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[liberationtech] Camelia Florela Voinea's new book on Amazon!

Camelia Voinea camelia_voinea at yahoo.com
Sat Mar 12 08:33:19 PST 2016


New book: "Computational Modelling of Political Attitudes" by Camelia Florela Voinea (forthcoming at John Wiley & Sons): 
    "My new book on political attitudes modelling makes a synthesis of the research area starting with the early 1950s. See more details in my new post on LinkedIn: "Future: A Matter of Attitude": "... My book on "Computational Modeling of Political Attitudes" (forthcoming at John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.) has been conceived as a competence-building project in explaining the political attitude formation and change phenomena. It is addressed to the scientist fellows all over the world who might want to scale up their expertise from computational skills to simulation-based modelling. ===> See more details on amazon.com!
===================================Camelia Florela Voinea, Ph.D.  Associate Professor  Political Sciences, International Relations and Security Studies Department  Political Science Faculty  University of Bucharest, Romania  Office Address: #8, Spiru Haret Street, Bucharest 010175  E-mail(s): camelia.voinea at fspub.unibuc.ro , camelia_voinea at yahoo.com  Home Page: https://sites.google.com/a/fspub.unibuc.ro/conf-univ-dr-camelia-florela-voinea/  You can access my papers on SSRN at: http://ssrn.com/author=2103805

      From: "liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu" <liberationtech-request at lists.stanford.edu>
 To: liberationtech at lists.stanford.edu 
 Sent: Saturday, March 5, 2016 10:41 PM
 Subject: liberationtech Digest, Vol 261, Issue 2
   
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Today's Topics:

  1. CPDP2016 Computers, Privacy and Data Protection - watch all
      the debates online! (Bram W)
  2. Stanford HCI Seminar 3/4, Ed Cutrell, Microsoft Research ?
      HCI4D: Cultural learnings of India for make benefit glorious
      field of HCI (Yosem Companys)
  3. Reminder: Call for Two Volumes of Emerald Studies in Media
      and Communication on Latin America (Laura Robinson)
  4. The open source city as the transnational    democratic future
      (text) (Bernardo Guti?rrez)
  5. UNM is looking for an OTF Fellow to do reverse engineering or
      Internet measurement (Jed Crandall)
  6. Network Metadata: What's all the fuss about? (Yosem Companys)
  7. Bringing Computers to Emerging Markets: Dinner at Stanford
      with Endless Mobile (3/2) (Yosem Companys)
  8. Internet Politician Database (IPDb) (Yosem Companys)
  9. Ebola: A Big Data Disaster (Sean McDonald)
  10. alkasir 2.0: One more anti-censorship tool launched
      (Walid AL-SAQAF)
  11. Re: Ebola: A Big Data Disaster (Lina Srivastava)
  12. Re: alkasir 2.0: One more anti-censorship tool    launched
      (Nathan of Guardian)
  13. Silicon Valley Must Be Redistributed (J.M. Porup)
  14. Stingray technology in use around the world? (Yosem Companys)
  15. Re: Silicon Valley Must Be Redistributed (Joshua Kopstein)
  16. Re: Silicon Valley Must Be Redistributed (J.M. Porup)
  17. unmonitored international communication? (Carolyn Santo)
  18. Re: unmonitored international communication? (J.M. Porup)
  19. Re: unmonitored international communication? (Seth David Schoen)
  20. Re: unmonitored international communication? (George Kadianakis)
  21. Join Stanford Crowd Course Initiative: collaborate and spread
      the ICTD knowledge with people around the world (Yosem Companys)
  22. Re: Ebola: A Big Data Disaster (Heather Leson)
  23. Net of Rights (Niels ten Oever)
  24. Whistleblower systems in local governments (Yosem Companys)
  25. Ford Foundation Hiring Technology Fellows (Yosem Companys)
  26. Re: Whistleblower systems in local governments
      (Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) - lists)
  27. Hot Topics in Privacy Enhancing Technologies (HotPETs 2016)
      Call for Talks (Moritz Bartl)
  28. Surveillance Capitalism (Yosem Companys)
  29. Re: Surveillance Capitalism (Andr?s Pacheco)
  30. Re: Surveillance Capitalism (Aaron Wolf)
  31. Open Data Day -- Tell me every #opendata best    practice you
      see (Yosem Companys)
  Hi all,
 
 All the debates of CPDP2016 - Computers, Privacy and Data Protection conference in Brussels (January 2016) are now online to enjoy: https://www.youtube.com/user/CPDPConferences.
 
 A lot of privacy and data protection related topics: the EU Data Protection reform, Global developments in data protection regulation, Internet of Things, Big Data, Wearables, EU-US developments concerning the regulation of government surveillance and data transfers, Cybersecurity, Internet governance and privacy, Privacy and Innovation and much, much more.
 
 More than 340 speakers, including: Alexander Joel, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) (US), Annie Machon, former MI5 intelligence officer and whistleblower (UK), Birgitta Jónsdóttir, Member of Icelandic Pirate Party (IS), Giovanni Buttarelli, EDPSJan-Philipp Albrecht, MEP (EU), Joanna Cavan, Interception of Commissioner's Office (IOCCO) (UK), Julie Brill, Federal Trade Commission (US), Martin Schulz, President of the European Parliament (EU), Max Schrems, Data Protection Activist  (AT), Paul Nemitz, European Commission (EU), Peter Swire, Georgia Institute of Technology (US), Rachel Brand, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (US), Robert Litt, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) (US), William Binney, former technical director NSA (US), Wouter De Ridder, Belgian Standing Intelligence Agencies Review Committee (BE), ...
 
  _filtered #yiv2795758652 {margin:2cm;}#yiv2795758652 p {margin-bottom:0.25cm;direction:ltr;color:#00000a;line-height:120%;text-align:left;orphans:2;widows:2;}#yiv2795758652 p.yiv2795758652western {font-family:"Calibri", serif;font-size:11pt;}#yiv2795758652 p.yiv2795758652cjk {font-family:"Droid Sans Fallback";font-size:11pt;}#yiv2795758652 p.yiv2795758652ctl {font-size:11pt;}#yiv2795758652 a:link {}Join us next year in Brussels, Belgium: 25 -  27 January 2017.
 
 http://www.cpdpconferences.org/
 
 -- 
 Bram Wets
 Privacy Salon vzw
 
  My PGP public key: http://bit.ly/1O6Gpna  From: Michael Bernstein <msb at cs.stanford.edu>

HCI4D: Cultural learnings of India for make benefit glorious field of HCI
Ed Cutrell, Microsoft Research

March 4, 2016, 12:30-1:30pm, Gates B01 · Open to the public
CS547 Human-Computer Interaction Seminar (Seminar on People, Computers, and Design)
http://hci.st/seminar
http://cs547.stanford.edu/speaker.php?date=2016-03-04

In 2010 I moved to India to begin working in what was for me a new and exciting area of research, ICT4D (ICTs for global development). An important thread in ICT4D research is understanding how the unique context and constraints of developing communities affects the design and goals for systems and technologies, and how these are taken up by end users and beneficiaries: HCI, or what we've come to call HCI4D. Like Borat in America, I will guide you through some fascinating experiences in India that illustrate the importance of understanding the broader context and motivations of the people you're working with. What are their needs and how do we understand if our designs actually meet them? When you ask people what they think about your work, they'll almost inevitably tell you whatever they think you want to hear, even when it's obviously untrue. And an easy-to-use, special purpose system for collecting health information may be junked for a complicated phone application because users want to use the phone for lots of *other* things. To paraphrase Field Marshall Moltke, "No system design survives contact with users in the field", and these issues are massively amplified in the context of HCI4D. As Gary Marsden from University of Cape Town liked to say, HCI for developing regions isn't a different field - it's just extreme HCI.

Ed Cutrell manages the Technology for Emerging Markets (TEM) group at Microsoft Research India. TEM is a multidisciplinary group working to study, design, build, and evaluate technologies and systems useful for people living in underserved rural and urban communities. The goal of this work is to understand how people in the world's poor and developing communities interact with information technologies, and to invent new ways for technology to meet their needs and aspirations. Ed has worked in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) since 2000; he is trained in cognitive neuropsychology, with a PhD from the University of Oregon.
Please circulate--apologies for cross posting. 

Reminder: Call for Two Volumes of Emerald Studies in Mediaand Communication on Latin America VOLUME 12: ICTs and the Politics of Inclusion in LatinAmerica  VOLUME 13: Brazil: Media from the Country of the Future Deadline: March 15, 2016 Emerald Studies in Media and Communication is delighted toannounce the call for 2016. 
We are inviting submission of original, unpublishedpapers for two volumes to be published on Latin America with guest editors fromArgentina and Brazil. 
Thanks to a short publication cycle, authors will seetheir work in print within 12 months of submission by the deadline.   Submissions should be 6,000-12,000 words in length inclusiveof abstract, references, and notes. 
British or American spelling may be used.While no special formatting is requested at the outset, upon acceptance authorsmust format their manuscripts in accordance with the series' guidelines. 
Contributions will be peer-reviewed through editorial screening and anonymousrefereeing by external reviewers. ​For more information, please see http://www.emeraldmediastudies.com/  VOLUME 12: ICTs and the Politics of Inclusion in LatinAmerica  This volume assembles relevant research focusing on ICTs inLatin America. The mobile broadband revolution is taking place in LatinAmerica. 
Despite various constraints faced by Latin American countries, thespread of mobile telephony and broadband Internet has reached very high levelseven among low-income populations. 
However about half of the continent’spopulation remains unconnected, and the benefits of connectivity have been slowto materialize.Submissions may examine any aspect of the theme of digitaldivide in Latin America and the politics of digital inclusion. 
We welcomesubmissions on different dimensions of the theme such as mobile youthidentities, technology affordability, school transformation by digital media,the diffusion of e-commerce platforms and digital technology in SMEs. 
We areinterested in submissions that address theoretical and/or methodological issueson the topic. Guest Editors: Hernan Galperin, Alejandro Artopoulos, andJason Beech   VOLUME 13: Brazil: Media from the Country of the Future This volume assembles research on any aspect of Brazilianmedia and communication in its various forms. 
The parameters are set as broadlyas possible as long as the research speaks to a facet of the topic as definedin the call for submissions. 
Submissions may be empirical, theoretical, ormethodological--using any method or approach. 
The volume aims to encompassresearch on emergent phenomena, as well as studies with a historical orlongitudinal dimension. 
Comparative studies are welcome as long as Brazil isone of the central case studies.  Guest Editors: Sonia Virgínia Moreira, Monica Martinez,Heloisa Pait, Joseph D. Straubhaar, Antonio C. La Pastina, Samantha NogueiraJoyce, and Pedro Aguiar

Laura Robinson
http://www.laurarobinson.org/
laura at laurarobinson.org

Assistant Professor, Santa Clara University
Affiliated Faculty, UC Berkeley ISSI
CITAMS Past Chair 
Series Editor, Emerald Studies in Media and Communication

Hello you all

I share wiht you the text I pusblished in State of Power (TNI annual publication). "The open source city as the transnational democratic future" is an essay around free software and open source citizen practices in cities, linked with radical and direct democracy. Special focus on Madrid, Barcelona and new citizen local governments of Spain


https://www.tni.org/en/publication/the-open-source-city-as-the-transnational-democratic-future

Best
Bernardo

-- 
http://www.futuramedia.net/
http://www.codigo-abierto.cc/
@bernardosampa (twitter) / @futura_media
São Paulo +55 11 43044380 (fixo) +55 11 984881620 (celular)


Hi all,

By now many of you know about the OTF Fellowship, that's due March 25th:

https://www.opentech.fund/article/announcing-opening-2016-information-controls-fellowship

I'm specifically looking for Fellows (preferably senior) wanting to
physically or digitally be hosted at the University of New Mexico in
Albuquerque (USA).  I'm looking for folks with reverse engineering
skills or experience with Internet measurement, especially low-level
programming of NIC cards like PF_RING.  Here are a couple of papers
that should give you some idea of the kinds of projects we're working
on:

http://www.cs.unm.edu/~crandall/foci2015.pdf
http://www.cs.unm.edu/~crandall/pets2015.pdf

Please pass this along to anyone you know who might be interested, or
put them in touch with me (crandall at cs.unm.edu).  Thanks!

Jed



From: Priyanka Puram Sekhar <psekhar at stanford.edu>

Applied Cybersecurity is a new student group on the Stanford campus,
and we are having our last workshop of the quarter (about metadata
collection and analysis) this Thursday. Would you be able to send this
to the considering CS and CS major list?

Thank you for considering!

*****

Network Metadata: What's all the fuss about?
Thursday, March 3 4:30-6pm

Edward Snowden's NSA revelations made "metadata" a hot news topic as
well as a political football. After a brief review of its origin and
history, this talk will explain exactly what network metadata is;
where it fits in the spectrum of network traffic analysis; why it
remains useful even for encrypted traffic; and how you can use it to
observe a rich range of system behaviors. Join us for a survey of this
timely and interesting topic with Stanford netflow expert John Gerth
(CS/EE) and Alex Keller (SoE).


From: Vicki Niu <vniu at stanford.edu>

Bringing affordable computing to emerging markets!

Nuritzi Sanchez

founding member of

 Endless Mobile

Wed. March 2| 5:00 - 6:00 PM | OU 200 | Dinner provided!
 
Nuritzi Sanchez (Stanford B.A. in International Relations) was a founding member of Endless Mobile, a start-up for creating low-cost computers for developing countries. After establishing headquarters in San Francisco and taking on various business roles within the company, Sanchez became the Manager of Special Projects and executes projects with a diverse team around the globe. Endless has great potential for empowering emerging markets. David Kelley, founder of Stanford's d.school, and Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunnus sit on Endless Mobile's board of advisors. 

From: Matias Nso <matias.nso at kuorum.org>

My name is Matías and I am founder of Kuorum. We are carrying out a transparency project called IPDb (Internet Politician Database), the world's largest politician database. And we are seeking partnerships with universities, and transparency and open data organizations to scale the project faster. If this opportunity might be of interest for you, don't hesitate to contact us as soon as possible and we will give you more information.
We thank you for your time!
Yours faithfully,
Matías Nso | CEO y co-founder | www.kuorum.org 
+34 651 035 718 | matias.nso at kuorum.org  Follow us and don't miss a thing! ᐧ
I'm excited to present some new research: "Ebola: A Big Data Disaster," published by the Center for Internet & Society (with support from the Media Democracy Fund). It's a look at the way that technology was used during the Ebola response - with a focus on Call Detail Records, the experimental nature of data modeling in humanitarian response, and how that likely violates West Africa's well-developed (but under-implemented) data laws.
My hope is that it will kick off a larger discussion about the risks (legal and operational) of digitizing humanitarian response - especially when it involves the use of large scale, sensitive data like CDRs (all anonymization and re-identification caveats apply). As practice stands, international organizations are likely putting themselves and the people they help at considerable risk, in violation of human rights law, data protection law, local regulation, and potentially commercial property law (among other theories of litigation). 
This case study focuses on Liberia, which didn't turn over CDR access - but many of the same operational considerations and laws apply in Sierra Leone and Guinea, where several mobile network operators did. 
I'd love any thoughts, connections to people working on these issues, or critical feedback. 
Best,
SeanDear colleagues,
After over a year of hard work, we've finally launched our BETA release of Alkasir 2.0, a website censorship mapping and circumvention tool. We are still working on the mobile app and hope to have it launched this year. 
The software went through a major transformation from a Windows-based closed program to a security-audited cross-platform open-source solution. It is still a BETA release and we do expect to get bug reports and feedback from users as well as an interest by developers to contribute to it via the Github repository at https://github.com/alkasir/ . 
Here's a blog post on the launch: https://23c.se/our-blog/alkasir-20-free-speech-advancing-knowledge/

As a software developer and a researcher, I find that understanding phenomena such as Internet censorship as equally important as helping citizens overcome such censorship. This is why I am always interested in publishing research on this topic, the latest being a journal article in the most recent edition of the Media and Communication Open Access Journal. The article helps shed light on the use of Alkasir to bypass censorship in Syria between 2010 and 2012: http://www.cogitatiopress.com/ojs/index.php/mediaandcommunication/issue/view/37
There are many people to thank for making this happen, especially the developer Thomas Frössman of 23Critters and friends at Internews. I take this opportunity to express my gratitude to my good friend Eric Johnson who believed in the idea of split-tunneling from the very beginning and spared no effort to help me take it to the next level. Thank you Eric for your friendship and support over the years...

Sincerely,

Walid Al-Saqaf
FounderAlkasir for Website Mapping and Circumventionhttps://alkasir.com/
Hi all -- 
Is there a protocol to adding someone from off the list to a discussion thread here? This study is fascinating and I mentioned it to a friend who co-founded Flowminder, and I think he'd love to discuss.
Lina
On Wed, Mar 2, 2016 at 12:21 PM, Sean McDonald <seanmartinmcdonald at gmail.com> wrote:

I'm excited to present some new research: "Ebola: A Big Data Disaster," published by the Center for Internet & Society (with support from the Media Democracy Fund). It's a look at the way that technology was used during the Ebola response - with a focus on Call Detail Records, the experimental nature of data modeling in humanitarian response, and how that likely violates West Africa's well-developed (but under-implemented) data laws.
My hope is that it will kick off a larger discussion about the risks (legal and operational) of digitizing humanitarian response - especially when it involves the use of large scale, sensitive data like CDRs (all anonymization and re-identification caveats apply). As practice stands, international organizations are likely putting themselves and the people they help at considerable risk, in violation of human rights law, data protection law, local regulation, and potentially commercial property law (among other theories of litigation). 
This case study focuses on Liberia, which didn't turn over CDR access - but many of the same operational considerations and laws apply in Sierra Leone and Guinea, where several mobile network operators did. 
I'd love any thoughts, connections to people working on these issues, or critical feedback. 
Best,
Sean
--
Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.




-- 

--
Lina Srivastava
--
twitter  |  linkedin |  facebook  | instagram http://www.linasrivastava.com/http://www.regardinghumanity.org/ http://www.whoisdayanicristal.com/
Congratulations on the continued progress, especially the move to
audited open-source code and the adoption of Obfs4proxy. I really look
forward to the mobile app, as well!

On Wed, Mar 2, 2016, at 01:29 PM, Walid AL-SAQAF wrote:
> Dear colleagues,
> 
> After over a year of hard work, we've finally launched our BETA release
> of Alkasir 2.0 <https://alkasir.com/>, a website censorship mapping and
> circumvention tool. We are still working on the mobile app and hope to
> have it launched this year.
> 
> The software went through a major transformation from a Windows-based
> closed program to a security-audited cross-platform open-source solution.
> It is still a BETA release and we do expect to get bug reports and
> feedback from users as well as an interest by developers to contribute to
> it via the Github repository at https://github.com/alkasir/
> <https://github.com/alkasir/> .
> 
> Here's a blog post on the launch:
> https://23c.se/our-blog/alkasir-20-free-speech-advancing-knowledge/
> <https://23c.se/our-blog/alkasir-20-free-speech-advancing-knowledge/>
> 
> As a software developer and a researcher, I find that understanding
> phenomena such as Internet censorship as equally important as helping
> citizens overcome such censorship. This is why I am always interested in
> publishing research on this topic, the latest being a journal article in
> the most recent edition of the Media and Communication Open Access
> Journal. The article helps shed light on the use of Alkasir to bypass
> censorship in Syria between 2010 and 2012:
> http://www.cogitatiopress.com/ojs/index.php/mediaandcommunication/issue/view/37
> 
> There are many people to thank for making this happen, especially the
> developer Thomas Frössman of 23Critters <http://23c.se/> and friends at
> Internews. I take this opportunity to express my gratitude to my good
> friend Eric Johnson who believed in the idea of split-tunneling from the
> very beginning and spared no effort to help me take it to the next level.
> Thank you Eric for your friendship and support over the years...
> 
> Sincerely,
> 
> Walid Al-Saqaf
> 
> Founder
> Alkasir for Website Mapping and Circumvention
> https://alkasir.com/<https://alkasir.com/>
> 
> -- 
> Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations
> of list guidelines will get you moderated:
> https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech.
> Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator
> at companys at stanford.edu.


-- 
  Nathan of Guardian
  nathan at guardianproject.info

The continued existence of Silicon Valley in its current form is the
single greatest threat to the human race we face today.

As the FBI v Apple fiasco makes clear, any Silicon Valley business can
be commandeered, coerced to serve the surveillance apparatus. [0]

The solution: We must disrupt Silicon Valley, redistribute innovation
around the world.

That's why we founded the LatAm Startups Conference. [1]

Unlike many "entrepreneurship initiatives," our goal is not a
thinly-disguised counter-insurgency program designed to create nations
of shopkeepers.

Our goal is to end the brain drain to Silicon Valley, to encourage the
modern Janissaries on whom the empire depends to go home, to stay home,
to build globally-scalable businesses from their home countries.

Ensuring internet freedom is a business and political problem as much as
it is a technical problem. And when the American secret police are
hellbent on betraying every last principle of freedom that the country
was founded on, it's time for you to pick up your toys and go play
somewhere else.

The third annual LatAm Startups Conf takes place in Mexico City in
October. [2] To celebrate Conf 3.0, we're releasing 30 tickets for only
$100. We expect tickets to sell out quickly, so if you're interested,
grab one now. [3]

Hacking for freedom means not just technical solutions, but business
solutions. Startups are motivated by greed, but also by idealism. Show
them a better way to make money--and avoid coercion--and they will take
it.

Hack the planet.

jmp

[0] https://medium.com/@toholdaquill/plunder-it-s-a-thing-b449485812bc
[1] https://www.latamstartups.biz/
[2] https://www.latamstartups.biz/conference2016.html
[3] https://www.latamstartups.biz/tickets.html




From: Steve Anderson <steve at openmedia.ca>

Hi all -- I'm looking into Stingray/IMSI-capture technology use and wondering if anyone on this list knows of examples of where it is being used around the world. 
I've started a document to crowdsource examples of StringRay use here if anyone is interested in contributing: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1B8HO8SSJrqJbmytsehStt-U3sw9KyLzHsehl9f81rDw/edit
Please add any examples you know about or email them to me. Examples I've uncovered so far are also listed here below: 

START: 
Australia
   
   - Revealed in 2014

France (contemplated)   
   - source

Germany (with oversight):   
   - source

Ireland:   
   - Privacy International and The Sunday Times reported on the usage of StingRays and IMSI-catchers in Ireland, against the Irish Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission (GSOC), which is an oversight agency of the Irish police force Garda Síochána.[35][36]
   - 

India:   
   - 2010 report

   
   - 
Libya   
   - source 
Turkey:
   
   - Source

UK   
   - On June 10, 2015 the BBC reported on an investigation by Sky News[37][38] about possible false mobile phone towers being used by the London Metropolitan Police. Commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe refused comment.


US.    
   - Boston police promise to release information on cellphone trackers. Source: New England Center for Investigative Reporting.    
February 29, 2016
   - The author of the Patriot Act asked the FBI to justify stingrays.   
https://twitter.com/csoghoian/status/702632206267719680   
http://sensenbrenner.house.gov/uploadedfiles/stingray_technology_letter.pdf   
February 24, 2016
   - NYPD Has Used Stingrays More Than 1,000 Times Since 2008. Source: NYCLU.    
February 11, 2016. 
   - New York Police Have Used Stingrays Widely, New Documents Show. Source: The Intercept.     
February 11, 2016. 
   - FBI says search warrants not needed to use “stingrays” in public places. Source: Ars Technica.   
January 5, 2015.

CANADA.   
   - What is a Stingray and why should I care? Source: OpenMedia.    
March 3, 2015
   - The cell phone spyware the police don’t want to acknowledge. Source: Toronto Star.    
December 15, 2015.  
   - Vancouver police refuse to disclose use of covert cell spy tech. Source: Global News.   
November 13, 2015. 
   - Are StingRay cellphone surveillance systems used by Vancouver police? Source: CBC.     
November 12, 2015. 
   - Is the Vancouver Police Department sweeping up your cell phone data? Source: OpenMedia. November 12, 2015. 

--Steve Anderson
Founder, Senior Strategist and Internet Governance AnalystOpenMedia.org | The Internet Needs You -->> http://openmedia.org/
604-837-5730
Follow me on Twitter
Follow me on Facebook
*You have the right to link to content and services of your choice online -->> Save The Link 

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Silicon Valley is a garbage fire, but calling it the "greatest threat to the human race" and describing American authorities as uniquely predisposed to coerce the companies based on its soil is laughable. The answer to companies being coerced by the American govt isn't "more global businesses spread out in more countries that are not the US." If anything, the precedent that FBI v Apple sets will only embolden governments to obtain the same coercive power in other countries, including those more repressive than the US. (And those that

Any long-term solution in this area I believe has to start with completely decentralizing the technical infrastructure of software developments and updates. Otherwise we eventually wind up in the same spot with a different governments possessing and utilizing the same coercive powers.

J.M. Porup:
> The continued existence of Silicon Valley in its current form is the
> single greatest threat to the human race we face today.
>
> As the FBI v Apple fiasco makes clear, any Silicon Valley business can
> be commandeered, coerced to serve the surveillance apparatus. [0]
>
> The solution: We must disrupt Silicon Valley, redistribute innovation
> around the world.
>
> That's why we founded the LatAm Startups Conference. [1]
>
> Unlike many "entrepreneurship initiatives," our goal is not a
> thinly-disguised counter-insurgency program designed to create nations
> of shopkeepers.
>
> Our goal is to end the brain drain to Silicon Valley, to encourage the
> modern Janissaries on whom the empire depends to go home, to stay home,
> to build globally-scalable businesses from their home countries.
>
> Ensuring internet freedom is a business and political problem as much as
> it is a technical problem. And when the American secret police are
> hellbent on betraying every last principle of freedom that the country
> was founded on, it's time for you to pick up your toys and go play
> somewhere else.
>
> The third annual LatAm Startups Conf takes place in Mexico City in
> October. [2] To celebrate Conf 3.0, we're releasing 30 tickets for only
> $100. We expect tickets to sell out quickly, so if you're interested,
> grab one now. [3]
>
> Hacking for freedom means not just technical solutions, but business
> solutions. Startups are motivated by greed, but also by idealism. Show
> them a better way to make money--and avoid coercion--and they will take
> it.
>
> Hack the planet.
>
> jmp
>
> [0] https://medium.com/@toholdaquill/plunder-it-s-a-thing-b449485812bc
> [1] https://www.latamstartups.biz/
> [2] https://www.latamstartups.biz/conference2016.html
> [3] https://www.latamstartups.biz/tickets.html
>
>

-- 
Joshua Kopstein
journalist + researcher
http://lawfulintercept.net/
PGP: https://github.com/lawfulintercept/contact



If you want to free the internet, you must end the empire.

Empire today consists of a union of capital and the state.

Disrupting the state I leave to others. Far easier, I would say, to
deprive the empire of the talent it needs to function. That Silicon
Valley needs to fuel its "garbage fire," as you so eloquently put it.

Will other countries commandeer? Sure. Do they command a global
surveillance apparatus with drones and death squads that roam the world
murdering thought criminals? No. They do not.

I would rather be commandeered by Brazil or Germany than the American
Empire. No contest.

jmp

On Thu, Mar 03, 2016 at 06:28:50PM +0000, Joshua Kopstein wrote:
> Silicon Valley is a garbage fire, but calling it the "greatest threat to the human race" and describing American authorities as uniquely predisposed to coerce the companies based on its soil is laughable. The answer to companies being coerced by the American govt isn't "more global businesses spread out in more countries that are not the US." If anything, the precedent that FBI v Apple sets will only embolden governments to obtain the same coercive power in other countries, including those more repressive than the US. (And those that
> 
> Any long-term solution in this area I believe has to start with completely decentralizing the technical infrastructure of software developments and updates. Otherwise we eventually wind up in the same spot with a different governments possessing and utilizing the same coercive powers.
> 
> J.M. Porup:
> > The continued existence of Silicon Valley in its current form is the
> > single greatest threat to the human race we face today.
> >
> > As the FBI v Apple fiasco makes clear, any Silicon Valley business can
> > be commandeered, coerced to serve the surveillance apparatus. [0]
> >
> > The solution: We must disrupt Silicon Valley, redistribute innovation
> > around the world.
> >
> > That's why we founded the LatAm Startups Conference. [1]
> >
> > Unlike many "entrepreneurship initiatives," our goal is not a
> > thinly-disguised counter-insurgency program designed to create nations
> > of shopkeepers.
> >
> > Our goal is to end the brain drain to Silicon Valley, to encourage the
> > modern Janissaries on whom the empire depends to go home, to stay home,
> > to build globally-scalable businesses from their home countries.
> >
> > Ensuring internet freedom is a business and political problem as much as
> > it is a technical problem. And when the American secret police are
> > hellbent on betraying every last principle of freedom that the country
> > was founded on, it's time for you to pick up your toys and go play
> > somewhere else.
> >
> > The third annual LatAm Startups Conf takes place in Mexico City in
> > October. [2] To celebrate Conf 3.0, we're releasing 30 tickets for only
> > $100. We expect tickets to sell out quickly, so if you're interested,
> > grab one now. [3]
> >
> > Hacking for freedom means not just technical solutions, but business
> > solutions. Startups are motivated by greed, but also by idealism. Show
> > them a better way to make money--and avoid coercion--and they will take
> > it.
> >
> > Hack the planet.
> >
> > jmp
> >
> > [0] https://medium.com/@toholdaquill/plunder-it-s-a-thing-b449485812bc
> > [1] https://www.latamstartups.biz/
> > [2] https://www.latamstartups.biz/conference2016.html
> > [3] https://www.latamstartups.biz/tickets.html
> >
> >
> 
> -- 
> Joshua Kopstein
> journalist + researcher
> http://lawfulintercept.net/
> PGP: https://github.com/lawfulintercept/contact
> 


  Because I'm not anywhere close to the level of tech talent/knowledge of the people on this list, I floated this idea by Yosem first.  He suggested sharing with the list.
 
 On Wed, Mar 2, 2016 at 1:35 AM, Carolyn Santo <cysanto at hawaii.rr.com> wrote:
 Hi Yosem,
 
 The recent talk about video games made me wonder about using them as a communication channel that might not be monitored by repressive governments.
 
 For a little more than 2 years my son and I have been playing Clash of Clans.  I am amazed at how many players we have from all parts of the world.  We've made friends with people who live all around the world and our clan has been soundly beaten by clans based all around the world.  Notably, some of our members have been from Palestine, Pakistan, India, Korea (I'm assuming South, but haven't asked), and various European and South American countries.  We've been soundly beaten (I think it's safe to assume the other clan plays a lot) by clans who are based in Iran, Syria, Myanmar, Turkey, China, and Korea (they are the toughest).
 
 I'm amazed that so many people from so many parts of the world play.  The chat function in the clan is a great way to stay in touch.  A set of brothers in our clan invited their Dad to join since they lived in England and he is currently working in Shanghai.
 
 I could see how a group of dissidents could start a clan or even move from clan to clan to lessen the chances of being spied upon. For example, when we allow a new member to join, it's pretty common for them to invite their friends.  A dissident could join a clan and invite his friends and share information in disguise in the chat. His group could have multiple id's and pass partial messages in multiple clans that don't make sense unless you can piece the intended message out of the different chat messages in a number of clans.
 
 When the chat is busy, old messages disappear from the clan view pretty quickly since they get pushed off the bottom of the chat screen.  I can't imagine monitoring the billions of chat entries that occur around the world in Clash of Clans alone.
 
 Or maybe set up a clan as an emergency messaging system if other channels have been cut off or if the leader is arrested.
 
 Just some random thoughts, but the key is figuring out how much monitoring a "bad" government does since it appears that people from repressive countries are allowed to play Clash of Clans.  I know that Iranians play.  We've been beaten by them too many times to count.  (They must play a LOT to be so good!)
 
 Anyway, thank you for all your do.  I appreciate the opportunity to read the liberation tech emails, even though I'm not that tech savvy.
 
 
 
 Added today:
 
 If anyone wants to view our clan, you need a clash of clans base.  If you go to Cuz Can Clan, request to join and put in your message that you are one of Mon's old friends and have permission to join.  We are an English speaking clan with international members.
 
 Even when I'm busy I check into the clan at least 4-5 times per day.
 
 We also have a website and facebook page.  I can see where it would be easy to put different parts of an important communication on all three, so it would be extremely difficult for authorities to piece together the communication unless they closely followed your clan and were members and had access to the chat.  That's where joining other unrelated clans for a period of time would also be useful.  Once a person has been in my clan, for a short period of time after they leave, I can "follow" them by tapping on their id and their profile will tell me which clan they are in.  I can leave my clan and join their clan to chat with them.  Their are millions of players around the world, but I can follow my friends if I know their patterns and which clans they like to visit.
 
 If the authorities figured out my identity, I could always quit playing under that id and start a new base.
 
 Finally, Clash of Clans is really flexible because I can log in and play from my phone (iphone or android), my computer using Bluestacks, or any tablet as long as I have an internet connection.  Thus, it isn't dependent on a specific device. 
 
 Also, this isn't only a kids' game, so you wouldn't necessarily draw suspicion if you are an adult, sitting in Starbucks, and checking your base on your phone.
 
 Hope this sparks some useful ideas for people in need of a good way to communicate without being monitored.
 
 Or, if you have time for a hobby, Clash of Clans is great for teaching strategy, teamwork, and making friends from around the world!  Plus a lot of people practice their English in our chat.  The learning possibilities are huge!
 
 
 
  
 On Thu, Mar 03, 2016 at 12:46:58PM -1000, Carolyn Santo wrote:
> The recent talk about video games made me wonder about using them as a
> communication channel that might not be monitored by repressive governments.

You mean, like the US and British governments?

> Hope this sparks some useful ideas for people in need of a good way to
> communicate without being monitored.

whoops, looks like the fascist scum at the NSA and GCHQ already thought of that:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/10/world/spies-dragnet-reaches-a-playing-field-of-elves-and-trolls.html
https://www.propublica.org/article/world-of-spycraft-intelligence-agencies-spied-in-online-games

jmp


Carolyn Santo writes:

> The recent talk about video games made me wonder about using them as
> a communication channel that might not be monitored by repressive
> governments.

I've heard this idea is interesting to anti-censorship campaigners as
well as to spy agencies.

A disadvantage is that historically a lot of video game network
protocols haven't been even transport-encrypted, let alone end-to-end
encrypted.  So someone monitoring the network could likely even search
for text strings in the traffic and find them, or in any case could
develop software to interpret the game traffic.  This could change if
more game protocols would run over TLS or DTLS.

A further disadvantage is that the game operators themselves could
monitor in-game communications and many of them probably have tools to
do this, not least because multiplayer online games have been plagued by
harassment and griefing and the game operators may want to have an easy
way to review users' communications (which in turn can be applied to
consensual communications too).  Jurisdictions that impose surveillance
capability mandates (like the U.S.) may try to apply these to some kinds
of in-game communications.

An advantage is that some, but not all, surveillance systems may
have been programmed to systematically discard most gaming-related
traffic as uninteresting.  And any given game, especially one that's
not super-popular, might be far down the list of platforms for which a
particular surveillance system or organization develops analysis tools.

-- 
Seth Schoen  <schoen at eff.org>
Senior Staff Technologist                      https://www.eff.org/
Electronic Frontier Foundation                  https://www.eff.org/join
815 Eddy Street, San Francisco, CA  94109      +1 415 436 9333 x107


Seth David Schoen <schoen at eff.org> writes:

> Carolyn Santo writes:
>
>> The recent talk about video games made me wonder about using them as
>> a communication channel that might not be monitored by repressive
>> governments.
>
> I've heard this idea is interesting to anti-censorship campaigners as
> well as to spy agencies.
>
> A disadvantage is that historically a lot of video game network
> protocols haven't been even transport-encrypted, let alone end-to-end
> encrypted.  So someone monitoring the network could likely even search
> for text strings in the traffic and find them, or in any case could
> develop software to interpret the game traffic.  This could change if
> more game protocols would run over TLS or DTLS.
>
> A further disadvantage is that the game operators themselves could
> monitor in-game communications and many of them probably have tools to
> do this, not least because multiplayer online games have been plagued by
> harassment and griefing and the game operators may want to have an easy
> way to review users' communications (which in turn can be applied to
> consensual communications too).  Jurisdictions that impose surveillance
> capability mandates (like the U.S.) may try to apply these to some kinds
> of in-game communications.
>
> An advantage is that some, but not all, surveillance systems may
> have been programmed to systematically discard most gaming-related
> traffic as uninteresting.  And any given game, especially one that's
> not super-popular, might be far down the list of platforms for which a
> particular surveillance system or organization develops analysis tools.
>

The above issues are indeed true. There are also engineering problems on
deploying closed-source video games along with open-source tools. Also NSA/GCHQ
have been tapping into WoW and Second Life for years now, but maybe that would
not be so easy for some censoring governments (e.g. China):
      http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/09/nsa-spies-online-games-world-warcraft-second-lifea

FWIW, here is a paper that somewhat explores this area:
      http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.05904

They even made a PoC as Tor pluggable transport as it seems:
    https://github.com/bridgar/Castle-Covert-Channel
    https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/AChildsGardenOfPluggableTransports#Castle



From: Rajan Vaish <vaish.rajan at gmail.com>

Want to demonstrate and share your knowledge while impacting education? Help create a course on ICTD and spread the knowledge with people around the world. Feel free to teach topics in crowd technologies, computer science, data science, HCI or any other area - its up to you! 
Join the Stanford Crowd Course Initiative to collaboratively create online courses - receive valuable feedback & rec. letter from Stanford professors, build a unique teaching experience, and get your work published on our Stanford platform for a larger audience. 
People from any department/industry are encouraged to apply. For more information about this effort, please check out crowdcourse.stanford.edu, or email Rajan Vaish at rvaish at cs.stanford.edu. 
Thanks, Rajan and Crowd Course Team at Stanford
-- 
Rajan VaishPostdoctoral Researcher at Stanford University | stanford.edu/~rvaish 
Thanks for this great work Sean. 

The recommendations were spot on. Truly I was glad to see ilab Liberia as part of the organizational input as I think local civic tech communities increasingly play a role. 

In addition, there should be more guidelines for tech companies and researchers.  I would be keen to here your thoughts and recommendations in the context of your report. 

The Responsible Data Forum tackles some of these in general. But we will see more and more requests for mobile data /CDRs in the future. 

Heather 


Heather Leson
heatherleson at gmail.com
Twitter: HeatherLeson 
Blog: textontechs.com

On Wed, Mar 2, 2016 at 10:49 PM, Lina Srivastava <lina at linasrivastava.com> wrote:

Hi all -- 
Is there a protocol to adding someone from off the list to a discussion thread here? This study is fascinating and I mentioned it to a friend who co-founded Flowminder, and I think he'd love to discuss.
Lina
On Wed, Mar 2, 2016 at 12:21 PM, Sean McDonald <seanmartinmcdonald at gmail.com> wrote:

I'm excited to present some new research: "Ebola: A Big Data Disaster," published by the Center for Internet & Society (with support from the Media Democracy Fund). It's a look at the way that technology was used during the Ebola response - with a focus on Call Detail Records, the experimental nature of data modeling in humanitarian response, and how that likely violates West Africa's well-developed (but under-implemented) data laws.
My hope is that it will kick off a larger discussion about the risks (legal and operational) of digitizing humanitarian response - especially when it involves the use of large scale, sensitive data like CDRs (all anonymization and re-identification caveats apply). As practice stands, international organizations are likely putting themselves and the people they help at considerable risk, in violation of human rights law, data protection law, local regulation, and potentially commercial property law (among other theories of litigation). 
This case study focuses on Liberia, which didn't turn over CDR access - but many of the same operational considerations and laws apply in Sierra Leone and Guinea, where several mobile network operators did. 
I'd love any thoughts, connections to people working on these issues, or critical feedback. 
Best,
Sean
--
Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.




-- 

--
Lina Srivastava
--
twitter  |  linkedin |  facebook  | instagram http://www.linasrivastava.com/http://www.regardinghumanity.org/ http://www.whoisdayanicristal.com/

--
Liberationtech is public & archives are searchable on Google. Violations of list guidelines will get you moderated: https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech. Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at companys at stanford.edu.


Hi all,

Today, 4 March, ARTICLE 19 and Coding Rights are launching ‘Net of
Rights’, a short film which explores the link between internet protocols
and human rights online. The film will screen at 6pm at the Internet
Freedom Festival.


Please find the film Net of Rights here:
https://hrpc.io/wp-content/uploads/videos/netofrights.io.mp4

and the teaser here:
https://hrpc.io/wp-content/uploads/videos/netofrights.io_teaser.mp4

If the teaser doesn't show in your browser, you can also use this link:
https://vimeo.com/157722482

Here is the press release (also below):
http://is.gd/kqYjc3

and please get involved in the work at: https://hrpc.io/

It is too-often assumed that there is no link between protocols (the
standards which underpin the way the internet functions) and human
rights, but this is simply not the case, as the film argues.

The Internet aspires to be the global ‘network of networks’, providing
connectivity for all users, at all times, for any content. Connectivity
increases the capacity for individuals to exercise their rights, meaning
that the architectural design of the internet is, necessarily,
intertwined with the human rights framework.

 Promoting open, secure and reliable connectivity is essential for the
rights to privacy, expression and assembly. But how are these concepts
addressed at the protocol level? Without proper definition, the human
rights-enabling characteristics of the internet are at risk.

The role of human rights in Internet policy is slowly becoming part of
the general discourse. Former United Nations (UN) Special Rapporteur on
the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and
expression, Frank La Rue, explicitly spoke of the replationship, leading
to the approval of the landmark resolution "on the promotion, protection
and enjoyment of human rights on the Internet" at the UN Human Rights
Council, and the resolution "The right to privacy in the digital age" at
the UN General Assembly.

Mapping the relationship between human rights and internet protocols and
architectures is a new research challenge, which requires the
development of a consistent methodology, bringing human rights experts
together with the community of researchers and developers of Internet
standards and technologies. The Human Rights Protocol Research Group is
a group chartered to research how standards and protocols (the rules by
which the internet functions) can enable, strengthen, or threaten human
rights.

The rights-enabling characteristics of the Internet will be increasingly
endangered if they are not properly defined, described and protected as
such.  And, indeed, the other way around: by not protecting these
characteristics, we risk loss of functionality and connectivity in the
architecture of the internet itself.

To protect human rights online, it will be necessary to explore and map
the link between rights and protocol, ensuring the survival of a
decentralized and collaborative internet, in which freedom of expression
through unimpeded connectivity remains a central principle, and a
guiding force.

Conceived in partnership between ARTICLE 19 and Coding Rights, this film
aims to highlight the importance of addressing this issue within the
technical community and human rights advocates, but also to feed into
the work of the Human Rights Protocol Considerations research group
(HRPC) in the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF). This group is
currently mapping the relation between human rights and Internet
protocols, in order to strengthen the Internet as a human rights
enabling environment, in which freedom of expression through unimpeded
connectivity remains a central principle and guiding force.

All the best,

Niels

-- 
Niels ten Oever
Head of Digital

Article 19
www.article19.org

PGP fingerprint    8D9F C567 BEE4 A431 56C4
                  678B 08B5 A0F2 636D 68E9



From: Joonas Pekkanen <joonas at pekkanen.org>

does anyone have any tips to find information on well-working whistleblower systems in cities (or other local governments)? 
The City of Helsinki has now set up a committee (working until June) to examine how such a system should be set up. I would like to make sure the committee has the best info at hand.
Thank you in advance!
Joonas Pekkanenhttp://linkedin.com/in/pekkanenFrom: Chris Riley <mchris at mozilla.com> & Michael Brennan mailto:M.Brennan at fordfoundation.org
Applications for the Ford Foundation Technology Fellows program are now open and Ford is looking to reach qualified candidates. You can find it here: http://www.fordfoundation.org/careers
We are looking for people with a tech perspective to really help shape and build out how technology informs the work of three key thematic areas - civic engagement & governance, equitable development, and gender racial and ethnic justice. It’s an opportunity to truly influence issues at the intersection of tech and social justice. I’ve written more about why Ford is hiring technologists here: http://www.fordfoundation.org/ideas/equals-change-blog/posts/why-the-ford-foundation-wants-technologists-to-join-the-fight-for-social-justice
Thanks so much,
Michael


| 
 |  |


 
  
 
Hello,

at Hermes Center we got a good set of experience in deploying and
customizing GlobaLeaks for Public Agencies and AntiCorruption NGOs (even
if we're mostly known for uses in media-activism and investigative
journalists).

Since we've started cooperating with TI's national chapters and other
anti-corruption NGOs in 2014, we've started an improvement process of
the GlobaLeaks software to increase information quality coming into the
system, handling different submission workflows, handling multiple team
on the same platforms, integrating in existing websites in
privacy-preserving way and stuff like that.

Btw from what we've learned "on field", the procedural/organizational
part of a whistleblowing project (let's call it "the analog part") is
probably the most important.

I'd really recommend to get support from the national chapter of
Transparency International, that surely knows better also the specific
"legal" requirements that may impact the procedures and workflows for
Whistleblowing.

If we can gives some advice / support in evaluating / deploying
globaleaks in that context, let's fire an email! :-)

-- 
Fabio Pietrosanti (naif)
HERMES - Center for Transparency and Digital Human Rights
http://logioshermes.org/- https://globaleaks.org/- https://tor2web.org/-
https://ahmia.fi/

On 3/5/16 5:20 PM, Yosem Companys wrote:
> From: *Joonas Pekkanen* <joonas at pekkanen.org <mailto:joonas at pekkanen.org>>
> 
> does anyone have any tips to find information on well-working
> whistleblower systems in cities (or other local governments)? 
> 
> The City of Helsinki has now set up a committee
> <http://dev.hel.fi/paatokset/asia/hel-2016-000833/> (working until June)
> to examine how such a system should be set up. I would like to make sure
> the committee has the best info at hand.
> 
> Thank you in advance!
> 
> Joonas Pekkanen
> http://linkedin.com/in/pekkanen
> 
> 


# 9th Workshop on Hot Topics in Privacy Enhancing Technologies (HotPETs2016)

Held in conjunction with the 16th Privacy Enhancing Technologies Symposium
July 22, 2016
Darmstadt, Germany

The Workshop on Hot Topics in Privacy Enhancing Technologies (HotPETs)
fosters new ideas and spirited debates on privacy. We are calling for
engaging and informative 10-15 minute talks on hot topics in privacy
enhancing technologies (PETs), with each talk to be followed by a 5-10
minute question period. Short, written talk proposals should be sent by
May 13th, 2016, to <hotpets16 at petsymposium.org> (details below). The
nature of HotPETs' discussion-oriented format is especially suited to
works in progress and new ideas that have not yet been fully formed.

# Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

 * Anonymous communications and publishing systems
 * Censorship resistance
 * Challenges in deploying PETs
 * Cryptographic protocols with application to privacy
 * Economics of PETs
 * Genetic privacy
 * Human computer interaction with PETs
 * Impact of PETs in the wild
 * Interdisciplinary privacy
 * Legal issues surrounding PETs
 * Location privacy
 * Online surveillance
 * Privacy and identity management
 * Privacy-enhanced access control and authentication
 * Privacy in databases
 * Privacy in social networks
 * Public policy regulating the use and development of PETs
 * Usability of PETs
 * User studies of PETs

Who should submit:

We invite submissions from activists, artists, developers, journalists,
lawyers, public servants, researchers, scholars, and any others who can
give a compelling, novel talk about privacy and privacy-enhancing
technologies. PETS and HotPETS attract world-renowned experts on the
research, development, and practice of PETs. If you are excited to give
a talk to such a group, and you think they would be excited to hear it,
then you should submit. Some example talks:

 * Researcher describing recent research results or a work in progress,
especially on a novel or newly-important topic in privacy or security
 * Experiences from an activist working with PETs "on the ground"
 * Software developer describing a recent experience with a
privacy-enhancing tool they built
 * Government official discussing interactions between technology and
the development of privacy or security-related policy

What to submit:

We invite two-page talk proposals that give an overview of what you
intend to present, including any results or conclusions you intend to
share. HotPETs strives for engaging talks and focused discussions, and
so proposals should display exciting ideas that can be communicated
clearly and with brevity.

We encourage you to link to additional sources of your work (e.g.,
software, videos, websites, papers) within your proposal. The HotPETs
chairs will strive to incorporate these additional sources into the
review process, although full review of material beyond what is
contained in the submission text is not guaranteed.

A proposal must include a title and a list of authors responsible for
the work to be presented (one of whom must give the talk). It must be no
more than two pages including references. It must be submitted as a Word
or PDF document, and we recommend that proposals use either this Word
template or this LaTeX template. For detailed information on using these
templates, see the ACM SIG Proceedings templates.

HotPETs has no official proceedings, but accepted submissions will be
made available on the HotPETs website (authors may revise them after
acceptance). Authors may have the option to include talk-related
resources, such as slides or software, on the HotPETs website. With
speaker consent, recordings of HotPETs talks may be made during the
workshop and put online.

# Submission Review

The HotPETs chairs will review the submissions and make the final
decisions on acceptance. The chairs may request external input or advice
to make fully informed decisions.

The chairs will seek to accept submissions that have the potential to
create an engaging workshop for speakers and attendees. Accepted
submissions may include those that provoke interesting discussion,
provide unique insight or value to the PETs community, share new and
emerging PETs-related research, and have the potential to expand
engagement between the PETs community and PETs users.

The chairs seek submissions that are complete and concise. They should
provide a full overview of the proposed talk, including (if available)
any conclusions or findings that are to be presented.

# Deadlines:

Submission Deadline: May 13th
Submission Notification: May 20th

https://www.petsymposium.org/2016/hotpets.php


From: Rich Metson <rich at semaeopus.com>

 I'm not a particularly academic mind so apologies if this is mis-posted, or if I have missed the point, but I thought this recent article by Shoshana Zuboff was fascinating and might also be to you good folks:
 
http://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/debatten/the-digital-debate/shoshana-zuboff-secrets-of-surveillance-capitalism-14103616-p2.html?printPagedArticle=true#pageIndex_3
 
 I particularly appreciated the abstract but actionable steps 3/4 of the way through the piece, and see them a little bit like a 'How to hack Surveillance Capitalism'
 
 "We need new interventions that interrupt, outlaw, or regulate 
 1) the initial capture of behavioral surplus,
 2) the use of behavioral surplus as free raw material, 
 3) excessive and exclusive concentrations of the new means of production, 
 4) the manufacture of prediction products, 
 5) the sale of prediction products, 
 6) the use of prediction products for third-order operations of modification, influence, and control, and 
 7) the monetization of the results of these operations. 

 This is necessary for society, for people, for the future, and it is also necessary to restore the healthy evolution of capitalism itself."
 
 ...as a videogame developer I suppose I would enjoy bite-sized and actionable challenges within a larger complex system, but I figure this is probably inherent in the processes of a lot of people on this list! I hope you enjoy too.
 
 Oh, and Shoshana, if you are on here, great article!
 
 Rich.
 
 -- 
 Rich Metson - @richmetson
 Designer . Developer . Director . Co-founder
 Semaeopus Ltd. - OffGridthegame.com - @OffGridthegame 
 PGP Fingerprint: B2FF 7339 CD04 3069 6F56 BCF8 34C7 FA40 0964 BCAE  
What an oxymoron: "healthy capitalism!"

Regards | Saludos,
Andrés Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes<alps at acm.org>
On Mar 5, 2016, at 1:39 PM, Yosem Companys <companys at stanford.edu> wrote:


From: Rich Metson <rich at semaeopus.com>

 I'm not a particularly academic mind so apologies if this is mis-posted, or if I have missed the point, but I thought this recent article by Shoshana Zuboff was fascinating and might also be to you good folks:
 
http://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/debatten/the-digital-debate/shoshana-zuboff-secrets-of-surveillance-capitalism-14103616-p2.html?printPagedArticle=true#pageIndex_3
 
 I particularly appreciated the abstract but actionable steps 3/4 of the way through the piece, and see them a little bit like a 'How to hack Surveillance Capitalism'
 
 "We need new interventions that interrupt, outlaw, or regulate 
 1) the initial capture of behavioral surplus,
 2) the use of behavioral surplus as free raw material, 
 3) excessive and exclusive concentrations of the new means of production, 
 4) the manufacture of prediction products, 
 5) the sale of prediction products, 
 6) the use of prediction products for third-order operations of modification, influence, and control, and 
 7) the monetization of the results of these operations. 

 This is necessary for society, for people, for the future, and it is also necessary to restore the healthy evolution of capitalism itself."
 
 ...as a videogame developer I suppose I would enjoy bite-sized and actionable challenges within a larger complex system, but I figure this is probably inherent in the processes of a lot of people on this list! I hope you enjoy too.
 
 Oh, and Shoshana, if you are on here, great article!
 
 Rich.
 
 -- 
 Rich Metson - @richmetson
 Designer . Developer . Director . Co-founder
 Semaeopus Ltd. - OffGridthegame.com - @OffGridthegame 
 PGP Fingerprint: B2FF 7339 CD04 3069 6F56 BCF8 34C7 FA40 0964 BCAE  


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On 03/05/2016 12:04 PM, Andrés Pacheco wrote:
> What an oxymoron: "healthy capitalism!"
> 
> Regards | Saludos,
> 
> Andrés Leopoldo Pacheco Sanfuentes

As a linguist, I object to "healthy capitalism" as an "oxymoron". An
oxymoron would be "publicly-owned capitalism". But from a political
perspective, I agree "healthy capitalism" makes no sense. ;)



From: Rebecca Williams <rebecca at rebeccawilliams.us>

I hope you are having a fun #OpenDataDay so far. Here is what DC is working on right now. I can't wait to read all the recaps. 
In the spirit of gathering best practices & collaboration, I wrote up a few non-coding challenges here: Help GovEx Gather #WhatWorks on Open Data Day 2016.
If there is something you know your city is doing better than anyone else or differently than anyone else please let me know so I can feature it as a best practice in GovEx's implementation guides! 
You can tweet best practices with the #WhatWorks + #OpenDataDay, file issues or pull requests on the guides, or email me directly.


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