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[liberationtech] liberationtech Digest, Vol 231, Issue 1

Kristian Simsarian ksimsarian at cca.edu
Wed Jan 28 05:25:29 PST 2015


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> On Jan 27, 2015, at 16:29, liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu wrote:
> 
> Send liberationtech mailing list submissions to
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> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of liberationtech digest..."
> 
> 
> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform (hellekin)
>   2. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform (marietta le)
>   3. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform (Douglas Bagnall)
>   4. The missing tech between TBB , Whoonix and Tails
>      (Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists)
>   5. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform (malte at wk3.org)
>   6. Re: The missing tech between TBB ,    Whoonix and Tails
>      (Eduardo Robles Elvira)
>   7. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform (Amin Sabeti)
>   8. Re: The missing tech between TBB ,    Whoonix and Tails
>      (Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists)
>   9. Re: The missing tech between TBB ,    Whoonix and Tails
>      (Nathan of Guardian)
>  10. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform (Jens Kubieziel)
>  11. 3D Printing Prosthetics: A conversation with Jon    Schull    and
>      Jeremy    Simon of e-NABLE (January 22,    2015 | 10:00-11:00 am EST)
>      (Nick Martin)
>  12. Internet repression continues in Cuba (Myself)
>  13. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform (Griffin Boyce)
>  14. Re: Open Source Videoconference platform
>      (Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes)
>  15. CAMRI seminar 28/1: Clint Burnham on Slavoj ?i?ek and the
>      Internet (Christian Fuchs)
>  16. Re: CAMRI seminar 28/1: Clint Burnham on Slavoj ?i?ek and the
>      Internet (Travis Biehn)
>  17. Computational Epidemiology: The role of big data and
>      pervasive * 4:15PM, Wed January 21, 2015 in Gates B03 (Yosem Companys)
>  18. UC Berkeley CITRIS Research Exchange for the    Spring is now
>      online (Yosem Companys)
>  19. [SPAM:####] [SPAM:###] Davos 2015 takes aim at the future of
>      the internet (and cyber-security) (Andrea St)
>  20. mySociety's new $3.6M investment from Omidyar Network, seeks
>      to grow Poplus civic tech collaboration (Steven Clift)
>  21. Stanford Liberationtech Seminar: Will revolution    be tweeted?
>      - Jan 29 (Yosem Companys)
>  22. CfP - International Journal of Communication Special Issue -
>      (Un)civil Society in Digital China (Jiang, Min)
>  23. Net neutrality case in Slovenia (Mitar)
>  24. Re: Net neutrality case in Slovenia (Rejo Zenger)
>  25. Testers sought for PassLok privacy (Francisco Ruiz)
>  26. Teknokultura Journal - latest issue (Javier de Rivera)
>  27. Call ESA 2015 Conference: ?Critical Media Sociology Today?
>      (Christian Fuchs)
>  28. The Future of Security Journalism (J.M. Porup)
>  29. Re: The Future of Security Journalism (Eleanor Saitta)
>  30. Re: The Future of Security Journalism (J.M. Porup)
>  31. Free TechChange-USAID Course: How To Use Mobile Data
>      Solutions for Better Development Outcomes (Nick Martin)
>  32. Marisol Sandoval: From Corporate to Social Media (CAMRI
>      Seminar Feb 4) (Christian Fuchs)
>  33. Open Data Day Micro Grants - ODD is Feb 21st (Steven Clift)
>  34. Re: Iranian are bypass the Twitter censorship and sanction by
>      their mobile phones (Collin Anderson)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 22:19:14 -0300
> From: hellekin <hellekin at gnu.org>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID: <54BC5B92.4000305 at gnu.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
> 
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA512
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>> On 01/18/2015 11:16 AM, Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes wrote:
>> Is there such a thing? Reliable? Skype sucks, and it is a Microsoft product
>> now (too flickery, etc.), and I don't know of others..
> *** Tox (https://tox.im/) is a promising alternative to Jitsi and
> XMPP/SIP.  It specifically aims at replacing Skype.  Still early, but
> already impressive.
> 
> ==
> hk
> 
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> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 11:57:52 +0800
> From: marietta le <marietta at atlatszo.hu>
> To: alps at acm.org, liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID: <97caf629-cf92-4f4e-80ca-eb316067074d at email.android.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> https://vline.com/
> maybe?
> 
>> On 18 January 2015 22:16:22 GMT+08:00, "Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes" <alps6085 at gmail.com> wrote:
>> Is there such a thing? Reliable? Skype sucks, and it is a Microsoft
>> product
>> now (too flickery, etc.), and I don't know of others..
>> 
>> Best Regards | Cordiales Saludos | Grato,
>> 
>> Andr?s L. Pacheco Sanfuentes
>> <alps at acm.org>
>> +1 (347) 766-5008
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> 
>> -- 
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google.
>> Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated:
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.
>> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator
>> at companys at stanford.edu.
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 21:03:03 +1300
> From: Douglas Bagnall <douglas at halo.gen.nz>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID: <54BCBA37.3010500 at halo.gen.nz>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
>> On 19/01/15 03:16, Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes wrote:
>> Is there such a thing? Reliable? Skype sucks, and it is a Microsoft product
>> now (too flickery, etc.), and I don't know of others..
> 
> In a lightening talk at LCA 2015, Fran?ois Marier demonstrated a new
> browser button in Firefox 34 that provides a link setting up a WebRTC
> video connection:
> 
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=_n2TPYk5KaU#t=1060
> 
> It may not be the most featureful or secure alternative, and it uses
> the same underlying WebRTC technology as many others mentioned, but it
> does have the advantage of requiring no install or sign-up from either
> party.
> 
> https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/hello/ has a bit more.
> 
> cheers,
> Douglas
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 09:13:53 +0100
> From: "Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists" <lists at infosecurity.ch>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] The missing tech between TBB , Whoonix and
>    Tails
> Message-ID: <54BCBCC1.5000509 at infosecurity.ch>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> today when a user need to have some degree of protection for his network
> connectivity, for his browser experience, for his data stored and in the
> end for his "endpoint safety & integrity" (his computer) there are few
> options:
> - Tor Browser Bundle (an App)
> - Tails (an operating system replacement)
> - Whoonix (a virtual machine)
> 
>> From a security, technical and usability perspective we acknowledge how
> those approach are different each other.
> 
> I don't see a usable solutions that provide various advantages of Tails
> with the VM approach of Whoonix while behaving with the same usability
> of TBB (being an App).
> 
> To make it short:
> - Tor Browser Bundle is usable, the user does not need to change it's
> "operating environment"
> - Tails it's a pain to install and to use, force the user to change it's
> "operating environment" and use it in an exclusive way
> - Whoonix it's less a pain to install than Tails, force the user to
> change it's "operating environment" but it can be used in parallel to
> the existing "operating environment" (Windows, MacOS X)
> 
> Now, i see that there is something missing among all that various
> technologies that can be:
> * Deployed as a self-contained app (like TBB)
> * Works in parallel with the existing operating environment of the
> end-user (Like Whoonix)
> * Provide the safety of operating in a Virtual Machine (like Whoonix)
> * Be integrate within the user operating environment (like VMWare
> integration with Windows App)
> 
> The only similar approach i found is this "BitBox" made by the German
> company Sirrix, used by the German Government, that's basically a sort
> of "Whoonix" but usable like-an-app from the end-user perspective:
> http://www.sirrix.com/content/pages/BitBox_en.htm
> 
> It would be a very interesting and challenging project to see Tails or
> Whoonix or TBB to evolve in that direction, opening up tons of new users.
> 
> -- 
> Fabio Pietrosanti (naif)
> HERMES - Center for Transparency and Digital Human Rights
> http://logioshermes.org - https://globaleaks.org - https://tor2web.org - https://ahmia.fi
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 08:48:49 +0100
> From: "malte at wk3.org" <malte at wk3.org>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID: <20150119084849.ee17331264a1015406bf82e1 at wk3.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
> 
> Regarding all the web browser video conferencing tools. They are all WebRTC aren't they?
> 
> In the end it is the browser which is doing the technical heavy-lifting, the webpages are only for negotiating the channel for the different parties to meet.
> 
> Regarding encryption, recording and multi-party conferencing: I'm also very much interested in these topics as I didn't have had time to investigate this technology much because I don't need it myself, but I'm asked about these things very often.
> 
> 
> Sincerely,
> 
> Malte
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 10:05:26 +0100
> From: Eduardo Robles Elvira <edulix at agoravoting.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The missing tech between TBB ,    Whoonix
>    and Tails
> Message-ID:
>    <CAHwZu3c8QkKh2v54-uTgtQcp3Y+=miyKDsU=x47-M2o4UGpu0A at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> Hello Fabio:
> 
> Do you know about Qubes OS? http://qubes-os.org/ It might be of interest to you.
> 
> Regards,
> Eduardo Robles Elvira     @edulix             skype: edulix2
> http://agoravoting.org       @agoravoting     +34 634 571 634
> 
> 
> On Mon, Jan 19, 2015 at 9:13 AM, Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists
> <lists at infosecurity.ch> wrote:
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> today when a user need to have some degree of protection for his network
>> connectivity, for his browser experience, for his data stored and in the
>> end for his "endpoint safety & integrity" (his computer) there are few
>> options:
>> - Tor Browser Bundle (an App)
>> - Tails (an operating system replacement)
>> - Whoonix (a virtual machine)
>> 
>> From a security, technical and usability perspective we acknowledge how
>> those approach are different each other.
>> 
>> I don't see a usable solutions that provide various advantages of Tails
>> with the VM approach of Whoonix while behaving with the same usability
>> of TBB (being an App).
>> 
>> To make it short:
>> - Tor Browser Bundle is usable, the user does not need to change it's
>> "operating environment"
>> - Tails it's a pain to install and to use, force the user to change it's
>> "operating environment" and use it in an exclusive way
>> - Whoonix it's less a pain to install than Tails, force the user to
>> change it's "operating environment" but it can be used in parallel to
>> the existing "operating environment" (Windows, MacOS X)
>> 
>> Now, i see that there is something missing among all that various
>> technologies that can be:
>> * Deployed as a self-contained app (like TBB)
>> * Works in parallel with the existing operating environment of the
>> end-user (Like Whoonix)
>> * Provide the safety of operating in a Virtual Machine (like Whoonix)
>> * Be integrate within the user operating environment (like VMWare
>> integration with Windows App)
>> 
>> The only similar approach i found is this "BitBox" made by the German
>> company Sirrix, used by the German Government, that's basically a sort
>> of "Whoonix" but usable like-an-app from the end-user perspective:
>> http://www.sirrix.com/content/pages/BitBox_en.htm
>> 
>> It would be a very interesting and challenging project to see Tails or
>> Whoonix or TBB to evolve in that direction, opening up tons of new users.
>> 
>> --
>> Fabio Pietrosanti (naif)
>> HERMES - Center for Transparency and Digital Human Rights
>> http://logioshermes.org - https://globaleaks.org - https://tor2web.org - https://ahmia.fi
>> 
>> --
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 10:42:06 +0000
> From: Amin Sabeti <aminsabeti at gmail.com>
> To: alps at acm.org, liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID:
>    <CAKDS_Vea2nE0C+jU4ZReO-1p-k-bT0wEJiK8TYRZJHxxyJ7E4g at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Jitsi works perfectly for low-bandwidth consumption and easy to use for
> non-techies.
> 
> On 18 January 2015 at 23:06, Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes <
> alps6085 at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> Are these platforms scalable to many participants? easy to use for
>> non-techies? low-bandwidth consumption? easy to share live via ustream or
>> other live video streaming platform? easy to record and post later in
>> youtube or other widely available video platforms?
>> 
>> 
>> Best Regards | Cordiales Saludos | Grato,
>> 
>> Andr?s L. Pacheco Sanfuentes
>> <alps at acm.org>
>> +1 (347) 766-5008
>> 
>> On Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 4:30 PM, Julian Oliver <julian at julianoliver.com>
>> wrote:
>> 
>>> ..on Sun, Jan 18, 2015 at 08:16:22AM -0600, Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco
>>> Sanfuentes wrote:
>>>> Is there such a thing? Reliable? Skype sucks, and it is a Microsoft
>>> product
>>>> now (too flickery, etc.), and I don't know of others..
>>> 
>>> Jitsi with XMPP (jabber) works well for me. I've given a few video
>>> lectures
>>> using it.
>>> 
>>>    https://jitsi.org/
>>>    https://jitsi.org/index.php/Register/Register
>>> 
>>> With Chromium or Chrome you can also use Jiti purely in the browser,
>>> albeit I
>>> haven't had great luck with it:
>>> 
>>>    https://meet.jit.si/
>>> 
>>> A similar offering is:
>>> 
>>>    http://talky.io
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> 
>>> --
>>> Julian Oliver
>>> http://julianoliver.com
>>> http://criticalengineering.org
>>> PGP key: https://julianoliver.com/key.asc
>>> Beware the auto-complete life.
>> 
>> --
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
>> of list guidelines will get you moderated:
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.
>> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at
>> companys at stanford.edu.
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 8
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 13:54:15 +0100
> From: "Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists" <lists at infosecurity.ch>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The missing tech between TBB ,    Whoonix
>    and Tails
> Message-ID: <54BCFE77.6090109 at infosecurity.ch>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
> 
>> On 1/19/15 10:05 AM, Eduardo Robles Elvira wrote:
>> Hello Fabio:
>> 
>> Do you know about Qubes OS? http://qubes-os.org/ It might be of interest to you.
>> 
>> Regards,
>> Eduardo Robles Elvira     @edulix             skype: edulix2
>> http://agoravoting.org       @agoravoting     +34 634 571 634
> Qube-Os it's a great platform, but it require you to install a new
> operating system on your computer.
> 
> My topic of discussion is on how to provide "safe enough" applications
> in the existing operating environment, that the average
> non-computer-proficient user don't want / can't abbandon.
> 
> There are many people that use a computer "procedurally", the learned
> "procedure" to do stuff, and once those procedure completely because the
> entire operating environment change, it's likely "too hard" .
> 
> Sounds like there's no easy-go-solution for that kind of users
> 
> -- 
> Fabio Pietrosanti (naif)
> HERMES - Center for Transparency and Digital Human Rights
> http://logioshermes.org - https://globaleaks.org - https://tor2web.org - https://ahmia.fi
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 9
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 08:51:32 -0500
> From: Nathan of Guardian <nathan at guardianproject.info>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The missing tech between TBB ,    Whoonix
>    and Tails
> Message-ID:
>    <1421675492.2708736.215739065.6F66A77A at webmail.messagingengine.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain
> 
> 
> 
> On Mon, Jan 19, 2015, at 03:13 AM, Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists
> wrote:
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> today when a user need to have some degree of protection for his network
>> connectivity, for his browser experience, for his data stored and in the
>> end for his "endpoint safety & integrity" (his computer) there are few
>> options:
>> - Tor Browser Bundle (an App)
>> - Tails (an operating system replacement)
>> - Whoonix (a virtual machine)
>> 
>> From a security, technical and usability perspective we acknowledge how
>> those approach are different each other.
>> 
>> I don't see a usable solutions that provide various advantages of Tails
>> with the VM approach of Whoonix while behaving with the same usability
>> of TBB (being an App).
>> 
>> To make it short:
>> - Tor Browser Bundle is usable, the user does not need to change it's
>> "operating environment"
>> - Tails it's a pain to install and to use, force the user to change it's
>> "operating environment" and use it in an exclusive way
> 
> You can run TAILS as an app inside of QEMU or VirtualBox: 
> https://tails.boum.org/doc/advanced_topics/virtualization/tails_within_windows/index.en.html
> 
> Do you mean something more than that? Obviously work could be done on
> one-click boot from a shortcut etc but I think it wouldn't take much.
> 
> Obviously it isn't the safest approach, but within your goals it seems a
> viable solution.
> 
>> - Whoonix it's less a pain to install than Tails, force the user to
>> change it's "operating environment" but it can be used in parallel to
>> the existing "operating environment" (Windows, MacOS X)
>> 
>> Now, i see that there is something missing among all that various
>> technologies that can be:
>> * Deployed as a self-contained app (like TBB)
>> * Works in parallel with the existing operating environment of the
>> end-user (Like Whoonix)
>> * Provide the safety of operating in a Virtual Machine (like Whoonix)
>> * Be integrate within the user operating environment (like VMWare
>> integration with Windows App)
>> 
>> The only similar approach i found is this "BitBox" made by the German
>> company Sirrix, used by the German Government, that's basically a sort
>> of "Whoonix" but usable like-an-app from the end-user perspective:
>> http://www.sirrix.com/content/pages/BitBox_en.htm
>> 
>> It would be a very interesting and challenging project to see Tails or
>> Whoonix or TBB to evolve in that direction, opening up tons of new users.
>> 
>> -- 
>> Fabio Pietrosanti (naif)
>> HERMES - Center for Transparency and Digital Human Rights
>> http://logioshermes.org - https://globaleaks.org - https://tor2web.org -
>> https://ahmia.fi
>> 
>> -- 
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
>> of list guidelines will get you moderated:
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.
>> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator
>> at companys at stanford.edu.
> 
> 
> -- 
>  Nathan of Guardian
>  nathan at guardianproject.info
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 10
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:31:25 +0100
> From: Jens Kubieziel <maillist at kubieziel.de>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID: <20150119153125.GB1179 at kubieziel.de>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
> 
> * Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes schrieb am 2015-01-18 um 15:16 Uhr:
>> Is there such a thing? Reliable? Skype sucks, and it is a Microsoft product
>> now (too flickery, etc.), and I don't know of others..
> 
> Another viable solution is palava.tv. This service uses WebRTC. See
> <URL:https://palava.tv/> for details.
> -- 
> Jens Kubieziel                                   http://www.kubieziel.de
> Man kann aus jedem Gespr?ch, bei dem man selbst nicht dauernd redet,
> sondern ganz einfach zuh?rt, unendlich viel erfahren und lernen. Professor.
> Dr. Roman Herzog
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 11
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:01:15 -0000
> From: Nick Martin <nick at techchange.org>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: [liberationtech] 3D Printing Prosthetics: A conversation with
>    Jon    Schull    and    Jeremy    Simon of e-NABLE (January 22,    2015 | 10:00-11:00
>    am EST)
> Message-ID: <20150118150756.5202.32806 at ip-10-185-135-33.ec2.internal>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Want to learn about how 3D printing technologies are being used to promote 
> social good? 
> 
> TechChange <http://techchange.org/> will host this free one-hour live 
> conversation on January 22nd at 10:00am EST.
> 
> To participate, please register here 
> <http://techchange.org/live-events/tech-talks/3d-printing-prosthetics/>.
> 
> Once you have registered, you will receive an email about an hour before 
> the event begins with a reminder and link to join. You will not need to 
> register again if you register early.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Nick 
> 
> 
> ***
> 
> e-NABLE <http://enablingthefuture.org/> is a global online community of 
> humanitarian volunteers designing, building and disseminating inexpensive, 
> functional 3D-printed prosthetics.
> 
> ? e-NABLE 3D-printed prosthetic hands cost approximately $50, compared to 
> traditional devices priced in the thousands of dollars.
> 
> ? Providing affordable devices to children with upper-limb differences, 
> including missing fingers, increases opportunities for play and interaction 
> with the world around them.
> 
> ? Many children have to wait until they are fully grown in order to receive 
> their first prosthetic; with 3D printing, new and affordable custom 
> prosthetics can easily be made for children as they grow.
> 
> Please register in advance to participate in this free live event. If you 
> cannot attend the event live, the session will be recorded and archived so 
> anyone will still be able to sign up to see it after January 22.
> 
> 
> <http://api.ning.com/files/1asLTm0wi-tl47FotZgKYWSOeNqYbiYLi1A985UxYB3VZfru7qnf7jaR*8UW5X7-UNFxzIhVpbJB5eoHfpDjPptE-6Th6b8O/enable2.jpg>
> 
> To participate, please register here: 
> http://techchange.org/live-events/tech-talks/3d-printing-prosthetics/
> 
> -- 
> Nick Martin
> Founder & President
> TechChange
> @ncmart <https://twitter.com/ncmart>
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 12
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 12:03:00 -0500
> From: Myself <falcocom25 at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Internet repression continues in Cuba
> Message-ID:
>    <CAKr3FCAX5z5LVLzcD5CFXE8nPA7d+uu+Y9pkW2+drB84So509Q at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> For those following Cuba events:
> 
> Internet repression continues in Cuba. Young computer tech in Cuba sent to
> prison for sharing Internet access through Wi-Fi. The way this was working
> was several youth got together and shared the cost of an hour ($5 an hour,
> most Cubans make $20 a month) of access at one of the few hotels that allow
> Wi-Fi connections. The government is cracking down on these Wi-Fi
> gatherings once again, after the one way deals with the US.
> 
> Technical details: They were using the software "Connectify Hotspot" for
> sharing Internet access through Wi-Fi on their laptops.
> 
> http://www.cubanet.org/noticias/detienen-a-joven-informatico-por-compartir-internet/
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 13
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 17:45:39 -0500
> From: Griffin Boyce <griffin at cryptolab.net>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID: <1f9d4a62195f2d118bd842c895f3bea1 at cryptolab.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed
> 
> Jens Kubieziel wrote:
>> * Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes schrieb am 2015-01-18 um 15:16 
>> Uhr:
>>> Is there such a thing? Reliable? Skype sucks, and it is a Microsoft 
>>> product
>>> now (too flickery, etc.), and I don't know of others..
>> 
>> Another viable solution is palava.tv. This service uses WebRTC. See
>> <URL:https://palava.tv/> for details.
> 
> My preference is talky.io .  They also use WebRTC, and have a very 
> straightforward interface.  Their system is built on open-source free 
> software, which makes it an attractive choice.
> 
> ~Griffin
> 
> -- 
> "Cypherpunks write code, not flamewars."
> ~Jurre van Bergen
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 14
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 17:47:08 -0600
> From: Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes <alps6085 at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Open Source Videoconference platform
> Message-ID:
>    <CALz+F5sSv3a6aQRHkNVBsLJ3uoDDwVGNM2vWqtqAB9p34Te4Fw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Thanks are due to y'all people's suggestions, recommendations, terse
> reviews of open source videoconferencing sw.
> 
> I asked the question in part to get valuable info on alternatives to the
> 1%sw when it comes to connecting the other 95% in solidarity,  but also to
> test this list.
> 
> I have to confess that between the SNA sorry NAS sorry NSA paranoia and the
> plomo parejo between ultrarich-techie guanabis and hardcore militechtants,
> I didn't know if there were others out there for which this lemma was their
> motto:
> 
> "Cypherpunks write code, not flamewars." ~Jurre van Bergen" - thanks the
> last Guy that sent a suggestion for the inspiring signature quote!
> 
> Osea. We live. We breathe. Let's keep it that way for as many people as we
> can!
>> On Jan 19, 2015 4:45 PM, "Griffin Boyce" <griffin at cryptolab.net> wrote:
>> 
>> Jens Kubieziel wrote:
>> 
>>> * Andr?s Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes schrieb am 2015-01-18 um 15:16 Uhr:
>>> 
>>>> Is there such a thing? Reliable? Skype sucks, and it is a Microsoft
>>>> product
>>>> now (too flickery, etc.), and I don't know of others..
>>> 
>>> Another viable solution is palava.tv. This service uses WebRTC. See
>>> <URL:https://palava.tv/> for details.
>> 
>> My preference is talky.io .  They also use WebRTC, and have a very
>> straightforward interface.  Their system is built on open-source free
>> software, which makes it an attractive choice.
>> 
>> ~Griffin
>> 
>> --
>> "Cypherpunks write code, not flamewars."
>> ~Jurre van Bergen
>> 
>> --
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
>> of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/
>> mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>> password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
> -------------- next part --------------
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 15
> Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 10:35:20 +0000
> From: Christian Fuchs <christian.fuchs at uti.at>
> To: "liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu >> liberationtech"
>    <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] CAMRI seminar 28/1: Clint Burnham on Slavoj
>    ?i?ek and the  Internet
> Message-ID: <54BE2F68.7000805 at uti.at>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
> 
> CAMRI seminar
> Clint Burnham: The Subject Supposed to LOL: Slavoj ?i?ek and the Event 
> of the Internet
> Wed, 28/1, 14:00
> Univ of Westminster
> Harrow Campus
> Room A7.01
> 
> Registration is possible by e-mail to christian.fuchs at uti.at
> 
> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/clint-burnham-the-subject-supposed-to-lol-slavoj-iek-and-the-event-of-the-internet
> 
> Is the Internet an Event? Does it constitute, as ?i?ek argues an Event 
> should, a reframing of our experience, a retroactive re-ordering of 
> everything we thought we knew about the social but were afraid to ask 
> Facebook?
> 
> In this talk Clint Burnham will engage with ?i?ek?s recent work (Less 
> than Nothing, Event, Absolute Recoil) as a way to argue, first, that in 
> order to understand the Internet, we need ?i?ek?s ?immaterial 
> materialism,? and, in turn, to understand ?i?ek?s thought and how it 
> circulates today, we need to think through digital culture and social 
> media. ??As regards the Internet, then, no cynical disavowal, no 
> Facebook cleanses, no shutting off the wifi: les non-dupes errent, or 
> those who distance themselves from social media and the like are the 
> most deceived. Next: the Internet?s two bodies: digital culture is both 
> the material world of servers, clouds, stacks and devices and the 
> virtual or affective world of liking, networking, and the mirror stage 
> of the selfie. And here we must confront the ?obscene underside? of 
> digital culture: not only the trolls, 4chan porn, and gamergate bro?s, 
> but also the old fashioned exploitation of labour, be it iPhone 
> assembly-line workers at Foxconn, super-exploited ?blood coltan? miners 
> in the Congo, ?like farmers? in India, or social media scrubbers in the 
> Phillipines, who ensure your feeds are ?clean? of porn, beheadings, and 
> other #NSFW matter. These last concerns, then, mean we also have to 
> think about what ?i?ek calls the ?undoing of the Event? of the Internet, 
> the betrayal of the Internet, its diseventalization.
> 
> Clint Burnham teaches in the department of English at Simon Fraser 
> University, Vancouver, Canada. He is the author of more than a dozen 
> books of criticism, poetry, and fiction, including The Jamesonian 
> Unconscious: The Aesthetics of Marxist Theory (1995), The Only Poetry 
> that Matters: Reading the Kootenay School of Writing (2011), editor 
> (with Lorna Brown) of the public art catalogue Digital Natives (2011), 
> and editor (with Paul Budra) of From Text to Txting: New Media in the 
> Classroom (2012). His essay ?Slavoj ?i?ek as Internet Philosopher? is in 
> the recent Palgrave collection ?i?ek and Media Studies (eds. Matthew 
> Flisfeder and Louis-Paul Willis), and he is currently writing a book on 
> ?i?ek and digital culture called Does the Internet have an Unconscious? 
> In the winter of 2014-15 he is living and working in Vienna as part of a 
> residency with the Urban Subjects collective.
> 
> Forthcoming talks (open for registration)
> 
> Feb 4: Marisol Sandoval - From Corporate to Social Media: Critical 
> Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility in Media and 
> Communication Industries
> 
> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/marisol-sandoval-from-corporate-to-social-media-critical-perspectives-on-corporate-social-responsibility-in-media-and-communication-industries
> 
> Feb 11: Justin Lewis - Beyond Consumer Capitalism: A Movie Screening and 
> Q&A with Justin Lewis
> 
> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/justin-lewis-beyond-consumer-capitalism-a-movie-screening-and-q-and-a-with-justin-lewis
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 16
> Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 12:08:27 -0500
> From: Travis Biehn <tbiehn at gmail.com>
> To: christian.fuchs at uti.at, liberationtech
>    <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] CAMRI seminar 28/1: Clint Burnham on
>    Slavoj ?i?ek and the Internet
> Message-ID:
>    <CAKtE3zdhwt+QWWKqp_F=2sZZ_FeAotOz_xmthm99Ae-V40rk+w at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Will a feed be made available?
> 
> Thanks,
> -Travis
> 
> On Tue, Jan 20, 2015 at 5:35 AM, Christian Fuchs <christian.fuchs at uti.at>
> wrote:
> 
>> CAMRI seminar
>> Clint Burnham: The Subject Supposed to LOL: Slavoj ?i?ek and the Event of
>> the Internet
>> Wed, 28/1, 14:00
>> Univ of Westminster
>> Harrow Campus
>> Room A7.01
>> 
>> Registration is possible by e-mail to christian.fuchs at uti.at
>> 
>> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/clint-
>> burnham-the-subject-supposed-to-lol-slavoj-iek-and-the-
>> event-of-the-internet
>> 
>> Is the Internet an Event? Does it constitute, as ?i?ek argues an Event
>> should, a reframing of our experience, a retroactive re-ordering of
>> everything we thought we knew about the social but were afraid to ask
>> Facebook?
>> 
>> In this talk Clint Burnham will engage with ?i?ek?s recent work (Less than
>> Nothing, Event, Absolute Recoil) as a way to argue, first, that in order to
>> understand the Internet, we need ?i?ek?s ?immaterial materialism,? and, in
>> turn, to understand ?i?ek?s thought and how it circulates today, we need to
>> think through digital culture and social media. As regards the Internet,
>> then, no cynical disavowal, no Facebook cleanses, no shutting off the wifi:
>> les non-dupes errent, or those who distance themselves from social media
>> and the like are the most deceived. Next: the Internet?s two bodies:
>> digital culture is both the material world of servers, clouds, stacks and
>> devices and the virtual or affective world of liking, networking, and the
>> mirror stage of the selfie. And here we must confront the ?obscene
>> underside? of digital culture: not only the trolls, 4chan porn, and
>> gamergate bro?s, but also the old fashioned exploitation of labour, be it
>> iPhone assembly-line workers at Foxconn, super-exploited ?blood coltan?
>> miners in the Congo, ?like farmers? in India, or social media scrubbers in
>> the Phillipines, who ensure your feeds are ?clean? of porn, beheadings, and
>> other #NSFW matter. These last concerns, then, mean we also have to think
>> about what ?i?ek calls the ?undoing of the Event? of the Internet, the
>> betrayal of the Internet, its diseventalization.
>> 
>> Clint Burnham teaches in the department of English at Simon Fraser
>> University, Vancouver, Canada. He is the author of more than a dozen books
>> of criticism, poetry, and fiction, including The Jamesonian Unconscious:
>> The Aesthetics of Marxist Theory (1995), The Only Poetry that Matters:
>> Reading the Kootenay School of Writing (2011), editor (with Lorna Brown) of
>> the public art catalogue Digital Natives (2011), and editor (with Paul
>> Budra) of From Text to Txting: New Media in the Classroom (2012). His essay
>> ?Slavoj ?i?ek as Internet Philosopher? is in the recent Palgrave collection
>> ?i?ek and Media Studies (eds. Matthew Flisfeder and Louis-Paul Willis), and
>> he is currently writing a book on ?i?ek and digital culture called Does the
>> Internet have an Unconscious? In the winter of 2014-15 he is living and
>> working in Vienna as part of a residency with the Urban Subjects collective.
>> 
>> Forthcoming talks (open for registration)
>> 
>> Feb 4: Marisol Sandoval - From Corporate to Social Media: Critical
>> Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility in Media and Communication
>> Industries
>> 
>> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/
>> marisol-sandoval-from-corporate-to-social-media-critical-perspectives-on-
>> corporate-social-responsibility-in-media-and-communication-industries
>> 
>> Feb 11: Justin Lewis - Beyond Consumer Capitalism: A Movie Screening and
>> Q&A with Justin Lewis
>> 
>> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/
>> justin-lewis-beyond-consumer-capitalism-a-movie-screening-
>> and-q-and-a-with-justin-lewis
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
>> of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/
>> mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change
>> password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Twitter <https://twitter.com/tbiehn> | LinkedIn
> <http://www.linkedin.com/in/travisbiehn> | GitHub <http://github.com/tbiehn>
> | TravisBiehn.com <http://www.travisbiehn.com> | Google Plus
> <https://plus.google.com/+TravisBiehn>
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 17
> Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 10:31:03 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Computational Epidemiology: The role of big
>    data and pervasive * 4:15PM, Wed January 21, 2015 in Gates B03
> Message-ID:
>    <CANhci9EKrdCnzsAJaqcjZ-P3CrBjDL+k59L4o+T5gxEwW2OJkw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium
>  4:15PM, Wednesday, January 21, 2015
> NEC Auditorium, Gates Computer Science Building Room B3
> http://ee380.stanford.edu
> 
> 
> Computational Epidemiology: The role of big data and pervasive informatics
> 
>  Madhav Marathe
> Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory
> Virginia Bio-Informatics Institute
> Dept. of Computer Science
> Virginia Tech
> 
> *CORRECTION: This talk will be given January 21 not January 14 as
> previously announced.*
> *About the talk: *
> 
> Pandemics such as H1N1 influenza are global outbreaks of infectious
> disease. Human behavior, social contact networks, and pandemics are closely
> intertwined. The ordinary behavior and daily activities of individuals
> create varied and dense social interactions that are characteristic of
> modern urban societies. They provide a perfect fabric for rapid,
> uncontrolled disease propagation. During the course of an epidemic,
> individuals and institutions modify their normal behavior based on their
> perceived severity and risk. The resulting co-evolution of individual and
> collective behaviors, contact networks and epidemics must be taken into
> account while designing effective planning and response strategies.
> 
> Recent advances in high performance pervasive computing and big data have
> created new opportunities for collecting, integrating, analyzing and
> accessing information about evolving social interactions. The advances in
> network and information science that build on this new capability provide
> entirely new ways for reasoning and controlling epidemics.
> 
> In this talk I will overview of the state of the art in computational
> networked epidemiology with an emphasis on computational thinking and high
> performance computing oriented decision-support environments to support
> planning and response in the event of pandemics. I will describe our
> approach within the context of a specific recent application: modeling to
> support Ebola Outbreak Response in West Africa.
> 
> *Slides: *
> 
> There is no downloadable version of the slides for this talk available at
> this time.
> 
> *Videos: *
> 
> 
>   -  Join the live presentation.
>   <http://coursematerials.stanford.edu/live/ee380.asx> Wednesday January
>   21, 4:15-5:30.  Requires Microsoft Windows Media player.
>   - View video by lecture sequence.
>   <https://mvideos.stanford.edu/graduate#/SeminarDetail/Winter/2015/EE/380>
>   Winter 2015 only, HTML5. Available after 8PM on the days of the lecture.
>   - View Video on YouTube about 24 hours after the day of the lecture.
> 
> *About the speaker: *
> 
>  [image: [speaker photo]]  Madhav Marathe is the director of the Network
> Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory and professor in the Department
> of Computer Science, Virginia Tech. His research interests are in
> computational epidemiology, network science, design and analysis of
> algorithms, computational complexity, communication networks and high
> performance computing.
> 
> Before coming to Virginia Tech, he was a Team Leader in the Computer and
> Computational Sciences division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory
> (LANL) where he led the basic research programs in foundations of computing
> and high performance simulation science for analyzing extremely large
> socio-technical and critical infrastructure systems. He is a Fellow of the
> IEEE, ACM and was recently elected as an AAAS Fellow.
> 
>  *Contact information: *
> 
> Madhav Marathe
> Email:   mmarathe at vbi.vt.edu
> 
> *ABOUT THE COLLOQUIUM:*
> 
> See the Colloquium website, http://ee380.stanford.edu, for scheduled
> speakers, FAQ, and additional information. Stanford and SCPD students can
> enroll in EE380 for one unit of credit. Anyone is welcome to attend; talks
> are webcast live and archived for on-demand viewing over the web.
> -------------- next part --------------
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 18
> Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 11:26:59 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu>
> Cc: Yvette Subramanian <yvettes at berkeley.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] UC Berkeley CITRIS Research Exchange for the
>    Spring is now online
> Message-ID:
>    <CANhci9GF5bWsNRn7NvG=VPfbeLUwYZvCSwMiurYm9KuiJvNmpA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> If you are in the area, please check out the great seminar series from our
> friends at UC Berkeley.
> 
> For those outside the area, you can always watch the YouTube video after
> the event.
> 
> Best,
> Yosem
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Yvette Subramanian <yvettes at berkeley.edu>
> Date: Tue, Jan 20, 2015 at 9:53 AM
> Subject: CITRIS Research Exchange for the Spring is now online
> 
> The first talk of the CITRIS Research Exchange seminar series will take
> place on Wednesday, January 28. The seminars are held on Wednesdays from
> 12:00-1:00pm in the Banatao Auditorium of Sutardja Dai Hall on the UC
> Berkeley campus, and box lunches are provided at UC Berkeley with
> registration. All talks are posted to our YouTube site after the event:
> https://www.youtube.com/citris.
> 
> http://citris-uc.org/spring-2015-citris-research-exchange-seminar-series/
> 
> Starting this semester, CITRIS is joining with ITS and TRUST to host a new
> seminar series on Resilience: http://citris-uc.org/spring-
> 2015-resilience-seminar-series/
> 
> Registration for each event (by the Monday prior at 3pm) is required to
> ensure lunch at UC Berkeley at http://citris.eventbrite.com/
> 
> --------------------
> CITRIS Research Exchange, Spring 2015
> 
> January 28
> Reza Abbaschian,  UC Riverside
> "Trends in Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) Education"
> 
> February 4
> Emily Jacobi, Digital Democracy
> "Harnessing Technology to Empower Marginalized Communities"
> 
> February 11
> Meredith Fowlie, UC Berkeley
> "Field Experimentation on the Demand Side of Electricity Markets"
> 
> February 18
> Pat Hanrahan, Stanford University
> "Scientific Visualization and Big Data"
> 
> February 25
> Stephen Wheeler,  UC Davis
> "Appropriate Technology for Sustainable Cities"
> 
> March 4
> Kathy Kim, UC Davis
> "Social Networking in Cancer Care"
> 
> March 11
> Michael Cohen, UC Berkeley
> "The Open Town Hall"
> 
> March 18
> Stavros G. Vougioukas, UC Davis
> "Automated Agriculture"
> *242 and 250 Sutardja Dai Hall
> 
> March 25
> No talk, spring break week
> 
> April 1
> David Hochschild, CA Department of Energy
> "Sunrise from the West: The Growth of Renewable Energy in California"
> 
> April 8
> Brad Pollock,  UC Davis
> "Preventing Disease and Shaping Health Policy"
> 
> April 15
> William Nazaroff, UC Berkeley
> "Sustainably Improving Indoor Environmental Quality"
> 
> April 22
> Jay Lund, UC Davis
> "Better Managing California's Droughts with Data, Modeling, and People"
> *This seminar is part of the new Resilience Seminar Series on campus:
> http://citris-uc.org/spring-2015-resilience-seminar-series/*
> 
> April 29
> Reg Kelly, UCSF QB3
> "Innovating Innovatively at UC"
> 
> May 6
> Lise Getoor, UC Santa Cruz
> "Reasoning with Uncertainty"
> -----------
> 
> WEBCAST URL for live viewing during the event.
>    http://video.citris.berkeley.edu/playlists/webcast (Flash format)
> 
> Live webcasting of each CITRIS Research Exchange seminar is available at
> these CITRIS campuses:
> 
> CITRIS at Davis: 1065 Kemper Hall, UC Davis
> CITRIS at Merced: COB 322-Willow (Classroom and Office Building), UC Merced
> CITRIS at Santa Cruz: School of Engineering Building 2, Room 595B, UC Santa
> Cruz
> 
> More information about CITRIS and the Banatao Institute at CITRIS Berkeley can
> be found at http://www.citris-uc.org/. We hope to see you at the talks.
> 
> best, Yvette
> 
> -- 
> - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> yvette subramanian, ph.d. | CITRIS special projects
> 356-C Sutardja Dai Hall, UC Berkeley campus
> (510) 643-4866 | (510) 642-1800 fax | yvette at citris-uc.org
> 
> Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society
> (CITRIS) and the Banatao Institute at CITRIS Berkeley
> http://www.citris-uc.org/
> http://www.facebook.com/citris
> Follow us on Twitter: #citrisnews
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 19
> Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 21:35:56 +0100
> From: Andrea St <andst7 at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] [SPAM:####] [SPAM:###] Davos 2015 takes aim
>    at the future of the internet (and cyber-security)
> Message-ID:
>    <CAJ7-gzZGRrdatt_m9yd7VKT4JBLNirOXi9c6i15fzWOGQiSKVw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Dear list,
> this is my latest comment on Huffington Post about Davos and its panels on
> cyber security. Several panels with Jonathan Zittrain, Kaspersky, Merkel,
> Toomas Hendrik Ilves and Bradford L. Smith.
> 
> Link:
> http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrea-stroppa/davos-2015-takes-aim-at-t_b_6505286.html?utm_hp_ref=davos
> 
> 
> 
> Comments are welcome,
> 
> 
> -- 
> Andrea Stroppa
> 
> http://huffingtonpost.com/andrea-stroppa
> @andst7
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 20
> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 11:36:27 -0600
> From: Steven Clift <clift at e-democracy.org>
> To: newswire <newswire at groups.dowire.org>
> Cc: Tom Steinberg <tom at mysociety.org>, Myf Nixon <myf at mysociety.org>
> Subject: [liberationtech] mySociety's new $3.6M investment from
>    Omidyar Network, seeks to grow Poplus civic tech collaboration
> Message-ID:
>    <CAO9TZ0WQ2uJJhejS2Vdtw2cZz_hbuc1YOSi3dEtiRXnWmAr_cA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> This is very exciting news for the civic technology and open
> government movement.
> 
> You'll note that Tom Steinberg references Poplus in his post below.
> Poplus website: http://bit.ly/poplus
> 
> In my view, Poplus represents the next generation of collaborative and
> shared civic tech development. Think code "components" or Lego
> building blocks you can use to adapt code across borders and different
> political systems.
> 
> If you want to tap into mySociety's very global momentum _combined_
> with other orgs like FCI in Chile, g0v in Taiwan, Sinar in Malaysia,
> SimSim in Morocco, etc. and forward thinking
> coders/companies/governments/etc., I strongly encourage you to join
> the Poplus Google Group:
>     http://bit.ly/poplusgroup
> And join in our fresh round of introductions: http://bit.ly/poplusintros
> 
> E-Democracy is excited to further announce we've been commissioned by
> mySociety to lead an effort to boost global Poplus participation via
> online engagement. So join in!
> 
> Congrats mySociety! Thank you Omidyar Network.
> 
> Steven Clift
> Poplus.org and E-Democracy.org
> 
> P.S. We just had a Poplus Meetup teleconference today with updates
> spanning the global. See the raw notes and listen to the recording:
> http://bit.ly/poplusmeetup  The next virtual Meetup is on Feb. 18:
> http://bit.ly/poplusFeb2015calRSVP  (this will be geared toward people
> *new* to Poplus, definitely join the online group for details:
> http://bit.ly/poplusgroup )
> 
> 
> See:
> http://bit.ly/mysocomidyar
> 
> Omidyar Network backs mySociety
> 
> Posted by Tom Steinberg 21st January 2015
> 
> 
> Much of mySociety?s work is only possible thanks to generous funding
> from a number of philanthropic foundations.
> 
> Today, we are delighted to announce that we have been awarded a major
> strategic investment from Omidyar Network totalling up to $3.6m over
> three years.
> 
> This is the third time we?ve been supported by Omidyar Network, and
> this represents the biggest investment we?ve ever had. Alongside
> organisations like the Open Society Foundation, Google.org and the
> Indigo Trust, Omidyar has been central in our transformation from a
> tiny UK-focused non-profit, to a global social enterprise of nearly 30
> staff.
> 
> Being supported by Omidyar Network means more than just vital
> financial support. It means access to their amazing networks of other
> investees, and advice and guidance from a range of sources. And, also
> crucial for an organisation that seeks technical excellence, it means
> the stamp of support from an organisation that ultimately traces its
> DNA back to the giant internet successes that are eBay and Paypal.
> 
> What is the money for?
> 
> mySociety?s main ambition, over the next three years, is to help a
> couple of dozen other organisations, spread around the world, to grow
> popular citizen empowerment tools that are big enough to really matter
> to the citizens of a wide range of countries. This means building and
> growing tools that help people to check up on politicians, demand
> information and answers, or report and track problems, in hugely
> varying contexts.
> 
> In addition to this, we will continue to maintain and grow the network
> of users of our technology and support the growing Poplus -
> http://bit.ly/poplus - federation.
> 
> It?s a tough goal, and one that will require even more from the
> organisations we partner with, than from our own colleagues. But the
> very fact that we can even try to help groups at this scale, is
> because Omidyar Network enables us to imagine it.
> 
> 
> 
> Steven Clift  -  Executive Director, E-Democracy
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 21
> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 13:14:45 -0800
> From: Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu>
> To: Liberation Technologies <liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Stanford Liberationtech Seminar: Will
>    revolution    be tweeted? - Jan 29
> Message-ID:
>    <CANhci9GGCF3me+FV7oLPifEzYF36KSgTGBbS=b6_=bMUwURfQg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> From: Kathleen Barcos <kbarcos at stanford.edu>
> 
> 
> 
> 
> The Center on Democracy, Development and Rule of Law
> presents
> 
> 
> 
> * The Program on Liberation Technology Seminar Series *
> *Will the Revolution be Tweeted? Information & Communication Technology and
> Conflict *
> 
> *Speaker*
> *Navid Hassanpour,*
> Postdoctoral Research Associate,
> Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance (NCGG)
> 
> 
>  Thursday, January 29, 2015
> 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM
> 
> *S*chool of Education
> Room 128
>  FSI Contact
> Kathleen Barcos
> <http://cddrl.fsi.stanford.edu/libtech/people/kathleen_barcos>
> 
> kbarcos at stanford.edu
> *Abstract*
> 
> Is communication technology conducive to collective violence? Recent
> studies have provided conflicting answers to the same question. While some
> see the introduction of cellular communication as a contributing factor to
> civil conflict in Africa (Pierskalla and Hollenbach APSR 2013), others
> ascribe an opposite effect to mobile communications in Iraq (Shapiro and
> Weidmann IO forthcoming). During the talk, I will further explore the logic
> behind "Why the revolution will not be tweeted", and argue that the answer
> lies in contagion processes of collective action at the periphery, not the
> hierarchical schemes of central coordination as was argued before. To
> provide evidence, I will draw on historical accounts of social revolutions,
> a GIS study of the Syrian Civil War, a convenience survey sample from the
> 2011 Egyptian Revolution, as well as network experiments of collective
> risk-taking in a controlled setting.
> Speaker Bio
> 
> Navid Hassanpour
> <http://wws.princeton.edu/faculty-research/faculty/nh6> (Ph.D.s
> in Political Science from Yale'14, and Electrical Engineering from
> Stanford'06) studies political contestation, in its contentious and
> electoral forms. Following an inquiry into collective and relational
> dimensions of contentious politics, currently he is working on a project
> that examines the history, emergence, and the dynamics of representative
> democracy outside the Western World. This year he is a Niehaus postdoctoral
> fellow at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of public and International
> Affairs. His work has appeared in Political Communication as well as IEEE
> Transactions on Information Theory. His book project, Leading from the
> Periphery, is under consideration at Cambridge University Press' Structural
> Analysis in the Social Sciences Series.
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 22
> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 22:32:17 +0000
> From: "Jiang, Min" <Min.Jiang at uncc.edu>
> To: "liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu"
>    <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] CfP - International Journal of Communication
>    Special Issue - (Un)civil Society in Digital China
> Message-ID:
>    <BAE0D1559DA43940A291AFCC90D9A5110EF7C5EB at RPITSEXMS4.its.uncc.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
> 
> Dear colleagues,
> 
> Please see the following CfP and kindly share it with our colleagues. Apologies for cross-posting. Many thanks!
> 
> Min
> 
> ____________________________________________________________________
> 
> Min Jiang (Ph.D. Purdue), Associate Professor of Communication Studies
> Affiliate Faculty, International Studies
> Co-coordinator, Digital Arts, Sciences & Technologies (DAST) <http://clas-pages.uncc.edu/dast/>
> 5011 Colvard N., UNCC, 9201 University City Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28223
> 704-687-0768 | Min.Jiang at uncc.edu<mailto:Min.Jiang at uncc.edu> | Web<http://clas-pages.uncc.edu/min-jiang/>site<http://clas-pages.uncc.edu/min-jiang/> | Twitter<http://www.twitter.com/mindyjiang> | LinkedIn<http://www.linkedin.com/in/minjiang>
> 
> Research Affiliate
> Center for Global Communication Studies, University of Pennsylvania
> _____________________________________________________________________
> 
> 
> (Un)civil Society in Digital China
> Special Issue for Publication in the International Journal of Communication
> Call for Proposals
> 
> 
> Editors
> 
> Min Jiang (Ph.D.), Associate Professor of Communication Studies, UNC Charlotte, USA
> Ashley Esarey (Ph.D.), Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Alberta, Canada
> 
> 
> Rationale
> 
> Civil society?s role in furthering democratization and the development of a public sphere has long attracted scholars whose work has traced the historical roots of civil society in China and celebrated its emergence offline and online. While decades of economic reforms have empowered myriad civil society organizations, volatile contention has arisen among social groups along ideological, class, ethnic, racial and regional fault lines. Uncivil exchanges, amplified by the Internet and social media, often work at cross purposes and fail to produce consensus or solutions to public problems. These disputes, and the underlying social/political/cultural schisms, threaten to undermine constructive citizen engagement and the promise of civil society in China. They also challenge the notion of a unified civil society standing in solidarity against a monolithic, authoritarian state.
> 
> Consider the following examples:
> 
> o   The Internet flame war between Han Han and Fang Zhouzi that delegitimized the notion of ?public intellectual? in China
> 
> o   Left-Right debate amongst China?s intellectual communities that spill over into street brawls
> 
> o   Vigilantism and breaches of privacy (i.e. instances of ?human flesh search engine? and the Guo Meimei Red Cross scandal)
> 
> o   Online conflicts between ?haves? and ?have-nots? amidst extreme inequality
> 
> o   Virtual contention between Han and ethnic minorities over the status of Tibet and Xinjiang
> 
> o   Racial discourse on mixed-race Chinese and immigrants
> 
> o   Clashes over Taiwan?s ?sunflower movement? expressed on the Internet
> 
> o   Divergent online opinions about the ?umbrella movement? in Hong Kong
> 
> This special issue invites contributors to unpack the multilayered, multidimensional reality and contradictions that define the Chinese Internet, focusing on the big-picture ramifications of online contention. With a population of nearly 650 million, Chinese Internet users are more diverse than the tech-savvy, liberal elites who first went online two decades ago. The groups active online today include politically conservative, nationalistic, apathetic, and even reactionary individuals. They also evince complicated attitudes towards the state, business and other demographic segments. The complex make-up of Chinese civil society and the nature of its self-representation thus challenge, on the one hand, an idealized notion of civil society that is independent from the private sphere, government and business, and on the other, the implicit assumption prevalent in Chinese Internet studies of a liberal subject demanding social justice, media freedom and political reform.
> 
> Questions for contributors:
> 
> o   What are the characteristics of Chinese civil society? What is its potential or limitations? Does the proliferation of the Internet in China necessarily empower civil society in China? Is the opposite possible?
> 
> o   Is civil society always civil? Can it be uncivil, fractious and even reactionary? How does the Chinese Internet amplify or mitigate (un)civil tendencies? To what extent is online public debate or collective action becoming more fragmentary, working at cross purposes, or resulting in ?echo chamber? effects and polarization? Do nationalistic, jingoistic and even reactionary forces overwhelm and dominate ?civil? discourse?
> 
> o   Are the ?uncivil? tendencies of the Chinese Internet inevitable in a society composed of increasingly diverse groups? To what extent do commercial and state institutions influence uncivil tendencies online through intervention or even manipulation? What roles do powerful Internet businesses and elite personalities play?
> 
> o   Under what circumstances might incivility online prove advantageous for political or social change?
> 
> o   What evidence do we have for (un)civil society in China? Examples might include the formation of informal groups and formal organizations, discourses, and their intersection with collective action, social movements, and other social behavior.
> 
> Contributions to this special issue will map a spectrum of key actors, issues, and orientations of a contentious civil society that has been submerged under a larger body of research on China and established democracies that assume state-society confrontation and fail to explore intra-societal tensions. Collectively, the contributions promise to produce a theoretically-interesting and empirically rich body of work that expands and deepens Chinese Internet research dominated by work focused on such topics as Chinese Internet censorship and propaganda, online activism, civic associations, deliberation and online culture. Insights generated from this special issue will in turn inform and advance research on civil society by debating its essence and examining the conditions conducive or unfavorable to its growth, with implications going beyond China. Although contributions will emphasize what polarizes Chinese society and sometimes seem to tear it apart, we welcome contributions that ana
> lyze the prospects for rising above incivility, bridging sociopolitical schisms, and building consensus without compromising self-expression and personal security.
> 
> 
> Affiliated Conference
> 
> We encourage interested contributors to attend the 13th Chinese Internet Research Conference (CIRC) that includes as its theme ?(un)civil society in digital China.? The conference will be held at the University of Alberta, Canada on May 27-28, 2015. The deadline for submitting paper abstracts (400 words) is February 15, 2015. For more information, please visit:
> http://www.china.ualberta.ca/Conferences/Chinese-internet-research-conference.aspx
> 
> 
> Proposed Schedule
> 
> 
> Abstract Deadline                                         Jul 1, 2015
> Notice of Abstract Acceptance                     Aug 1, 2015
> Full Paper Deadline                                      Jan 1, 2016
> 
> Reviews Deadline                                         Mar 1, 2016
> Revisions Deadline                                       May 1, 2016
> Finalized Paper                                             Jul 1, 2016
> 
> 
> 
> Paper Guidelines
> 
> 
> o   Submitted papers will go through double-blind peer review.
> 
> o   The maximum word count is 9,000 words (including the abstract, keywords, images with captions, references, and appendices, if any).
> 
> o   Abstracts submitted for pre-screening should be less than 500 words.
> 
> o   Submitted full papers are not guaranteed acceptance.
> 
> o   Formatting of the special issue follows the general guidelines of the International Journal of Communication (IJoC).
> 
> 
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 23
> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 20:29:02 -0800
> From: Mitar <mmitar at gmail.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Net neutrality case in Slovenia
> Message-ID:
>    <CAKLmikM0CkSHfLHfs=RBsob0Z_TEeEAacH7_Lv24Pkq8g7FxDw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> Hi!
> 
> In Slovenia we have net neutrality law. And our FCC has just made a
> judgement that our ISPs have been breaking it by offering their own
> mobile services like Spotify, DropBox and Netflix clones for free (for
> other services you have to pay for mobile Internet data usage, but
> theirs you could use for free). This is a great example how ISPs can
> misuse their position to have an advantage over other services. This
> is why net neutrality is important.
> 
> http://www.delo.si/znanje/infoteh/akos-razsodil-telekom-slovenije-in-simobil-krsita-nevtralnost-interneta.html
> 
> 
> Mitar
> 
> -- 
> http://mitar.tnode.com/
> https://twitter.com/mitar_m
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 24
> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 09:23:38 +0100
> From: Rejo Zenger <rejo at zenger.nl>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Net neutrality case in Slovenia
> Message-ID: <20150124082338.GH817 at ix.home>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
> 
> ++ 23/01/15 20:29 -0800 - Mitar:
>> In Slovenia we have net neutrality law. And our FCC has just made a
>> judgement that our ISPs have been breaking it by offering their own
>> mobile services like Spotify, DropBox and Netflix clones for free (for
>> other services you have to pay for mobile Internet data usage, but
>> theirs you could use for free). This is a great example how ISPs can
> 
> In other words, your NRA decided the ISP's are violating the NN 
> provisions and forced the ISP's to stop doing so? 
> 
> -- 
> Rejo Zenger
> E rejo at zenger.nl | P +31(0)639642738 | W https://rejo.zenger.nl  
> T @rejozenger | J rejo at zenger.nl
> OpenPGP   1FBF 7B37 6537 68B1 2532  A4CB 0994 0946 21DB EFD4
> XMPP OTR  271A 9186 AFBC 8124 18CF  4BE2 E000 E708 F811 5ACF
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 25
> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 12:47:07 -0600
> From: Francisco Ruiz <ruiz at iit.edu>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Testers sought for PassLok privacy
> Message-ID:
>    <CAAO5WsxLQDGyPoJ981+bS+h6+yYRkD0hUmw66PC5J-12tNU8MA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> PassLok is a comprehensive cryptography and steganography toolkit in the
> form of a web app. Designed for power and ease of use, it sits alongside
> your regular email or any other program to encrypt, decrypt, or hide text
> and files. If the browser is webRTC-compatible, it also does real-time chat
> involving text, files, audio, and even video.
> 
> PassLok combines several open-source libraries to provide auditable
> security. The web app consists of a single html file, which can be saved
> locally and used offline. Hashes are published for each new version along
> with authenticating videos for the SHA256 hash.
> 
> The PassLok code is already two years old and is available from several
> servers, plus the Chrome, Android, and iOS stores, but it is still little
> known. This is why we are asking the Liberation Tech community to take a
> look at it and uncover flaws and propose enhancements. Our goal is to make
> PassLok the safest, strongest, simplest, most useful app we can.
> 
> Many thanks in advance.
> 
> Francisco Ruiz
> 
> 
> Sources:
> 
> Web app:
> https://passlok.com
> 
> https://www.autistici.org/passlok
> 
> https://passlok.site44.com
> 
> https://fruiz500.github.io/passlok
> 
> 
> Github repo:
> https://github.com/fruiz500/passlok
> 
> Chrome:
> https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/passlok-privacy/epcchpdljafmfegifkigklfcmkphfmbh
> 
> Android:
> https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.fruiz500.passlok
> 
> iOS:
> https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/passlok-privacy/id879861603?mt=8&uo=4
> 
> Info website:
> http://passlok.weebly.com
> 
> 
> Current version of PassLok is: 2.1.02
> Made on 1/19/15
> 
> SHA256 for all web sources:
> edc8-a959-c4bf-d20a-3850-d387-2312-646a-df6c-e9d3-03ab-d779-5420-269a-8cfd-f96a
> 
> MD5: 811f-b505-8d84-bcfd-eb7a-04b3-41f1-18b8
> 
> SHA1: 8c55-3ef0-5a7f-6451-8dec-b3db-e205-c820-bfcc-60bc
> 
> See me reading the SHA256 in this video:
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TP-dCu_PiLo
> 
> Thank you once again.
> 
> -- 
> Francisco Ruiz
> Associate Professor
> MMAE department
> Illinois Institute of Technology
> 
> PL21ezLok=1iw+0_y5xyh_66nby_u12x1_hmdw8_iioou_6yhud_a8/i9_jd4fj_fvv6i_swkrn_u773t_jb7yr_+d9nn_/b4h6_880py_vtf4L_o4zwr_6207u_v/bdd=354ad_7836e_52c1a_2cae9=PL21ezLok
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0LtNkM2RSs <https://www.youtube.com>
> 
> get the PassLok privacy app at: https://passlok.com <http://passlok.com>
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 26
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 10:41:36 +0100
> From: Javier de Rivera <javier at socialmediasociology.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Teknokultura Journal - latest issue
> Message-ID: <54C60BD0.9010500 at socialmediasociology.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> Here is the Teknokultura Journal <http://teknokultura.net>lastest issue.
> 
> It opens with an article by Langdon Winner about technology, politics
> and economy: Facing the Plague: Economic and Political Inequality
> <http://teknokultura.net/index.php/tk/article/view/246>
> And also includes several articles on surveillance, such as Big Data,
> Actionable Information, Scientific Knowledge and the Goal of Control
> <http://teknokultura.net/index.php/tk/article/view/239> by Chris Hables
> Gray, and a very interesting review on Bauman, Z. and Lyon, D. (2013).
> Liquid Surveillance. <http://teknokultura.net/index.php/tk/article/view/248>
> 
> I hope it is of you interest, and want to remind you that we are always
> open for new submissions.
> 
> Best regards,
> 
> Javier de Rivera
> @teknokultura <http://twitter.com/teknokultura>
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 27
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 12:53:28 +0000
> From: Christian Fuchs <christian.fuchs at uti.at>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: [liberationtech] Call ESA 2015 Conference: ?Critical Media
>    Sociology Today?
> Message-ID: <54C638C8.3080807 at uti.at>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
> 
> Call: RN18 Panel ?Critical Media Sociology Today?
> 12th Conference of the European Sociological Association
> August 25-28, 2015. Prague
> 
> Abstract Submission Deadline: Feb 1
> Submission: http://esa12thconference.eu/abstract-submission
> 
> Call text: http://fuchs.uti.at/1338/
> 
> Critical Media Sociology Today
> 
> We live in times of ongoing crisis, the extension and intensification of 
> inequalities concerning class, gender, and race, a return of the 
> importance of the economy and political economy, a lack of imaginations 
> of alternatives to neo-liberalism and capitalism, an intensification of 
> right-wing extremism and fascism all over Europe, a lack of visions and 
> power of the political Left, an intensification and extension of 
> extremely repressive forms of state power such as communications 
> surveillance conducted by secret services, ideological scapegoating 
> conducted by conservative and far-right parties, and law and 
> order-politics. Left-wing movements and parties have in some countries 
> emerged or been strengthened, but the crisis has overall brought a 
> further political shift towards the right and an intensification of 
> capitalism and inequality.
> 
> We today require politically a renewal of the Left. For critical media 
> sociology this means that it needs to ask questions, theorise, and 
> conduct critical analysis of media and communications in the context of 
> capitalism, class, ideologies, racism, fascism, right-wing extremism, 
> gender, state power, activism and social movements, challenges for 
> public service, media reforms, crisis, globalisation, the rise of China, 
> digitalisation, consumer and advertising culture, 
> information/cultural/media work, digital labour, the new international 
> division of cultural and digital labour, warfare and military conflicts, 
> the new imperialism, financialisation, etc.
> 
> ESA RN 18 calls for contributions that shed new light on questions that 
> Critical Media Sociology needs to ask today and on theoretical and 
> analytical insights that help to shape Critical Media Sociology in the 
> 21st Century.
> 
> RN18?s panel at the ESA 2014 Prague Conference ?Differences, 
> Inequalities Sociological Imagination? and its contributions are 
> organised in the form of specific session topics.
> 
> ESA RN18 calls for contributions to the following sessions:
> 
> RN18_1: Critical Media Sociology and Karl Marx Today:
> What is the role and legacy of Karl Marx?s works and Marxist theory for 
> critical media sociology today?
> 
> RN18_2: Critical Media Sociology and Capitalism Today:
> How does capitalism shape media and communications today?
> 
> RN18_3: Critical Media Sociology and Critical Theory Today:
> What is a critical theory of 21st century society? What role do 
> communication, media and culture play in such a theory?
> 
> RN18_4: Critical Media Sociology and Stuart Hall Today:
> How do Stuart Hall?s works, projects, and collaborations matter for 
> critical media sociology today?
> 
> RN18_5: Critical Media Sociology and Cultural Materialism Today:
> How does Raymond Williams? approach of cultural materialism matter today 
> for understanding the sociology of media and communications?
> 
> RN18_6: Critical Media Sociology, Patriarchy and Gender Today:
> What is the role of and relationship of identity politics and 
> anti-capitalism for feminist media sociology today?
> 
> RN18_7: Critical Media Sociology and the Critique of the Political 
> Economy of the Internet and Social Media:
> How does capitalism shape the Internet and social media?
> 
> RN18_8: Critical Media Sociology and Ideology Critique Today:
> What are the main forms of ideology today and how do they operate in the 
> media? Which forms and approaches of ideology critique do we need to 
> understand them?
> 
> RN18_9: Critical Media Sociology, Right-Wing Extremism and Fascism Today:
> What is the relationship of far-right movements and parties, the media 
> and communication?
> 
> RN18_10: Critical Media Sociology and Digital Labour Today:
> What forms of digital labour and digital class struggles are there and 
> how can they best be theorised, analysed, and understood?
> 
> RN18_11: Critical Media Sociology and the Left:
> How could a 21st century Left best look like and what is the role of 
> media and communications for such a Left? What is the historical, 
> contemporary, and possible future relationship of critical media 
> sociology to the Left? What is the role of media, communications, the 
> Internet, and social media in left-wing movements? What problems do such 
> movements face in relation to the media, communications, the Internet, 
> and social media?
> 
> RN18_12: Critical Media Sociology and China:
> How can critical media sociology understand the media in China and the 
> role of China and Chinese media in global capitalism? What are 
> differences and commonalities between European and Chinese media 
> understood with the help of critical media sociology?
> 
> RN18_13: Critical Media Sociology, Democracy and the Public Sphere Today:
> How can we best theorise and understand potentials and limits for the 
> mediated public sphere in the 21st century?
> 
> RN18_14: Critical Media Sociology, the Commons, and the Alternatives Today:
> What are the problems and post-capitalist potentials of alternative 
> projects such as cultural and media co-operatives, left-wing and radical 
> media projects, alternative social media, alternative online platforms, 
> alternative media, community media projects, commons-based media, peer 
> production projects, etc.?
> 
> RN18_15: Critical Media Sociology and State Power Today:
> How does the relationship of media, communication and state power?s 
> various forms of regulation, control, repression, violence and 
> surveillance look like?
> 
> RN18_16: Critical Media Sociology, the University and Academia Today:
> What are the challenges and problems for teaching and conducting 
> research about the media and communication from a critical perspective? 
> What can be done to overcome existing limits and problems?
> 
> RN18_17: Critical Media Sociology and Cultural and Communication Labour:
> What are characteristics of cultural and communication labour in 
> capitalism today? Are there potentials that they can transcend 
> precarity? What is the role of alternative economic models such as 
> co-operatives (self-managed companies) in this respect?
> 
> RN18_18: Critical Media Sociology and Political Communication:
> What is the role of political communication for a critical sociology of 
> the media?
> 
> Notes
> Please submit only to one session. Abstracts should not exceed 250 
> words. Each paper session will have the duration of 1.5 hours. Normally 
> sessions will include 4 papers. Abstracts must be submitted online to 
> the submission platform, see below. Abstracts sent by email cannot be 
> accepted. Abstracts will be peer-reviewed and selected for presentation 
> by the Research Network; the letter of notification will be sent by the 
> conference software system in early April 2015.
> http://esa12thconference.eu/abstract-submission
> 
> Conference fee: http://esa12thconference.eu/fee
> 
> ESA/RN18 membership:
> Paying members of ESA and RN18 have strongly reduced conference fees:
> http://www.europeansociology.org/membership.html
> 
> Mailing list, Facebook:
> You can join RN18?s media sociology mailing list 
> http://lists.jacobs-university.de/mailman/listinfo/esa-rn18 and follow 
> RN18 on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/esarn18?ref=ts&fref=ts
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 28
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 21:06:15 +0000
> From: "J.M. Porup" <jm at porup.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] The Future of Security Journalism
> Message-ID: <54C6AC47.40603 at porup.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
> A couple of days ago, Quinn Norton published the following piece:
> 
> 
> We Should All Step Back from Security Journalism
> I?ll Go First
> 
> https://medium.com/message/we-should-all-step-back-from-security-journalism-e474cd67e2fa
> 
> 
> Here's my reply:
> 
> Security Journalism, Full Speed Ahead!
> I?ll Go First
> 
> https://medium.com/@toholdaquill/security-journalism-full-speed-ahead-34e490742056
> 
> JMP
> 
> --
> J.M. Porup
> www.JMPorup.com
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 29
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 21:22:56 +0000
> From: Eleanor Saitta <ella at dymaxion.org>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The Future of Security Journalism
> Message-ID: <54C6B030.6050001 at dymaxion.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
>> On 2015.01.26 21.06, J.M. Porup wrote:
>> Here's my reply:
>> 
>> Security Journalism, Full Speed Ahead! I?ll Go First
>> 
>> https://medium.com/@toholdaquill/security-journalism-full-speed-ahead-34e490742056
> 
> What a shocking failure at understanding what she wrote.
> 
> E.
> 
> -- 
> Ideas are my favorite toys.
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 30
> Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 22:11:54 +0000
> From: "J.M. Porup" <jm at porup.com>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] The Future of Security Journalism
> Message-ID: <54C6BBAA.50607 at porup.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
> Eleanor Saitta:
>> On 2015.01.26 21.06, J.M. Porup wrote:
>>> Here's my reply:
>>> 
>>> Security Journalism, Full Speed Ahead! I?ll Go First
>>> 
>>> https://medium.com/@toholdaquill/security-journalism-full-speed-ahead-34e490742056
>> 
>> What a shocking failure at understanding what she wrote.
> 
> I am happy to take criticism, but perhaps you could be more specific?
> 
> JMP
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 31
> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 11:58:57 -0500
> From: Nick Martin <nick at techchange.org>
> To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu
> Subject: [liberationtech] Free TechChange-USAID Course: How To Use
>    Mobile Data Solutions for Better Development Outcomes
> Message-ID:
>    <CAB8bGP6vZjOteiMGuM3sSSOE7JabtSpWLaywTSgi9u66G3daYA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Hi Liberation Tech Folks,
> 
> Check out the new two hour online course we just finished with USAID and
> FHI360 on mobile data solutions
> <http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/>. Read more below and
> start learning today.
> 
> Cheers,
> Nick
> 
> ***
> [image: usaid-mobile-data-course]
> <http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/>
> 
> Leading global development organizations are just beginning to utilize
> mobile technologies to improve the efficiency and quality of the data they
> collect, manage, analyze, and share. However, there is so much more the
> international development community could be doing with this powerful
> technology to make better decisions and meet broader global development
> goals.
> 
> Thankfully, you can now learn the secrets of how to use mobile technologies
> to more effectively collect and disseminate data and achieve better
> development outcomes through a free interactive online course on Mobile
> Data Solutions <http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/>.
> 
> This two-hour self-paced online course developed by the Digital Development
> team <http://www.usaid.gov/digital-development> at USAID, the mSTAR Program
> <https://twitter.com/mstar_project> at FHI 360, and TechChange
> <http://techchange.org/>, explores these opportunities and offers a
> comprehensive introduction to key terms, concepts, technologies, and
> strategies, including:
> 
>   - How to assess a mobile data collection project and required resources
>   - How to design a project to achieve the maximum impact possible
>   - How to implement a project to take advantage of appropriate
>   technologies
>   - How to visualize and share the collected data with relevant communities
> 
> Sign up now <http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/> for this
> fun and practical learning environment with a mixture of animations, video
> interviews, scenario-based case studies, and interactive exercises
> including designing and undertaking a survey using mobile tools.
> 
> It is free, and accessible from anywhere with an internet connection and
> anytime no matter your time zone.
> 
> [image: concerns] <http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/>
> 
> -- 
> Nick Martin
> Founder & President
> TechChange
> 240-505-2324
> @ncmart <https://twitter.com/ncmart>
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 32
> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:23:38 +0000
> From: Christian Fuchs <christian.fuchs at uti.at>
> To: "liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu >> liberationtech"
>    <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Marisol Sandoval: From Corporate to Social
>    Media (CAMRI Seminar Feb 4)
> Message-ID: <54C7D7AA.6010901 at uti.at>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
> 
> CAMRI Seminar
> Marisol Sandoval
> From Corporate to Social Media: Critical Perspectives on Corporate 
> Social Responsibility in Media and Communication Industries
> Univ of Westminster
> Wed, Feb 4, 2015
> 14:00
> Harrow Campus, room A7.1
> 
> Launch of the paperback edition of the corresponding book
> 
> Registration per e-mail to christian.fuchs at uti.at
> 
> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/marisol-sandoval-from-corporate-to-social-media-critical-perspectives-on-corporate-social-responsibility-in-media-and-communication-industries
> 
> In this talk, Marisol Sandoval presents her recent book ?From Corporate 
> to Social Media: Critical Perspectives on Corporate Social 
> Responsibility in Media and Communication Industries?, Routledge 2014, 
> http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415722568/
> 
> The corporate and the social are crucial themes of our times. In the 
> first decade of the twenty-first century, both individual lives and 
> society were shaped by capitalist crisis and the rise of social media. 
> But what marks the distinctively social character of "social media"? And 
> how does it relate to the wider social and economic context of 
> contemporary capitalism? The concept of Corporate Social Responsibility 
> (CSR) is based on the idea that a socially responsible capitalism is 
> possible; this suggests that capitalist media corporations can not only 
> enable social interaction and cooperation but also be socially responsible.?
> 
> This presentation provides a critical and provocative perspective on 
> Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in media and communication 
> industries. It examines both the academic discourse on CSR and actual 
> corporate practices in the media sector, offering a double critique that 
> reveals contradictions between corporate interests and social 
> responsibilities. Marisol Sandoval?s political economic analysis of 
> Apple, AT&T, Google, HP, Microsoft, News Corp, The Walt Disney Company 
> and Vivendi shows that media and communication in the twenty-first 
> century are confronted with fundamental social responsibility challenges.
> 
> ?From software patents and intellectual property rights to privacy on 
> the Internet, from working conditions in electronics manufacturing to 
> hidden flows of eWaste ? Marisol Sandoval?s book encourages the reader 
> to explore the multifaceted social (ir)responsibilities that shape 
> commercial media landscapes today. It makes a compelling argument for 
> thinking beyond the corporate in order to envision and bring about truly 
> social media.
> 
> Marisol Sandoval is a lecturer at City University London?s Department of 
> Culture and Creative Industries. Her research critically deals with 
> questions of power, responsibility, commodification, exploitation, 
> ideology and resistance in the global culture industries. She is 
> co-editor of the collected volumes Internet and Surveillance (2012, 
> http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415633642/), Critique, Social 
> Media and the Information Society (2013, 
> http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415841856/), and of the 
> tripleC-special issue ?Philosophers of the World Unite! Theorising 
> Digital Labour and Virtual Work - Definitions, Dimensions and Forms? 
> (http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/issue/view/29). She is 
> co-editor of the open access online journal tripleC: Communication, 
> Capitalism & Critique (http://www.triple-c.at). Her book From Corporate 
> to Social Media? (Routledge, 2014, 
> http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415722568/) looks beyond 
> common understandings of the term social media by providing a critical 
> analysis of corporate social (ir)responsibility in the global media and 
> communication industries.
> 
> Forthcoming talk (open for registration):
> 
> Feb 11: Justin Lewis - Beyond Consumer Capitalism: A Movie Screening and 
> Q&A with Justin Lewis
> 
> http://www.westminster.ac.uk/camri/research-seminars/justin-lewis-beyond-consumer-capitalism-a-movie-screening-and-q-and-a-with-justin-lewis 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 33
> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:34:13 -0600
> From: Steven Clift <clift at e-democracy.org>
> To: newswire <newswire at groups.dowire.org>, "E-Democracy. Org Projects
>    Group" <projects at forums.e-democracy.org>, liberationtech
>    <liberationtech at mailman.stanford.edu>, OGP Civil Society group
>    <ogp at dgroups.org>, poplus <poplus at googlegroups.com>, brigade
>    <brigade at codeforamerica.org>
> Subject: [liberationtech] Open Data Day Micro Grants - ODD is Feb 21st
> Message-ID:
>    <CAO9TZ0W_-PuQ-fagp=DSc=2nPKK0yQN4GCAa1mWi0HD2DSk=zw at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> OPEN DATA DAY 2015 is coming and a coalition of partners have come
> together to provide a limited number of micro-grants designed to
> support communities organise ODD activities all over the world !
> 
> All the details from the Open Knowledge Foundation:
> 
>     http://bit.ly/opendatadaymicrogrants
> 
> 
> More ...
> 
> Here are the emerging events:
> 
>    http://wiki.opendataday.org/Main_Page
> 
> If you want to get involved, join their online group:
> 
>     https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/open-data-day
> 
> Also note Code Across events as well:
> 
>      http://www.codeforamerica.org/events/codeacross-2015/
> 
> You need to check with wiki, map and the Code Across list to see what
> is emerging this is as OKF puts it "As a volunteer led event, with no
> organisation behind it, Open Data Day provides the perfect opportunity
> for communities all over the world to convene, celebrate and promote
> open data in ways most relevant to their fellow citizens."
> 
> See the 2014 sheet for events from last year too - starting one in
> your city with other who did this before is worth at try:
> 
>      https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Ruewy74XVCCyp89YzqsyeoKTjLmyzNHo0hrjr3djiyQ/edit?usp=sharing
> 
> Lastly, as part of the Coalition supporting this effort with some
> in-kind promotion, note our tips on digital outreach for unconferences
> and hackathons. If set up an event, these very tactical tips will help
> to get people in the room!
> 
>     http://e-democracy.org/digout
> 
> Steven Clift  -  Executive Director, E-Democracy
> 
> * Support E-Democracy. Pledge drive to raise $10,000 US:
>      http://e-democracy.org/donate?ft  - Only $890 to 2015 Goal
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 34
> Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:28:51 -0500
> From: Collin Anderson <collin at averysmallbird.com>
> To: liberationtech <liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu>
> Subject: Re: [liberationtech] Iranian are bypass the Twitter
>    censorship and sanction by their mobile phones
> Message-ID:
>    <CAC+VsLv_tqRZzoZBxkY-jKSjHCmNCiRLQMrSg6sPdyXp-esJ2Q at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Support for Iran, Cuba and a number of other countries has been added to
> Twitter: http://mashable.com/2015/01/27/twitter-iran-cuba/
> 
> On Sun, Nov 23, 2014 at 4:18 PM, Nariman Gharib <nariman.gh at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> 
>> Hi John,
>> 
>> On Sun, Nov 23, 2014 at 8:41 PM, John Adams <jna at retina.net> wrote:
>> 
>>> This series of posts conflicts about three different problems. It's
>>> hard to tell what you're having an issue with: Government censorship,
>>> lack of SMS, or 2-factor in the places.
>>> 
>>> From what I know:
>>> 
>>> 1. If any censorship of Twitter is going on, it's Iran, and not
>>> Twitter that is censoring the communications. If the telcos are
>>> blocking messages from Twitter's SMS source, it's the telcos.
>>> 
>>> 2. It's possible Twitter doesn't have a business relationship with any
>>> SMS carriers in the country, so that can break phone verification. You
>>> can still download the client on ios or android and use the code
>>> generation in the client to verify a device, if Twitter is reachable
>>> across the Internet from Iran.
>> 
>> ?Google does? Facebook does? you can't activate your 2step verification
>> via app without adding your phone number in Twitter as far as I know.?
>> 
>> 
>>> 
>>> 3. Who blocked this "Trick" of modifying the page with +98? The page
>>> is completely in SSL, so if that change isn't working anymore then
>>> most likely,  Twitter modified the page.
>>> 
>> 
>> ?Twitter did that.?
>> 
>> 
>>> 
>>> 4. "I wonder if there's a way to get Twitter to remove the restriction
>>> for users based in Iran." --  This is a problem that the Iranian
>>> government needs to solve, not Twitter.
>>> 
>> ?Yes you are right. But 'I think' Twitter have a concern about activists
>> and high profile internet users in Iran, because the verification code
>> comes from a text message to the phone number, it's easy for the Government
>> or IRGC to find those Twitter accounts owners.
>> 
>>> 
>>> It's easier to figure out how to fix these things when you're clear in
>>> the way that you express the problem.
>>> 
>> ?You are right and I'm sorry.?
>> 
>> 
>>> 
>>> -j
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Sun, Nov 23, 2014 at 9:44 AM, Griffin Boyce <griffin at cryptolab.net>
>>> wrote:
>>>>  I wonder if Twitter restricts accounts to one per phone number. Phone
>>>> verification is readily bypassed with something like twilio, but only
>>> the
>>>> *most* advanced users would be able to pull this off.  It would be worth
>>>> setting up an app to allow Iranian users to bypass it
>>> semi-automatically,
>>>> but spambots and abusers would *decimate* it.
>>>> 
>>>>  I wonder if there's a way to get Twitter to remove the restriction for
>>>> users based in Iran. There's not really a good reason for it in the
>>> first
>>>> place =/
>>>> 
>>>> ~Griffin
>>>> 
>>>> Nariman Gharib wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> no it doesn't. they blocked this 'trick' and also many Iranian users
>>>>> can't register to Twitter anymore because it require phone
>>>>> verification on sign-up page.
>>>>> 
>>>>> On Sun, Nov 23, 2014 at 5:11 PM, Kate Krauss <katie at critpath.org>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>>> Does this still work?
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Katie
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Thu, Aug 7, 2014 at 5:34 PM, Nariman Gharib
>>>>>> <nariman.gh at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>>> Basically as you knew Iran is not on the country list of Twitter.
>>>>>>> I've reached to Twitter and they know about this issue.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Iranians are gets very active on Twitter after 2009 Pres.Election
>>>>>>> till now and the numbers of the users all of the time are growing.
>>>>>>> It's sad we see Twitter hasn't Iran on the list while Google and
>>>>>>> other networks are supporting Iran's telephone numbers for give
>>>>>>> the users the option to enable the 2step verification.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> so today I wrote an article on my blog and teach iranians how they
>>>>>>> can active their twitter telephone number(SMS service and active
>>>>>>> their 2step verification) from inside iran.
>>>>>>> https://twitter.com/ListenToUs/status/497374522426015744 [1]
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> how: actually when you are going to submit a number of twitter
>>>>>>> website, with Inspect element on chrome you can add +98 on the
>>>>>>> form and write your in the telephone number field and twitter will
>>>>>>> send you a text message and everything is going to successful.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> and many iranians are now have twitter verification on their
>>>>>>> phones and some of them like this man:
>>>>>>> https://twitter.com/ziarlarimi/status/497484191613726720 [2]
>>>>>>> texting from IRAN without using any circumvention tools.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> I hope twitter will decide to add Iran to the 'INTERFACE' of the
>>>>>>> website,because on the backend everything is fine.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Thanks
>>>>>>> Nariman
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> --
>>>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google.
>>> Violations of
>>>> list guidelines will get you moderated:
>>>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.
>>> Unsubscribe,
>>>> change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at
>>>> companys at stanford.edu.
>>> --
>>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
>>> of list guidelines will get you moderated:
>>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.
>>> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at
>>> companys at stanford.edu.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> PGP: 0xa53963936999cbb6
>> 
>> --
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
>> of list guidelines will get you moderated:
>> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.
>> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at
>> companys at stanford.edu.
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> *Collin David Anderson*
> averysmallbird.com | @cda | Washington, D.C.
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> 
> Subject: Digest Footer
> 
> -- 
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
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