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[liberationtech] January 2016 EQPAM Issue Announcement

Camelia Voinea camelia_voinea at yahoo.com
Mon Feb 1 02:21:29 PST 2016


New Issue! -- European Quarterly of Political Attitudes and Mentalities (EQPAM) Volume 5 Issue No.1 (January 2016)
Table of Contents:Camelia Florela Voinea, "Computational and Simulation Modeling of Political Attitudes: The 'Tiger' Area of Political Culture Research",  pp. 1-21     

Jurica Ševa, Bogdan Okreša Đurić and Markus Schatten
"Visualizing Public Opinion in Croatia Based on Available Social Network Content",  pp. 22-35  
EQPAM website at: European Quarterly of Political Attitudes and Mentalities 
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| European Quarterly of Political Attitudes and Mentalitie...Online Peer-Review Journal of Research in Political Analysis, Modeling and Simulation |
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| View on sites.google.com | Preview by Yahoo |
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 ===================================Camelia Florela Voinea, Ph.D.  Associate Professor  Political Sciences, International Relations and Security Studies Department  Political Science Faculty  University of Bucharest, Romania  Office Address: #8, Spiru Haret Street, Bucharest 010175  E-mail(s): camelia.voinea at fspub.unibuc.ro , camelia_voinea at yahoo.com  Home Page: https://sites.google.com/a/fspub.unibuc.ro/conf-univ-dr-camelia-florela-voinea/  You can access my papers on SSRN at: http://ssrn.com/author=2103805
 

      From: "liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu" <liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu>
 To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu 
 Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 2:59 AM
 Subject: liberationtech Digest, Vol 257, Issue 2
   
----- Forwarded Message -----

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Today's Topics:

  1. BitNation, blockchain id, new year, Fwd: 2015 In Focus:
      Partners, Products, and Potential (Jim Whitescarver)
  2. Stanford course: Surveillance Law (Yosem Companys)
  3. Re: Stanford course: Surveillance Law (James S. Tyre)
  4. DISREGARD - Re: Stanford course: Surveillance Law (Yosem Companys)
  5. Re: DISREGARD - Re: Stanford course: Surveillance    Law
      (Peter Lindener)
  6. Email provider enabling enforced SMTP/TLS for inbound
      MX-received emails (Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists)
  7. Resilient Democracy project (Lorelei Kelly)
  8. Surveillance Law Course (Yosem Companys)
  9. Re: Surveillance Law Course (Andr?s Pacheco)
  10. Re: Surveillance Law Course (Griffin Boyce)
  11. Re: Surveillance Law Course (Andr?s Pacheco)
  12. Mobile Health International Projects Team (Yosem Companys)
  13. Project for non-profit on tracking corporate abuse
      (Yosem Companys)
  14. 2-unit Human Rights course at Stanford (Yosem Companys)
  15. Re: Surveillance Law Course (Cooper Quintin)
  16. Re: Surveillance Law Course (Cooper Quintin)
  17. Build Bitcoin-powered Apps in CS251P! (Yosem Companys)
  18. Faith Isolation (Eric Smiley)
  19. Re: Surveillance Law Course (Andr?s Pacheco)
  20. Nominations for IGF 2016 MAG (Yosem Companys)
  21. Re: Resilient Democracy project (Yosem Companys)
  22. Hackademia Summer School: Empirical Studies in    Computing
      Cultures (Yosem Companys)
  23. Reminder: CFP for Social Justice, Design,    and HCI Workshop
      (CHI '16) (Mariam Asad)
  24. Stanford will pay you to do good in the world! (Yosem Companys)
  25. Still more adventures in knowledge sharing at    nonprofit
      organizations! (Deborah Elizabeth Finn)
  26. 2016 Summer Internship Program, Berkman Center for Internet &
      Society, Application Deadline Feb. 12 (Yosem Companys)
The recent work of BitNation.co is impressive.  I think we all should collaborate with them.  Joining makes a statement supporting voluntary governance.
Freetrist.org is seeking collaborators on a grant on blockchain identity R&D, Please email info at freetrust.org if you are working in this area.
Happy new year all!  Together we will change the world.
Best,
Jim---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: BITNATION <info at bitnation.co>
Date: Thu, Dec 31, 2015 at 3:59 AM
Subject: 2015 In Focus: Partners, Products, and Potential
To: jimscarver at gmail.com


   
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|  A summary of all the amazing things we've done this year, and a look at what we'll be up to in 2016.  |

 
|  View this email in your browser  |

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Partnerships

BITNATION has announced three major partnerships in the last two months alone in what has been the culmination of a year of hard work, close collaboration and - on the whole - glorious success. This brings our number of key partners to 5: Estonia, Horizon, Blocknet, Swarm, and Exosphere. We have built a distributed, talented, highly motivated team from every continent on Earth bar Antarctica. These amazing individuals have demonstrated what can be done with a little self-determination, elbow grease, and a united sense of disillusionment with nation states juxtaposed with the kind of optimism blockchain technologies (and distributed consensus protocols more generally) have brought to this wide and wonderful world. However, our biggest thanks go to you, our interested, interesting netizens. Without your support, engagement and input, none of this would have been possible. We hope you stick around for the ride; 2016 is going to be epic!  |

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|  BITNATION In The Media  |

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|  We would like, in particular, to draw your attention to The Atlantic's must-reads in science and technology, to a beautiful Spanish blog-piece about the extinction of democracy in Europe, and an amazing (and entirely unsurprising) summation of the state of blockchains by none other than payments giant, Visa. Put together, these show that we are gaining traction, that the world needs desperately the innovative governance structures we're experimenting with, and that the blockchain trust machine we rely on is about to come into its own.  |

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Products
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|  You must have heard of our partnership with Estonia's e-Residency program by now. It's been literally everywhere, from Bloomberg, to the WSJ and CNN. We are making waves in the statist world, and recognition by a legacy nation state as a formal partner capable of offering services normally reserved for governments is a really big deal. One small step for BITNATION, one giant leap for virtual sovereignity.

Anyone, anywhere can use our notary which is - for now - free of charge. While the partnership with Estonia strengthens our position as a nation, it has little effect on the actual legality and acceptability of our notary system. It stands on its own two feet: a timestamped proof of existence in an immutable and public ledger and a secure digital signature algorithm. We don't know of a more better notary service anywhere. Joey Krug recently used it and this is what he had to say: 
​
"At Augur we own some short term bills through a brokerage in the UK and had to submit a notarized copy of our founding docs (we're an Estonian entity) and I did it through BITNATION's notary service (and it was accepted). I honestly didn't think it would be accepted, but it was, and is way way way easier than actually meeting a notary in person."  |

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|  Use Our Notary Now  |

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|  As a special New Years' treat, please take a moment to get yourself a World Citizenship ID. The ID generates a key pair that you can use in the notary system (for added security and proof of identity) and will be further integrated with some of the more exciting and intelligent pieces of our Pangea platform.

We are also in the process of putting together a worldwide network of embassies and consulates. If you would like to be a part of this historic expansion into the meatspace and are willing to provide a place for fellow netizens to work or stay, please sign up here. The more the merrier!  |

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|  Become a World Citizen Today  |

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|  Register an Embassy  |

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|  We recently announced that we are teaming up with Exosphere and the Hydra3 bootcamp in Chile to offer a scholarship (amounting to a whopping $1500) for anyone interested in doing an 8-week intensive startup course aimed at producing something to further the goal of decentralized governance. It's not too late to apply, so perhaps you should consider a new years' resolution that includes heading for South America and another rabbit hole filled with awesome people and mind-blowing ideas.  |

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|  Apply Now  |

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|  Our partnership with Swarm has been focused on producing a working liquid holocracy that can be widely and effectively adopted by communities like ours across the globe. It is premised on an holonic contract we are in the process of putting together as we speak. Please join the conversation!  |

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|  Contribute Now  |

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Potential: Pangea

Our biggest focus in the new year will be building out the Pangea platform, which is the flagship of our nation. It's where we will conduct dispute resolution; create, manage, join, and network with the various holons in our community; and generally get on with being a truly decentralized, voluntary, and peaceful nation which exists immutably in the ether. We want to make sure that we deliver a great product, so it may take some time, but it will be worth every extra minute to ensure that it is resilient, effective, and accessible to all who care (or dare) to join the fun. We leave you with two diagrams that reveal both the grand scope of our vision and how much we are in need of some designers to help Susanne out ;) May it be a blessed, peaceful, and loving time ahead!  |

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|  While most of the work of the BITNATION Refugee Emergency Response was done in the initial months of the crisis, we are always looking for the kind of people who are willing to help maintain and improve the quality and reach of this much-needed system. Remember, #BlockchainsNotBorders!  |

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|  You are receiving this email because you registered on the BITNATION website or subscribed to be kept up to date with ongoing progress.

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From: Richard Forno <rforno at infowarrior.org>


FYI, my Stanford CIS colleague (a securitylegalgeek rockstar) is offering a 6-week online course on surveillance law.  Well worth checking out, if you're able and/or interested!   -- rick

Surveillance Law

Learn how police and intelligence agencies can access your data, and how the law (might) protect you! Hackers, attorneys, and concerned citizens are all welcome.

6 weeks of study
1-3 hours/week
English
Jonathan Mayer / Stanford University

It’s easy to be cynical about government surveillance. In recent years, a parade of Orwellian disclosures have been making headlines. The FBI, for example, is hacking into computers that run anonymizing software. The NSA is vacuuming up domestic phone records. Even local police departments are getting in on the act, tracking cellphone location history and intercepting signals in realtime.

Perhaps 2014 is not quite 1984, though. This course explores how American law facilitates electronic surveillance—but also substantially constrains it. You will learn the legal procedures that police and intelligence agencies have at their disposal, as well as the security and privacy safeguards built into those procedures. The material also provides brief, not-too-geeky technical explanations of some common surveillance methods.

Course Syllabus

I. Introduction
We will begin with a brief overview of how surveillance fits into the American legal system. We will also discuss how surveillance issues can be litigated. 

II. The Basics of Surveillance Law
Next, we will review established police surveillance procedures. Using telephone technology as a simple starting point, we will work through various sorts of data that investigators might seek to access—and the constitutional and statutory safeguards on that data.

III. Applying Surveillance Law to Information Technology
Having learned the basics, we will turn to more modern technologies. We will discuss snooping on email, web browsing, and mobile phone location, as well as hacking into devices.

IV. Compelled Assistance to Law Enforcement
What happens when data is technically protected? In this section, we will talk about the government’s (limited) ability to mandate backdoors and to require decryption.

V. The Structure of Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Law
The law that applies to foreign intelligence activities runs parallel to the law that applies to police activities. We will compare the two systems of law and review key distinctions. The section places particular emphasis on Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act, and Executive Order 12333.

VI. Controversial NSA Programs
In the final section, we will review the conduct and legality of controversial National Security Agency programs. We will discuss in detail the domestic phone metadata program, PRISM, and “upstream” Internet monitoring.

 < - >

https://www.coursera.org/course/surveillance

--
It's better to burn out than fade away.
This was January 2015, not forthcoming.

--
James S. Tyre
Law Offices of James S. Tyre
10736 Jefferson Blvd., #512
Culver City, CA 90230-4969
310-839-4114/310-839-4602(fax)
jstyre at jstyre.com
Special Counsel, Electronic Frontier Foundation
https://www.eff.org/

From: liberationtech [mailto:liberationtech-bounces at lists.stanford.edu] On Behalf Of Yosem Companys
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2016 12:17 PM
To: Liberation Technologies
Cc: Richard Forno
Subject: [liberationtech] Stanford course: Surveillance Law

From: Richard Forno <rforno at infowarrior.org>
FYI, my Stanford CIS colleague (a securitylegalgeek rockstar) is offering a 6-week online course on surveillance law.  Well worth checking out, if you're able and/or interested!  -- rick

Surveillance Law

Learn how police and intelligence agencies can access your data, and how the law (might) protect you! Hackers, attorneys, and concerned citizens are all welcome.

6 weeks of study
1-3 hours/week
English
Jonathan Mayer / Stanford University

It’s easy to be cynical about government surveillance. In recent years, a parade of Orwellian disclosures have been making headlines. The FBI, for example, is hacking into computers that run anonymizing software. The NSA is vacuuming up domestic phone records. Even local police departments are getting in on the act, tracking cellphone location history and intercepting signals in realtime.

Perhaps 2014 is not quite 1984, though. This course explores how American law facilitates electronic surveillance—but also substantially constrains it. You will learn the legal procedures that police and intelligence agencies have at their disposal, as well as the security and privacy safeguards built into those procedures. The material also provides brief, not-too-geeky technical explanations of some common surveillance methods.

Course Syllabus

I. Introduction
We will begin with a brief overview of how surveillance fits into the American legal system. We will also discuss how surveillance issues can be litigated. 

II. The Basics of Surveillance Law
Next, we will review established police surveillance procedures. Using telephone technology as a simple starting point, we will work through various sorts of data that investigators might seek to access—and the constitutional and statutory safeguards on that data.

III. Applying Surveillance Law to Information Technology
Having learned the basics, we will turn to more modern technologies. We will discuss snooping on email, web browsing, and mobile phone location, as well as hacking into devices.

IV. Compelled Assistance to Law Enforcement
What happens when data is technically protected? In this section, we will talk about the government’s (limited) ability to mandate backdoors and to require decryption.

V. The Structure of Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Law
The law that applies to foreign intelligence activities runs parallel to the law that applies to police activities. We will compare the two systems of law and review key distinctions. The section places particular emphasis on Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act, and Executive Order 12333.

VI. Controversial NSA Programs
In the final section, we will review the conduct and legality of controversial National Security Agency programs. We will discuss in detail the domestic phone metadata program, PRISM, and “upstream” Internet monitoring.

< - >

https://www.coursera.org/course/surveillance

--
It's better to burn out than fade away.


From: Richard Forno <rforno at infowarrior.org>

Ooops, my error.  This was for LAST year.  I saw "January" and thought it was for 2016.   Please pardon the confusion!

--
It's better to burn out than fade away.

> On Jan 2, 2016, at 12:58 PM, Richard Forno <rforno at infowarrior.org> wrote:
>
> FYI, my Stanford CIS colleague (a securitylegalgeek rockstar) is offering a 6-week online course on surveillance law.  Well worth checking out, if you're able and/or interested!   -- rick
>
> Surveillance Law
>
> Learn how police and intelligence agencies can access your data, and how the law (might) protect you! Hackers, attorneys, and concerned citizens are all welcome.
>
> 6 weeks of study
> 1-3 hours/week
> English
> Jonathan Mayer / Stanford University
>
> It’s easy to be cynical about government surveillance. In recent years, a parade of Orwellian disclosures have been making headlines. The FBI, for example, is hacking into computers that run anonymizing software. The NSA is vacuuming up domestic phone records. Even local police departments are getting in on the act, tracking cellphone location history and intercepting signals in realtime.
>
> Perhaps 2014 is not quite 1984, though. This course explores how American law facilitates electronic surveillance—but also substantially constrains it. You will learn the legal procedures that police and intelligence agencies have at their disposal, as well as the security and privacy safeguards built into those procedures. The material also provides brief, not-too-geeky technical explanations of some common surveillance methods.
>
> Course Syllabus
>
> I. Introduction
> We will begin with a brief overview of how surveillance fits into the American legal system. We will also discuss how surveillance issues can be litigated.
>
> II. The Basics of Surveillance Law
> Next, we will review established police surveillance procedures. Using telephone technology as a simple starting point, we will work through various sorts of data that investigators might seek to access—and the constitutional and statutory safeguards on that data.
>
> III. Applying Surveillance Law to Information Technology
> Having learned the basics, we will turn to more modern technologies. We will discuss snooping on email, web browsing, and mobile phone location, as well as hacking into devices.
>
> IV. Compelled Assistance to Law Enforcement
> What happens when data is technically protected? In this section, we will talk about the government’s (limited) ability to mandate backdoors and to require decryption.
>
> V. The Structure of Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Law
> The law that applies to foreign intelligence activities runs parallel to the law that applies to police activities. We will compare the two systems of law and review key distinctions. The section places particular emphasis on Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act, and Executive Order 12333.
>
> VI. Controversial NSA Programs
> In the final section, we will review the conduct and legality of controversial National Security Agency programs. We will discuss in detail the domestic phone metadata program, PRISM, and “upstream” Internet monitoring.
>
> < - >
>
> https://www.coursera.org/course/surveillance
>
> --
> It's better to burn out than fade away.
DISREGARD - Re: Stanford course: Surveillance Law

To explain more fully:    During the past year we have been re-programmed to pretend that Surveillance Law in no longer of any real concern... 
That is:...     ..Now that so many are drawing pay checks in some way related to our emerging surveillance industry..   the study of Surveillance Law...is in essence mostly for appearance, if necessary at all...   i.e,  lets just repeat history..after all with the Stasi, KGB, and Our very own J. Edgar Hoover there is a great deal of knowledge from our past as to how these kind of things can be done.
... These are not the droids you are looking for!
   -Peter 
On Sat, Jan 2, 2016 at 1:13 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:

From: Richard Forno <rforno at infowarrior.org>

Ooops, my error.  This was for LAST year.  I saw "January" and thought it was for 2016.   Please pardon the confusion!

--
It's better to burn out than fade away.

> On Jan 2, 2016, at 12:58 PM, Richard Forno <rforno at infowarrior.org> wrote:
>
> FYI, my Stanford CIS colleague (a securitylegalgeek rockstar) is offering a 6-week online course on surveillance law.  Well worth checking out, if you're able and/or interested!   -- rick
>
> Surveillance Law
>
> Learn how police and intelligence agencies can access your data, and how the law (might) protect you! Hackers, attorneys, and concerned citizens are all welcome.
>
> 6 weeks of study
> 1-3 hours/week
> English
> Jonathan Mayer / Stanford University
>
> It’s easy to be cynical about government surveillance. In recent years, a parade of Orwellian disclosures have been making headlines. The FBI, for example, is hacking into computers that run anonymizing software. The NSA is vacuuming up domestic phone records. Even local police departments are getting in on the act, tracking cellphone location history and intercepting signals in realtime.
>
> Perhaps 2014 is not quite 1984, though. This course explores how American law facilitates electronic surveillance—but also substantially constrains it. You will learn the legal procedures that police and intelligence agencies have at their disposal, as well as the security and privacy safeguards built into those procedures. The material also provides brief, not-too-geeky technical explanations of some common surveillance methods.
>
> Course Syllabus
>
> I. Introduction
> We will begin with a brief overview of how surveillance fits into the American legal system. We will also discuss how surveillance issues can be litigated.
>
> II. The Basics of Surveillance Law
> Next, we will review established police surveillance procedures. Using telephone technology as a simple starting point, we will work through various sorts of data that investigators might seek to access—and the constitutional and statutory safeguards on that data.
>
> III. Applying Surveillance Law to Information Technology
> Having learned the basics, we will turn to more modern technologies. We will discuss snooping on email, web browsing, and mobile phone location, as well as hacking into devices.
>
> IV. Compelled Assistance to Law Enforcement
> What happens when data is technically protected? In this section, we will talk about the government’s (limited) ability to mandate backdoors and to require decryption.
>
> V. The Structure of Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Law
> The law that applies to foreign intelligence activities runs parallel to the law that applies to police activities. We will compare the two systems of law and review key distinctions. The section places particular emphasis on Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act, and Executive Order 12333.
>
> VI. Controversial NSA Programs
> In the final section, we will review the conduct and legality of controversial National Security Agency programs. We will discuss in detail the domestic phone metadata program, PRISM, and “upstream” Internet monitoring.
>
> < - >
>
> https://www.coursera.org/course/surveillance
>
> --
> It's better to burn out than fade away.

--
Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.


Hi all,

does anyone knows of an email provider enabling enforced SMTP/TLS for
inbound MX-received emails?

Assume that i want my provide to refuse email destinated to me, at
inbound Mail Exchanger level, if they are not coming encrypted with
SMTP/TLS, with a decent TLS version and with a decent cipher.

Ideally, i would like an automatic email to be sent back to the sender
of that email, informing his that his email provider/email server is not
secure and must be updated to enable sending email securely.
It would provide increased security against massive surveillance of my
own email and automatic advocacy and advice for email security to sender
writing me from unsecure email.

Any email provider that enable to do so?

-- 
Fabio Pietrosanti (naif)
HERMES - Center for Transparency and Digital Human Rights
http://logioshermes.org/- https://globaleaks.org/- https://tor2web.org/-
https://ahmia.fi/


Dear list friends, 
I'm starting a project soon called "Resilient Democracy" to examine how to best strengthen and modernize Congress in harmony with the information age.  We hope this initial research will be followed by pilot projects inside Congress itself. 
In defining this concept, I intend to blend insights from technology, governance and security.  (Resilience an appealing catch all word right now) 
If anything occurs to you about resilient systems, I would love any input of ideas, links, reading materials, events, or connections with others who might be working in overlapping or parallel remits. 
Happy New Year!  

-- 
Thanks,
Lorelei Kelly

Resilient Democracy Pilot Lead, Edward M Kennedy Institute for the Senate
Affiliated Scholar, Stanford Center on International Conflict and Negotiation

Tweeting @loreleikelly


From: David Farber <farber at gmail.com>

While the course is over the lectures are available at

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQozwgRaSs_Kv_XicDXZ51XsbYMxpctbJ
Will they spy on the course watchers? After all, it's about surveillance, and I'm pretty sure Stanford University is a prime recipient of NSA etc $$$
On Jan 3, 2016, at 3:32 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:


From: David Farber <farber at gmail.com>

While the course is over the lectures are available at

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQozwgRaSs_Kv_XicDXZ51XsbYMxpctbJ


-- 
Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.
Andrés Pacheco wrote:
> recipient of NSA etc $$$
> I'm pretty

  Do you have a citation for this?

~Griffin

-- 
“I did then what I knew then, & when I knew better, I did better.”
― Maya Angelou


You're kidding, right?

> On Jan 3, 2016, at 5:59 PM, Griffin Boyce <griffin at cryptolab.net> wrote:
> 
> Andrés Pacheco wrote:
>> recipient of NSA etc $$$
>> I'm pretty
> 
>  Do you have a citation for this?
> 
> ~Griffin
> 
> -- 
> “I did then what I knew then, & when I knew better, I did better.”
> ― Maya Angelou
> -- 
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.

From: Catherine Wong <catwong at stanford.edu>

I hope you had a wonderful break, and I wanted to encourage you to apply to an Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW) team I'm leading with Nick Hershey. Last year, while building healthcare software in East Africa, Nick and I found that many international organizations are unable to collect data from the communities they serve. Thus, our goal this year is to build a platform that allows for communication with and data collection from the nearly 60% of the global population that uses cellphones but does not have internet access. Our plan is to build an extension to Google Forms that allows surveys to be sent via SMS or voice calls.
To achieve this goal, we're partnering with mobile technology groups around the world and looking for five students (software engineers, UI/UX designers, and one partner relations) to help us out. Participants will enroll in CEE 177X/S, ESW's international project classes, and should be prepared to enroll during the winter and spring. Depending on funding, some members may travel to implement our technology in India.
Apply here by Wednesday, January 5th, 11:59pm!
Thanks!Cathy
-- 
Catherine WongStanford University | Class of 2017I read books and write code. 
From: Mehran Sahami <sahami at cs.stanford.edu>
Cc: Jeffrey Ullman <ullman at gmail.com>

The Business & Human Rights Resource Centre has a project to visualize/analyze data related to allegations of corporate abuse and company responses.  Professor Jeff Ullman (CC’ed) has agreed to supervise an undergraduate student who might be interested in working on this project for units (potentially as CS191 Senior Project credit).  If you are interested, please email Prof. Ullman (ullman at gmail.com). Happy New Year!Mehran -----Mehran SahamiProfessor (Teaching)Associate Chair for EducationComputer Science Department
From: Jackie Fielder <jackie4 at stanford.edu>

    Check out this 2-unit Human Rights course with Professor David Palumbo-Liu. There are no written assignments or exams.  Your grade will be based solely on your doing the assigned reading and the quality of your contributions to the website.

    Our first class meeting will be Thursday January 15 at 9:30 am, for location please check Explore Courses or contact Professor Palumbo-Liu [palboliu at stanford.edu].  If you cannot regularly attend at that time, but wish to enroll, Professor Palumbo-Liu will work with you to see what other times you can meet.

Cheers,
Jackie

If it's so obvious that this is true you should have no trouble
providing a citation.

On 01/03/2016 05:18 PM, Andrés Pacheco wrote:
> You're kidding, right?
>
>> On Jan 3, 2016, at 5:59 PM, Griffin Boyce <griffin at cryptolab.net> wrote:
>>
>> Andrés Pacheco wrote:
>>> recipient of NSA etc $$$
>>> I'm pretty
>>  Do you have a citation for this?
>>
>> ~Griffin
>>
>> -- 
>> “I did then what I knew then, & when I knew better, I did better.”
>> ― Maya Angelou
>> -- 
>> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.



  Also this point seems a bit silly. Of course youtube will keep a record of what you are watching. And one can assume that the NSA is keeping tabs on youtube as well regardless of whether Stanford has received any money from them. It is still important for people to understand surveillance law. Whether Stanford produced this course or not should make no difference. 
 
 - Cooper
 
 On 01/03/2016 03:25 PM, Andrés Pacheco wrote:
  
 Will they spy on the course watchers? After all, it's about surveillance, and I'm pretty sure Stanford University is a prime recipient of NSA etc $$$ 
 On Jan 3, 2016, at 3:32 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
 
  
   From: David Farber <farber at gmail.com>
 
  While the course is over the lectures are available at
 
 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQozwgRaSs_Kv_XicDXZ51XsbYMxpctbJ
    
 
 -- 
 Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu. 
 
  
 
 
 From: Nadav Hollander <nadavh at stanford.edu>
Cc: roblerangers at lists.stanford.edu
~Forward Widely~
Interested in Bitcoin / Crypto Currencies?  Get hands-on experience in CS251P
By popular demand, Dan Boneh and Balaji Srinivasan -- Board Partner at a16z and CEO of 21 Inc. -- will be teaching a 1-unit lab course this Winter called Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies Lab.  Every Monday from 4:30 to 5:20 pm, students will have a host of opportunities to build bitcoin-powered applications on the cutting-edge 21 Bitcoin Computer.  See more at bitcoin.stanford.edu and sign up ASAP before the class fills up!

Bitcoin & Crypto Currencies Lab

CS251P (Winter) - 1 Unit

Repeatable for credit


Bitcoin has the potential to change how payments are done on the Internet and beyond. In this class, you will build Bitcoin-powered versions of many of the most popular internet services. For example, you will build a search engine that takes in a small amount of bitcoin for each query, a social network that allows individuals to buy internet celebrity endorsements for bitcoin, and a content site that charges a small amount of bitcoin for each page view. In each case, we will show how Bitcoin micropayments can supplant or complement the traditional ad-supported model. The course is based on a weekly hackathon; each Monday you will receive some stub code illustrating the basic mechanics of a Bitcoin-powered internet service, and you will improve this as best you can as an individual or in a small group by the end of Sunday on that week. Winners of each week's hackathon will be recognized. Prerequisites: No previous Bitcoin knowledge is required. Students who have taken CS251 or CS251P will have more context, but this course is all new material. Recommended: Intensive programming experience at the level of CS107 or above.


Previous enrollment in Autumn CS251/251p helpful but not required.  Explore Courses link here.
Let me know if you have any questions!

​

Cheers,Nadav
-- 
Nadav HollanderB.S. Candidate in Computer Science -- Stanford University 2017949.293.5907

I have been reading about Mr Trump's ideas for addressing the risks of terror minded people who often hide behind the Muslim faith in order to validate their mental illness.Has he outlined any methodology for accomplishing this goal? Will he have a questionnaire for travelers to complete? Is there going to be a genetic test? Will certain nations have all travel closed? Would Muslims who are in the United States be required to identify with maybe a patch on their clothing? Does Israel have anything that they would care to contribute to this discussion?I appreciate your good work I'm amazed at how tangled web are woven around a quite harmless joke, stating the obvious: the top tech research institutions in the USA gave always received funding from the US Government. May I remind anybody that DARPA funded the original project that "invented" the Internet on a DEC pdp-11? Sí, how come you guts are so sensitive to the topic now?
On Jan 4, 2016, at 2:32 PM, Cooper Quintin <lists at cooperq.com> wrote:


 Also this point seems a bit silly. Of course youtube will keep a record of what you are watching. And one can assume that the NSA is keeping tabs on youtube as well regardless of whether Stanford has received any money from them. It is still important for people to understand surveillance law. Whether Stanford produced this course or not should make no difference. 
 
 - Cooper
 
 On 01/03/2016 03:25 PM, Andrés Pacheco wrote:
  
 Will they spy on the course watchers? After all, it's about surveillance, and I'm pretty sure Stanford University is a prime recipient of NSA etc $$$ 
 On Jan 3, 2016, at 3:32 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:
 
  
   From: David Farber <farber at gmail.com>
 
  While the course is over the lectures are available at
 
 https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQozwgRaSs_Kv_XicDXZ51XsbYMxpctbJ
    
 
 -- 
 Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu. 
 
  
 
 
 

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From: Ginger Paque <gpaque at gmail.com>

The call for nominations for the IGF 2016 MAG has been posted on the IGF website:
http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/magabout/mag-renewal-announcement
The deadline for submission nominations through the nomination form is 1 February 2016. 
This is an important process, and I encourage interested people to join!
Best wishes for 2016, Ginger
Ginger (Virginia) PaqueDiploFoundationDiploFoundation upcoming online courses: http://www.diplomacy.edu/courses
You should look at Karl Weick's work on resilient systems. Here is an
example: http://www.amazon.com/Managing-Unexpected-Resilient-Performance-Uncertainty/dp/0787996491/

On Sun, Jan 3, 2016 at 12:19 PM, Lorelei Kelly <loreleikelly at gmail.com> wrote:
> Dear list friends,
>
> I'm starting a project soon called "Resilient Democracy" to examine how to
> best strengthen and modernize Congress in harmony with the information age.
> We hope this initial research will be followed by pilot projects inside
> Congress itself.
>
> In defining this concept, I intend to blend insights from technology,
> governance and security.  (Resilience an appealing catch all word right now)
>
> If anything occurs to you about resilient systems, I would love any input of
> ideas, links, reading materials, events, or connections with others who
> might be working in overlapping or parallel remits.
>
> Happy New Year!
>
> --
> Thanks,
>
> Lorelei Kelly
>
> Resilient Democracy Pilot Lead, Edward M Kennedy Institute for the Senate
>
> Affiliated Scholar, Stanford Center on International Conflict and
> Negotiation
>
> Tweeting @loreleikelly
>
>
>
> --
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of
> list guidelines will get you moderated:
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.Unsubscribe,
> change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at
> companys at stanford.edu.


From: Jennifer Granick <jennifer at law.stanford.edu>
http://www.leuphana.de/en/research-centers/cdc/digital-cultures-research-lab/events/summer-school-2016.html
Call For ParticipantsHackademia: empirical studies in computing cultures A Digital Cultures Research Lab (DCRL) Summer School August 28th – September 2nd, 2016Leuphana University  Curated byPaula Bialski, Leuphana UniversityGabriella Coleman, McGill University Marcell Mars, Leuphana University BackgroundStudying digital media today means studying those technologists—hackers, security resarchers, game developers, system administrators, and designers—who create and maintain the digital worlds we live in. How much agency lies in the hands of programmers, coders, and engineers to create our digital worlds is still up for debate, yet this much is true: various hacking and related subcultures form critical nodes of practice that help shape and condition the contemporary technologies we use everyday. Whether it is an analyst or coder implementing algorithms at a large financial institution, a group of designers working on improving the user interface for a cryptographic tool, a privacy team securing a browser, a developer coding her own app, cryptographers working on an open source anoymized system, a programmer worki ng on a p2p file-sharing platform, hackers buying and selling zero days in a grey market, a team of system administrators at Google working to scale up services, a journalist-coder developing visualization tools, indie game developers seeking to write a politically minded game, or a hacker-leaker whistleblowing to salavage privacy - all have something to say about how digital technology can and should be created.These technology workers/experts are now central to every field of social, political, and economic import. They secure our communications networks; shape the design and portals we use to connect to our banks, our friends, our loved ones, our colleagues, our business partners; inform us about the activities of our governments; design novel currencies; exfiltrate intellectual property and proof of wrongdoing from corporate actors; offer us alternative ways of organizing our political voices whether through political projects or games; function as conduits and warriors between nations; and allow us to confront the laws we don’t like – through democratic engagements, as in the Free Software movement, or tools that enable outright circumvention.This is an ideal time to understand and ultimately appraise their activities, actions, their desires, and intentions. While an increasing number of scholars – ethnographers, cultural anthropologists, sociologists, and media historians – are undertaking the study of hacker cultures, there are many methodological questions to pose and explore: How much technical knowledge is necessary to study the worlds of computing and programming?  How does one gain access to secret nooks of hacking or corporate sites – whether a security company, gaming outfit, or blackhat computer forum – where codes, designers, and hackers labor? How is the study of hackers similar and different to the study of other experts such as scientists? As participant observers, how can we fully understand the engineering culture of the hackers we are studying, and what shortcuts in our methods must be taken in order to create an understanding?Who Should Apply?  This summer school invites doctoral students in the field of ethnography, cultural anthropology, media studies, software studies, sociology, science, technology stu dies, history, or other, who are currently working on a dissertation on the life-worlds, practices, cultures, or platforms of hackers. Hackers here are understood broadly as programmers, coders, pirates, and computer engineers of all shapes and forms – and do not necessarily have to be engaged in illegal or subversive activity or self identify as hackers. Applicants who are struggling with field entry, are learning to code, or seek to expand their methods, are particularly welcome.Who Will Attend?This summer school will provide a dialogue between hackers and academics. As such, we will additionally invite a number of hackers, coders, programmers, and technologists. These guests will lead sessions around the topic of field entrance, knowledge transfer, work organization and hacker communication practices, feminist critiques, and standards/protocols. Keynote speakers will also provide evening lectures, and help lead sessions.Where and when will this take place?The Hackademia summer school will take place at the Digital Cultures Research Lab (DCRL), Leuphana University in Luneburg, Germany (30 minutes away from Hamburg), between August 28th – September 2nd, 2016. How to apply:Please submit your CV along with a 500-word abstract of your dissertation, and a 500-word explanation on why you would like to attend this summer school. The deadline for applications for the summer school is January 4th, 2016. Please email your applications (compile into one PDF) to bialski at leuphana.deAll applicants will be informed about the selection of participants in mid-February.The working language of the summer school will be English; therefore, a sufficient understanding of English is expected. There is no participation fee. The organizers will cover accommodation costs. We have a limited amount of need-based travel funding available. Please indicate in your application letter if you wish to apply for travel funding.For further information on the DCRL, please visit:http://cdc.leuphana.com/structure/digital-cultures-research-lab/project/research
**apologies for cross-posting** 

Hi again, everyone— 
Our final acceptance deadline is approaching on January 8. Apply to participate on our website [2]. Please feel free to send any and all questions to us organizers via email [3].

Some colleagues and I are co-organizing a one-day workshop at CHI 2016 in San Jose, CA and we’d like to invite y’all to participate. The call for participation— as well as workshop details, submission dates, and additional information— is available online now [1]. 

The goal of the workshop is to first and foremost build a community of researchers, practitioners, and organizers around the intersection of technological design and social justice. Specifically, we seek to facilitate the conversations necessary to move beyond “design with good intentions” toward design praxis, or reflection and action directed to transform oppressive structures with and by the dispossessed, marginalized, and oppressed. There are examples of projects that contend with individual systems of oppression—­­however, there is presently no unified community or common understanding of how these research projects and activism can hang together. Moreover, there is a clear need to unpack and provide nuanced understandings of HCI projects that promote “good”.

Second, we strive to build knowledge together. In our experience with social justice related projects, there are particular questions that need a broad range of experiences and perspectives to help answer. For example: “How can researchers balance commitments to research and the particular activist project at hand?” or “How can different principles of social justice inform HCI methods such as decolonization or intersectionality?” In particular, we are interested in building knowledge around design methods, researcher reflexivity, and different epistemic approaches toward design. Just as design is often generative and future looking, so too are social justice endeavors. As the late Grace Lee Boggs, a feminist social activist and philosopher, stated, “…we have the power within us to create ourselves and the world anew”.

Apply to participate on our website [2]. 
Please feel free to send any and all questions to us organizers via email [3].

Thanks— we look forward to seeing folks' submissions! 

Warmly,Sarah, Mariam, Katherine, Jill, Lynn, and Shaowen 

[1] http://depts.washington.edu/tatlab/socialjustice/ [2http://depts.washington.edu/tatlab/socialjustice/submit/[3socialjusticeanddesign at gmail.com

From: Priscila Garcia <pgarc47 at stanford.edu>
Cc: Valerie Y Chow <vychow at stanford.edu>, Hilary Douglas <hilaryd at stanford.edu>


 What are you doing this summer?Stanford will pay you to do good in the world. Various types of public service fellowships are available as part of the campus-wideCardinal Quarter initiative.  Funded fellowships are open to undergraduates, providing $4000 base stipends for nine-week summer experiences in the U.S. and abroad.  Additional financial supplements are available to those who qualify.  The application deadline for many Cardinal Quarter opportunities isTuesday, February 9th. Want to learn more about Cardinal Quarter opportunities?  Please visit ourwebsite for more information.   Here are some upcoming events to learn about opportunities and to help with application materials: Haas Center Undergraduate Fellowships Information SessionThursday, January 7th5pm to 5:30pm, Haas Center DK RoomRSVP here Summer International Service OpportunitiesFriday, January 8th or Wednesday, January 13th12pm to 12:30pm, Haas Center DK Room Spirituality, Service, and Social Change Fellowship Information SessionTuesday, January 12th12pm to 1pm, CIRCLE Common Room (Old Union, 3rd Floor) An Insider Look at Haas Center Summer Fellowships: Peer Advisors PanelWednesday, January 13th7pm to 8pm, Branner Hall LoungeRSVP here   Haas Center Undergraduate Fellowships Resume WorkshopThursday, January 21st12pm to 1pm, Haas Center DK RoomRSVP here Haas Center Undergraduate Fellowships Information SessionMonday, January 25th12:15pm to 12:45pm, Haas Center DK RoomRSVP here Undergraduate Fellowships Application Writing WorkshopTuesday, January 26th5:30pm to 6:30pm, Haas Center DK RoomRSVP here Cardinal Quarter Advising Hours with Haas Center StaffTuesdays between 12-2pm and Fridays between 12:30-2:30pm on the second floor of the Haas Center Fellowships Peer Advisors hold weekly office hours across campus locations Questions?  Contact Valerie Chow (valerie.chow at stanford.edu) or Hilary Douglas (hilaryd at stanford.edu), or reach out to a fellowships peer advisor.  ---
Valerie Chow
Program Director, Undergraduate FellowshipsHaas Center for Public Service
Stanford University562 Salvatierra WalkStanford, CA 94305
650-723-3307
valerie.chow at stanford.eduWeb | Facebook | TwitterThe Haas Center is the hub of Cardinal Service, a university-wide initiative to elevate and expand service at Stanford.
Dear Liberation Tech Colleagues,

(Putting on my "consultant to Annkissam" hat.)

If your nonprofit organization would like to enhance its knowledge sharing or knowledge management but is on a tight budget, then I strongly recommend this article to you:

"Adventures in knowledge management:  Stephanie Berkowitz on sharing knowledge among the staff members at Center for Teen Empowerment"

http://www.annkissam.com/blog/adventures-knowledge-management-1

This is a "bloggerview" that Stephanie Berkowitz (Teen Empowerment's director of external relations) and I did for the Annkissam blog.  It was inspired by a conversation that we had at the most recent Massachusetts Nonprofit Network conference; I asked her about Teen Empowerment's challenges, and she told me that free Google tools designed for nonprofits were meeting their needs very well.

Of course, it's not always the case the right tool for the job is the free or cheap one; however, I'm delighted when I come across case in which the nonprofit organization is very happy and the cost is very low.  Not everyone needs to spend $500,000. implementing a knowledge management solution.  In fact, there is quite a range of options.  If you'd like to know more about the options, please take a look at this cheat sheet on Annkissam's nonprofit knowledge management web site:

http://nonprofitknowledgemanagement.com/approaches

Best regards from Deborah

Deborah Elizabeth Finn
Consultant to Annkissam
deborah at annkissam.com
http://www.annkissam.com/
617-504-8188 (mobile phone)
617-958-1959 (voice mail)
@Deborah909 (Twitter)
Deborah909 (Skype)
www.linkedin.com/in/deborah909 (LinkedIn)
From: Rebecca Tabasky <rtabasky at cyber.law.harvard.edu>

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University is now accepting applications for our summer 2016 internship program*. **
*
Information about the summer program and links to the application procedures can be found below and at http://brk.mn/summer*
*
The application deadline for all students for summer 2016 is Friday, February 12, 2016 at 11:59 p.m. ET

With thanks, and all best,
Becca

---*

Berkman Center for Internet & Society 2016 Summer Internship Program*
*Application deadline for all students for summer 2016 is Friday, February 12, 2016 at 11:59 p.m. ET*
*Information about the summer program and links to the application procedures can be found below and at **http://brk.mn/summer****

About the Program*
Each summer the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University swings open the doors of our vibrant yellow house to welcome a group of talented and curious students as full-time interns - Berkterns! <http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=berktern>- who are passionate about the promise of the Internet. Finding connected and complementary research inquiries among their diverse backgrounds, students represent all levels of study, are being trained in disciplines across the board, and come from universities all over the world to tackle issues related to the core of Berkman’s research agenda. Summer interns jump head first into the swirl of the Berkman universe, where they are deeply and substantively involved in our research projects and efforts.**

Becoming invaluable contributors to the Center’s operation and success, interns conduct collaborative and independent research under the guidance of Berkman staff, fellows, and faculty. Specific roles, tasks, and experiences vary depending on Center needs and interns' skills; a list of expected opportunities for Summer 2016 is on the Berkman summer internship page <http://harvard.us10.list-manage.com/track/click?u=ef13e6d75b74b1791f13115cd&id=ffd3194cd9&e=713200df58>. Typically, the workload of each intern is primarily based under one project or suite of projects, with encouragement and flexibility to get involved in additional projects across the Center.

In addition to joining research teams, summer interns participate in special lectures with Berkman Center faculty and fellows, engage each other through community experiences like weekly interns discussion hours, and attend Center-wide events and gatherings with members of the wider Berkman community. As well, each year interns establish new channels for fun and learning, such as organizing debates and pub quizzes; establishing reading groups and book clubs; producing podcasts and videos; and hosting potlucks, cook-offs, and BBQs (fortunately for us, people share).

The word "awesome" has been thrown around to describe our internships, but don't take our word for it.  Interns Royze Adolfo and Hilda Barasa documented the summer 2012 internship experience here <http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/berkmancentersummer2012/>.  Former intern Zachary McCune had this to say: "it has been an enchanting summer working at the berkman center for internet & society.  everyday, i get to hang out with some of the most brilliant people on the planet. we talk, we write (emails), we blog, we laugh, we play rock band. and when things need to get done, we stay late hyped on free coffee and leftover food. it is a distinct honor to be considered a peer among such excellent people. and i am not just talking about the fellows, staff, and faculty, though they are all outstanding. no, i mean my peers as in my fellow interns, who are almost definitely the ripening next generation of changemakers."*

Time Commitment*
Summer internships are full time positions (35 hours/week) for 10 weeks.
The Summer 2016 program will run from Monday, June 6 through Friday, August 12.*

Payment*
Interns are paid $11.50 an hour, with the exception of certain opportunities for law students who receive summer public interest funds (more about these specific cases at the link for law students below).

No other benefits are provided, and interns must make their own housing, insurance, and transportation arrangements.*

Commitment to Diversity*
The work and well-being of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University are strengthened profoundly by the diversity of our network and our differences in background, culture, experience, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, and much more. We actively seek and welcome applications from people of color, women, the LGBTQIA community, and persons with disabilities, as well as applications from researchers and practitioners from across the spectrum of disciplines and methods.

*Eligibility*

 * Internships are open to students enrolled across the full spectrum
   of disciplines.
 * Internships are open to students at different levels of academic
   study including those in bachelor’s, master’s, law, and Ph.D programs.
 * Summer interns do not need to be U.S. residents or in school in the
   U.S.; indeed, we encourage international students to apply.
 * Summer interns do not need an existing affiliation with Harvard
   University.*****
   *

*To Apply*
We know what you're thinking. /Yes please. I want that. That sounds magical.  Did I mention that I have incredible dance moves <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGQbFqH6D4g>?/ Here's what you should do...

 * *Law students:* please find application instructions and important
   additional information here
   <https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/getinvolved/internships_summer_law>.
 * *Students from disciplines other than law:* please find more
   information and application instructions here
   <https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/getinvolved/internships_summer_other>.

*The application deadline for all students for summer 2016 is Friday, February 12, 2016 at 11:59 p.m. ET*

-- 
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