43 PM, Timur Mehrvarz <timur.mehrvarz at riseup.net> wrote:
>>> 
>>> This exists already: https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock
> -- 
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.



Le 26/04/2015 01:02, Al Billings a écrit :
> block google.com and all related sites in your local hosts file
Are you serious? "block google.com"

Should we block mozilla.org too?

Could you be more precise and give the complete list of 
safebrowsing_stuff.google.com and "related sites" that FF is using 
(including Mozilla's)?

I already posted this, here is an example of what the browsers are 
sending outside http://www.peersm.com/img/out.jpg, using https of course 
for most of the links so you can not know what the messages are talking 
about

-- 
Check the 10 M passwords list: http://peersm.com/findmyass
Anti-spies and private torrents, dynamic blocklist: http://torrent-live.org
Peersm : http://www.peersm.com
torrent-live: https://github.com/Ayms/torrent-live
node-Tor : https://www.github.com/Ayms/node-Tor
GitHub : https://www.github.com/Ayms



If you're the kind of person paranoid about safebrowing pings and similar, yeah, you should pull the tinfoil hat tighter and block all things.



> On Apr 26, 2015, at 11:06 AM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Are you serious? "block google.com"
> 
> Should we block mozilla.org too?

Answer the question, YOU said "block google.com" and "related sites", I 
did not

The question was:

Could you be more precise and give the complete list of 
safebrowsing_stuff.google.com and "related sites" that FF is using 
(including Mozilla's)?

Which is not about safebrowsing or similar only as shown in my previous 
answer and certainly not about blocking all things

Le 26/04/2015 22:26, Al Billings a écrit :
> If you're the kind of person paranoid about safebrowing pings and similar, yeah, you should pull the tinfoil hat tighter and block all things.
>
>
>
>> On Apr 26, 2015, at 11:06 AM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Are you serious? "block google.com"
>>
>> Should we block mozilla.org too?

-- 
Check the 10 M passwords list: http://peersm.com/findmyass
Anti-spies and private torrents, dynamic blocklist: http://torrent-live.org
Peersm : http://www.peersm.com
torrent-live: https://github.com/Ayms/torrent-live
node-Tor : https://www.github.com/Ayms/node-Tor
GitHub : https://www.github.com/Ayms



I'm not sure why you're asking us for the list instead of finding it yourself.



> On Apr 26, 2015, at 4:14 PM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Answer the question, YOU said "block google.com" and "related sites", I did not
> 
> The question was:
> 
> Could you be more precise and give the complete list of safebrowsing_stuff.google.com and "related sites" that FF is using (including Mozilla's)?
> 
> Which is not about safebrowsing or similar only as shown in my previous answer and certainly not about blocking all things
> 
> Le 26/04/2015 22:26, Al Billings a écrit :
>> If you're the kind of person paranoid about safebrowing pings and similar, yeah, you should pull the tinfoil hat tighter and block all things.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Apr 26, 2015, at 11:06 AM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Are you serious? "block google.com"
>>> 
>>> Should we block mozilla.org too?
> 
> -- 
> Check the 10 M passwords list: http://peersm.com/findmyass
> Anti-spies and private torrents, dynamic blocklist: http://torrent-live.org
> Peersm : http://www.peersm.com
> torrent-live: https://github.com/Ayms/torrent-live
> node-Tor : https://www.github.com/Ayms/node-Tor
> GitHub : https://www.github.com/Ayms
> 
> -- 
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.

This thread has turned belligerent, so it has been closed. Please feel free to continue discussing other subjects of interest.
Thanks,YosemOne of the moderators
On Sun, Apr 26, 2015 at 4:36 PM, Al Billings <albill at openbuddha.com> wrote:

I'm not sure why you're asking us for the list instead of finding it yourself.



> On Apr 26, 2015, at 4:14 PM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Answer the question, YOU said "block google.com" and "related sites", I did not
>
> The question was:
>
> Could you be more precise and give the complete list of safebrowsing_stuff.google.com and "related sites" that FF is using (including Mozilla's)?
>
> Which is not about safebrowsing or similar only as shown in my previous answer and certainly not about blocking all things
>
> Le 26/04/2015 22:26, Al Billings a écrit :
>> If you're the kind of person paranoid about safebrowing pings and similar, yeah, you should pull the tinfoil hat tighter and block all things.
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Apr 26, 2015, at 11:06 AM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Are you serious? "block google.com"
>>>
>>> Should we block mozilla.org too?
>
> --
> Check the 10 M passwords list: http://peersm.com/findmyass
> Anti-spies and private torrents, dynamic blocklist: http://torrent-live.org
> Peersm : http://www.peersm.com
> torrent-live: https://github.com/Ayms/torrent-live
> node-Tor : https://www.github.com/Ayms/node-Tor
> GitHub : https://www.github.com/Ayms
>
> --
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
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  Let me answer anyway.
 
 I know what is being sent outside, I have given some examples in my first reply.
 
 I don't get what's the big deal for Mozilla to clarify for everybody what FF is sending outside without the users being aware of it, for what purpose and what is inside the https message, since this is supposed to protect people.
 
 The answer "block google.com and related sites" does not really help.
 
 Le 27/04/2015 01:38, Yosem Companys a écrit :
  
 This thread has turned belligerent, so it has been closed. Please feel free to continue discussing other subjects of interest. 
  Thanks, Yosem One of the moderators  
 On Sun, Apr 26, 2015 at 4:36 PM, Al Billings <albill at openbuddha.com> wrote:
 
I'm not sure why you're asking us for the list instead of finding it yourself.
 
 
 
 > On Apr 26, 2015, at 4:14 PM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
 >
 > Answer the question, YOU said "block google.com" and "related sites", I did not
 >
 > The question was:
 >
 > Could you be more precise and give the complete list of safebrowsing_stuff.google.com and "related sites" that FF is using (including Mozilla's)?
 >
 > Which is not about safebrowsing or similar only as shown in my previous answer and certainly not about blocking all things
 >
 > Le 26/04/2015 22:26, Al Billings a écrit :
 >> If you're the kind of person paranoid about safebrowing pings and similar, yeah, you should pull the tinfoil hat tighter and block all things.
 >>
 >>
 >>
 >>> On Apr 26, 2015, at 11:06 AM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
 >>>
 >>> Are you serious? "block google.com"
 >>>
 >>> Should we block mozilla.org too?
 >
 > --
 > Check the 10 M passwords list: http://peersm.com/findmyass
 > Anti-spies and private torrents, dynamic blocklist: http://torrent-live.org
 > Peersm : http://www.peersm.com
 > torrent-live: https://github.com/Ayms/torrent-live
 > node-Tor : https://www.github.com/Ayms/node-Tor
 > GitHub : https://www.github.com/Ayms
 >
 > --
 > Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
 --
 Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
  
  
  
 
 
 -- 
Check the 10 M passwords list: http://peersm.com/findmyass
Anti-spies and private torrents, dynamic blocklist: http://torrent-live.org
Peersm : http://www.peersm.com
torrent-live: https://github.com/Ayms/torrent-live
node-Tor : https://www.github.com/Ayms/node-Tor
GitHub : https://www.github.com/Ayms From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know offlist?
I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country expertise.Regards, Nick
The IETF last year gave an award to a Nepalese gentleman, Mahabir Pun,
for connecting villages on different mountain ridges together:

https://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/gaia/current/msg00248.html

I'm not sure how to or if it's possible to get in touch with Mr. Pun
or other members of his group...

On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 8:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
> From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via
> bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
>
> If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom
> infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know
> offlist?
>
> I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country
> expertise.
>
> Regards, Nick
>
>
>
> --
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of
> list guidelines will get you moderated:
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe,
> change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at
> companys at stanford.edu.



-- 
Joseph Lorenzo Hall
Chief Technologist
Center for Democracy & Technology
1634 I ST NW STE 1100
Washington DC 20006-4011
(p) 202-407-8825
(f) 202-637-0968
joe at cdt.org
PGP: https://josephhall.org/gpg-key
fingerprint: 3CA2 8D7B 9F6D DBD3 4B10  1607 5F86 6987 40A9 A871


Nathan of Guardian <nathan at guardianproject.info> writes:

> On Sun, Apr 5, 2015, at 10:02 AM, Lluís Batlle i Rossell wrote:
>> Hello! Thank you a lot for publishing your work under GPL.
>> Do you know of a similar application for still pictures, also GPL?
>
> As poly stated, the Strongbox project is based on our (the Guardian
> Project) IOCipher encrypted mobile storage library
> (https://guardianproject.info/code), and the CipherCam library/sample
> project available here: https://github.com/n8fr8/IOCipherCameraExample
>

This is all awesome work -- thank you. But is it true that there's still
a black box in the chain? AFAIK, there is no free software support for
doing video encoding, so we still rely on the proprietary encoders for
all the Android devices I'm aware of.

-john

-- 
John Sullivan | Executive Director, Free Software Foundation
GPG Key: 61A0963B | http://status.fsf.org/johns | http://fsf.org/blogs/RSS

Do you use free software? Donate to join the FSF and support freedom at
<http://my.fsf.org/join>.

You might already know about Kathmandu Living Labs, but if not, they might be able to help: http://kathmandulivinglabs.org/ 
On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 8:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:

From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know offlist?
I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country expertise.Regards, Nick

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-- 
Lina Srivastava
--
linasrivastava.com  |  twitter  |  linkedin 


I think there's a more fundamental problem here.  We're all talking
about add-ons that perform various security/privacy functions.

Why are these add-ons?  Why are they not designed-in and built-in
to the browser?

Those are only quasi-rhetorical questions, because I'm pretty sure
we all know at least some of the answers to them.  But my point is
that I think we're well past the time when all of this functionality
should be baked-in to web browsers, not added on in a crazyquilt of
sometimes-overlapping sometimes-conflicting extensions all of which
have their own UI and most of which are confusing even to people who
know what they're doing.

As much as I really, really hate suggesting this, because one of the
last things we need is more software: we need a browser built from
the whiteboard up with the contemporary threat environment in mind.
And I strongly suspect that the only way to get one will be to start over.

Anybody got a few million dollars just laying around? ;)

---rsk


The Swedish-Finnish telco TeliaSonera operates in Nepal and is engaged in relief efforts, offering 50 free SMS and some free calling. I'll paste their email below, and find their latest alert here:  http://www.teliasonera.com/en/newsroom/news/2015/update-on-the-earthquake-i-nepal 

Peter

Update on TeliaSonera’s operations in Nepal following earthquake
TeliaSonera's majority owned company in Nepal, Ncell, is working around the clock to help and support its employees and partners after the major earthquake which hit Nepal this weekend. As of now there are no reports of any of the 515 employees being injured. Ncell also continues its work to keep the mobile network in the country running to facilitate for the rescue operations ongoing.The highest priority is and has been to locate all employees and to give them the best possible support in their very difficult personal situations. Ncell has of this morning been able to establish the whereabouts of all its employees. On early Monday morning, TeliaSonera sent an aircraft to Nepal with tents, water cleaning facilities and medical supplies to help stabilize and improve working conditions for Ncell's employees in order to secure the operations.Most of Ncell's mobile network in Nepal is working, although overloaded with several hundred sites having power supply problems. This leads to congested networks and Ncell therefore urges everyone to communicate by SMS in order to minimize the strain of the network.Ncell's crisis management team has secured support from suppliers and maintenance teams are trying to restart as many sites as possible. Right now, it is not possible to assess the damages and costs related to the earthquake.To ensure that Ncell’s customers can communicate with families and friends, Ncell has credited SIM cards with an amount sufficient to make necessary calls. Ncell also provides customers with 50 free SMS, as a first action. Calls and SMS between most of TeliaSonera' European operations and Nepal are free of charge, but due to the damage to the network, Ncell has made the judgment that it is not possible to enable free calls in Nepal as it would put additional strain to the network and risk the ongoing rescue operations. This is constantly reviewed.For more information on Ncell and the earthquake please read articles on TeliaSonera.com/newsroom.For more information, please contact the TeliaSonera press office +46 771 77 58 30, press at teliasonera.com, visit our Newsroom or follow us on Twitter @TeliaSoneraAB .

On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 9:39 AM, Lina Srivastava <lina at linasrivastava.com> wrote:

You might already know about Kathmandu Living Labs, but if not, they might be able to help: http://kathmandulivinglabs.org/ 
On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 8:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:

From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know offlist?
I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country expertise.Regards, Nick

--
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-- 
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--
linasrivastava.com  |  twitter  |  linkedin 


--
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-- 
Peter Micek
Senior Policy Counsel
Access | accessnow.org | rightscon.org
tel: +1-888-414-0100 x709
Skype: peter-r-m
Fingerprint: 6CFE 8E9F ED8E 66B8 BE38 EA59 002C EEF5 A5BD 70B0

Join the Access team - we're hiring! 
Also, Flowminder.org was in Nepal last week to set up a mobile / disaster response system there which will be fully operational this summer, and have contracts in place and the system underway, but in the meantime are working to see if they can do ad-hoc work now. Let me know if you want a contact there. 
On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 11:08 AM, Peter Micek <peter at accessnow.org> wrote:

The Swedish-Finnish telco TeliaSonera operates in Nepal and is engaged in relief efforts, offering 50 free SMS and some free calling. I'll paste their email below, and find their latest alert here:  http://www.teliasonera.com/en/newsroom/news/2015/update-on-the-earthquake-i-nepal 

Peter

Update on TeliaSonera’s operations in Nepal following earthquake
TeliaSonera's majority owned company in Nepal, Ncell, is working around the clock to help and support its employees and partners after the major earthquake which hit Nepal this weekend. As of now there are no reports of any of the 515 employees being injured. Ncell also continues its work to keep the mobile network in the country running to facilitate for the rescue operations ongoing.The highest priority is and has been to locate all employees and to give them the best possible support in their very difficult personal situations. Ncell has of this morning been able to establish the whereabouts of all its employees. On early Monday morning, TeliaSonera sent an aircraft to Nepal with tents, water cleaning facilities and medical supplies to help stabilize and improve working conditions for Ncell's employees in order to secure the operations.Most of Ncell's mobile network in Nepal is working, although overloaded with several hundred sites having power supply problems. This leads to congested networks and Ncell therefore urges everyone to communicate by SMS in order to minimize the strain of the network.Ncell's crisis management team has secured support from suppliers and maintenance teams are trying to restart as many sites as possible. Right now, it is not possible to assess the damages and costs related to the earthquake.To ensure that Ncell’s customers can communicate with families and friends, Ncell has credited SIM cards with an amount sufficient to make necessary calls. Ncell also provides customers with 50 free SMS, as a first action. Calls and SMS between most of TeliaSonera' European operations and Nepal are free of charge, but due to the damage to the network, Ncell has made the judgment that it is not possible to enable free calls in Nepal as it would put additional strain to the network and risk the ongoing rescue operations. This is constantly reviewed.For more information on Ncell and the earthquake please read articles on TeliaSonera.com/newsroom.For more information, please contact the TeliaSonera press office +46 771 77 58 30, press at teliasonera.com, visit our Newsroom or follow us on Twitter @TeliaSoneraAB .

On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 9:39 AM, Lina Srivastava <lina at linasrivastava.com> wrote:

You might already know about Kathmandu Living Labs, but if not, they might be able to help: http://kathmandulivinglabs.org/ 
On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 8:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:

From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know offlist?
I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country expertise.Regards, Nick

--
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-- 
Lina Srivastava
--
linasrivastava.com  |  twitter  |  linkedin 


--
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-- 
Peter Micek
Senior Policy Counsel
Access | accessnow.org | rightscon.org
tel: +1-888-414-0100 x709
Skype: peter-r-m
Fingerprint: 6CFE 8E9F ED8E 66B8 BE38 EA59 002C EEF5 A5BD 70B0

Join the Access team - we're hiring! 

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-- 
Lina Srivastava
--
linasrivastava.com  |  twitter  |  linkedin 

Yes please - there's a spreadsheet that a bunch of people are on and populating with contacts, from techs who can help to ministry, UN agency and the like contact people. If anyone would like to be added to add more names, just give me a gdocs address.
I'm getting a lot of incoming emails now, which is great, but which is also swamping me a bit :)

On 27 Apr 2015, at 17:34, Lina Srivastava <lina at linasrivastava.com> wrote:

Also, Flowminder.org was in Nepal last week to set up a mobile / disaster response system there which will be fully operational this summer, and have contracts in place and the system underway, but in the meantime are working to see if they can do ad-hoc work now. Let me know if you want a contact there. 
On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 11:08 AM, Peter Micek <peter at accessnow.org> wrote:

The Swedish-Finnish telco TeliaSonera operates in Nepal and is engaged in relief efforts, offering 50 free SMS and some free calling. I'll paste their email below, and find their latest alert here:  http://www.teliasonera.com/en/newsroom/news/2015/update-on-the-earthquake-i-nepal 

Peter

Update on TeliaSonera’s operations in Nepal following earthquake
TeliaSonera's majority owned company in Nepal, Ncell, is working around the clock to help and support its employees and partners after the major earthquake which hit Nepal this weekend. As of now there are no reports of any of the 515 employees being injured. Ncell also continues its work to keep the mobile network in the country running to facilitate for the rescue operations ongoing.The highest priority is and has been to locate all employees and to give them the best possible support in their very difficult personal situations. Ncell has of this morning been able to establish the whereabouts of all its employees. On early Monday morning, TeliaSonera sent an aircraft to Nepal with tents, water cleaning facilities and medical supplies to help stabilize and improve working conditions for Ncell's employees in order to secure the operations.Most of Ncell's mobile network in Nepal is working, although overloaded with several hundred sites having power supply problems. This leads to congested networks and Ncell therefore urges everyone to communicate by SMS in order to minimize the strain of the network.Ncell's crisis management team has secured support from suppliers and maintenance teams are trying to restart as many sites as possible. Right now, it is not possible to assess the damages and costs related to the earthquake.To ensure that Ncell’s customers can communicate with families and friends, Ncell has credited SIM cards with an amount sufficient to make necessary calls. Ncell also provides customers with 50 free SMS, as a first action. Calls and SMS between most of TeliaSonera' European operations and Nepal are free of charge, but due to the damage to the network, Ncell has made the judgment that it is not possible to enable free calls in Nepal as it would put additional strain to the network and risk the ongoing rescue operations. This is constantly reviewed.For more information on Ncell and the earthquake please read articles on TeliaSonera.com/newsroom.For more information, please contact the TeliaSonera press office +46 771 77 58 30, press at teliasonera.com, visit our Newsroom or follow us on Twitter @TeliaSoneraAB .

On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 9:39 AM, Lina Srivastava <lina at linasrivastava.com> wrote:

You might already know about Kathmandu Living Labs, but if not, they might be able to help: http://kathmandulivinglabs.org/ 
On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 8:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:

From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know offlist?
I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country expertise.Regards, Nick

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I had occasion to trek to Mahabir's wireless-connected village Nangi back in 2008 with a team from Winrock International. He was also being considered as an Ashoka Fellow and it appears that he achieved that status.  Perhaps either or both organizations could provide current contact info.

https://www.ashoka.org/fellow/mahabir-pun

Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: liberationtech [mailto:liberationtech-bounces at mailman.stanford.edu] On Behalf Of Joseph Lorenzo Hall
Sent: Monday, April 27, 2015 9:25 AM
To: liberationtech
Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Looking for: ICT/telecom expertise in country in Nepal

The IETF last year gave an award to a Nepalese gentleman, Mahabir Pun, for connecting villages on different mountain ridges together:

https://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/gaia/current/msg00248.html

I'm not sure how to or if it's possible to get in touch with Mr. Pun or other members of his group...

On Mon, Apr 27, 2015 at 8:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
> From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via 
> bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
>
> If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom 
> infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me 
> know offlist?
>
> I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to 
> in-country expertise.
>
> Regards, Nick
>
>
>
> --
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. 
> Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated:
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. 
> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing 
> moderator at companys at stanford.edu.



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You should go ask Mozilla then. File a bug or go to one of the dev newsgroups and ask. Maybe you’ll get an official response. The people that have that entire list is probably rather small.
I’m not speaking for Mozilla here and I certainly don’t know the full list of pings and the like. 

On Apr 27, 2015, at 2:26 AM, Aymeric Vitte <vitteaymeric at gmail.com> wrote:
I don't get what's the big deal for Mozilla to clarify for everybody what FF is sending outside without the users being aware of it, for what purpose and what is inside the https message, since this is supposed to protect people.

+ Indiver

Dear Bill,

I've certainly experienced that dynamic before. I'm very glad to hear that families are all OK. I only wish it were true for everyone, and it is great that PCH has released staff to help out - very much in the Nepali spirit I might add!

In this instance, Im not in Nepal right now, and so I won't be telling anyone what they need or anything of the sort. Nor would I be doing any of that if I were there.

I'm helping OCHA get access to a pool of people with a variety of skills - especially at the moment in 'telecom triage' but I'm sure it will rapidly expand beyond that. This is a grassroots thing with the list mostly coming from Nepalis referred by NGOs in digital policy and ISOC chapters. Microsoft's country director is helping in large part due to his connections with universities' tech programmes but in typical Nepali fashion also personally.

Indiver, if you would like to be added to the gdoc where the list is kept, directly introduced to the chap at OCHA who is helping the teams on the ground with all this, or both, let me know, I'm happy to do either or both.

FWIW, the list currently has two PCH people who have put themselves forward: Dibya Khatiwada and Rustan Shrestha. The more the merrier!

On 27 Apr 2015, at 20:12, Bill Woodcock <woody at pch.net> wrote:

> 
>> On Apr 27, 2015, at 5:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
>> From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
>> If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know offlist?
>> I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country expertise.
> 
> One of our larger offices is in Kathmandu.  Our staff and their families are all accounted for and okay, so we’ve released and funded them to do relief work.  Presumably they’ll principally be doing ICT-related work, and presumably that will be coordinated through the ICT industry association.  The current secretary of the industry association is Indiver Badal <ib at indiver.com>, who was PCH’s peering coordinator for several years.
> 
> One issue we’ve observed many times when doing relief work, perhaps worst in the 2004 tsunami, the 2003 conflict in the Congo, and 2010 in Haiti, is that areas with modest ICT infrastructure that was adequate to the sustainable needs of their market, are swamped by aid workers with immodest expectations.  i.e. a desire to video-chat with their families every day, play WoW, and download video porn.  So they all show up, and declare “repairing the Internet infrastructure” (to levels never before seen) to be their first priority.  They run rough-shod over the local infrastructure operators, step on carefully-regulated or carefully-negotiated frequency allocations, etc.
> 
> I very much hope we won’t have to deal with that in this case.  Nepal’s ICT environment is mature, its professionals are expert, and its community is well connected.  If and when they need help, they’re perfectly capable of indicating what help they need, and anyone from the outside who believes they know better is WRONG.  So, if you’re interested in helping, by all means, make your availability known to Indiver or any of the many other ICT professionals in-country, but please don’t assume that you know what’s needed, or worse, that they don’t.
> 
>                                -Bill
> 
> 
> 
> 



> On Apr 27, 2015, at 5:53 AM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
> From: Nick Ashton-Hart <nashton at consensus.pro> via bestbits at lists.bestbits.net
> If you, or someone you know, has hands-on ICTs and especially telecom infrastructure experience and is presently in Nepal can you let me know offlist?
> I'm trying to help emergency teams in country gain access to in-country expertise.

One of our larger offices is in Kathmandu.  Our staff and their families are all accounted for and okay, so we’ve released and funded them to do relief work.  Presumably they’ll principally be doing ICT-related work, and presumably that will be coordinated through the ICT industry association.  The current secretary of the industry association is Indiver Badal <ib at indiver.com>, who was PCH’s peering coordinator for several years.

One issue we’ve observed many times when doing relief work, perhaps worst in the 2004 tsunami, the 2003 conflict in the Congo, and 2010 in Haiti, is that areas with modest ICT infrastructure that was adequate to the sustainable needs of their market, are swamped by aid workers with immodest expectations.  i.e. a desire to video-chat with their families every day, play WoW, and download video porn.  So they all show up, and declare “repairing the Internet infrastructure” (to levels never before seen) to be their first priority.  They run rough-shod over the local infrastructure operators, step on carefully-regulated or carefully-negotiated frequency allocations, etc.

I very much hope we won’t have to deal with that in this case.  Nepal’s ICT environment is mature, its professionals are expert, and its community is well connected.  If and when they need help, they’re perfectly capable of indicating what help they need, and anyone from the outside who believes they know better is WRONG.  So, if you’re interested in helping, by all means, make your availability known to Indiver or any of the many other ICT professionals in-country, but please don’t assume that you know what’s needed, or worse, that they don’t.

                                -Bill





From: Stacey Maples <stacemaples at stanford.edu>

Apologies for odd language of the email. I am creating/maintaining and information page here: http://stanfordgeospatialcenter.github.io/Map4Nepal_Resources/ and have simply cut & pasted from that to save time. I will be adding more information throughout the day/week.

Please feel free to forward/blog/tweet/facebook/etc... any of this information.

Mapping4Nepal at Stanford Introductory Workshops
I'll be updating this page as I schedule new workshops to introduce volunteers to the basics of using the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Task Manager and the Tomnod to contribute to relief mapping for Nepal.
The first Introduction to OpenStreetMap.org and the Task Manager will be held TONIGHT, Monday April 27th, from 6pm to 7pm at the Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Corner in Branner Earth Science Library
Anyone interested in co-locating for Humanitarian Mapping is welcome to join me in the Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Corner, during Branner Library Hours (below) this week, beginning today at noon! You do not need to wait until the workshop, I will be there at noon, ready to show you how to help!
Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Corner Map4Nepal at Stanford Co-location & Support
Beginning at Noon, today (Monday, April 27th)I will be relocating from my office to the Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Corner in order to help support those who are interested in contributing to mapping efforts for disaster relief, in Nepal. The Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Corner is located in the Northwest Corner of the Mitchell Earth Science Building, on the 2nd floor, in the Branner Earth Sciences Library.
Anyone with a laptop and spare time is welcome to come to the Library and any of the Introductory Relief Mapping sessions I will be holding. You do not need to be a Stanford Affiliate! If you are not a Stanford affiliate, we can connect you to the Stanford Guest WiFi to work on relief mapping, or participate in the workshops.Here is a map: http://www.openstreetmap.org/?mlat=37.42656&mlon=-122.17287#map=19/37.42656/-122.17287

Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Corner Hours for Map4Nepal at Stanford
I am blocking off the schedule for the SGC Teaching Corner for the week. If you would like to co-locate and contribute to mapping, here are the hours the teaching corner will be available. I will be out of town over the weekend, but depending on need and interest, I may continue Teaching Corner Hours nest week, as well. Please note that food is not allowed in the library facilities, but drinks in spill-proof containers are acceptable.
Teaching Corner Hours:

Monday - Thursday: 9am - 9pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Mapping4Nepal at Stanford Introductory Workshops
I'll be updating this page as I schedule new workshops to introduce volunteers to the basics of using the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Task Manager and the Tomnod to contribute to relief mapping for Nepal.
The first Introduction to OpenStreetMap.org and the Task Manager will be held TONIGHT, Monday April 27th, from 6pm to 7pm

Basic Information for Contributing RIGHT NOW
If you want to contribute IMMEDIATELY to ongoing Humanitarian Mapping efforts for Nepal through Humanitarian OpenStreetMap.org, please do the following:
Go through the 30 minute training on http://mapgive.state.gov to learn the basics of humanitarian mapping using OpenStreetMap.org
Then go to the HOTOSM Task Manager at http://tasks.hotosm.org/ and select a job that you feel comfortable contributing to. Read the directions carefully for the job, then select one of the squares next to one that is marked as complete. This will allow you to pan to the completed square so you can see how others are digitizing the features and mimic their work.
It doesn't matter how long you work, or how many features you digitize. There are currently hundreds of people mapping on HOTOSM for the Nepal Earthquake.Every edit counts.You can also help assess damage, as new imagery becomes available. See this DigitalGlobe post for information:http://www.digitalglobeblog.com/2015/04/26/digitalglobe-opens-access-to-satellite-data-to-support-disaster-response-efforts-in-nepal/
Obtaining the latest OSM Data for use in Relief Efforts
If you are a responder, or working with any organization that needs the most up-to-date geodata for the region, a consulting company called Geofabrik has set up a download site for OSM data that will be updated every 30 minutes throughout the HOTOSM activation. Find the data in various formats (including Garmin, Shapefile, etc...) here: http://labs.geofabrik.de/nepal/

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