Thanks, Neema, for reaching out, and great to hear about your awesome work!<br><br>The activity you are describing could fall under the phenomenon of crowdsourcing for democracy, which is a fascinating, emerging field of inquiry in political and social sciences (and a part of my research agenda!), and could be realized for instance by using crowdsourcing platforms, such as IdeaScale or similar ones, which allow clear voting and commenting functions.<br>

<br>Citizens' alternative (not always alternative though!) agenda for democratic processes has been practiced e.g. in Iceland in constitution reform process: <a href="http://youtu.be/4uJOjh5QBgA">http://youtu.be/4uJOjh5QBgA</a>, and similar attempts in Egypt, Morocco, etc.<br>

<br>Let me know if you want to discuss more, and hope to see you when you are back on campus!<br><br>best,<br>Tanja Aitamurto<br>Visiting Researcher<br>Program on Liberation Technology<br>Stanford University<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">

On Sun, Sep 16, 2012 at 9:18 AM, Neema Moraveji <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:neema@stanford.edu" target="_blank">neema@stanford.edu</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Researchers, hackers, and students:<br>
<br>
There is a need in many countries, to support "extra-government<br>
elections" with web-based technology (i.e., let citizens vote fairly<br>
without government influence, extortion, etc.).  I think this is a<br>
valuable investment of time for a Libtech/HCI/CS/ICTD research<br>
project.<br>
<br>
Imagine a site that allowed citizens to vote, could show the outside<br>
world and governments themselves (which often have unreliable means of<br>
voting/counting/etc.) how the citizens really feel about different<br>
candidates - in a non-biased way.<br>
<br>
The research issues to solve: authentication, visualization,<br>
accountability, and perhaps even access.  Using common computer<br>
components (keyboard, webcam, etc.) can such a system be delivered to<br>
at least approximate the real sentiment of the people? At least to the<br>
outside world?<br>
<br>
Does such a system already exist?<br>
<br>
I am in Iran right now connecting with young people and intellectuals.<br>
I can't speak for other countries but Iran will have important<br>
elections in 9 months.  If even a prototype of such a system exists,<br>
it could gain wide use here and be used by news agencies around the<br>
world to broadcast the difference between govt and extra-govt voting<br>
results.<br>
<br>
<br>
All the best,<br>
<br>
Neema Moraveji, Ph.D.<br>
Director<br>
Calming Technology Lab<br>
Media-X<br>
Stanford University<br>
<a href="http://moraveji.org" target="_blank">moraveji.org</a>, <a href="http://calmingtech.stanford.edu" target="_blank">calmingtech.stanford.edu</a><br>
@moraveji, @calmingtech<br>
--<br>
Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password at: <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech" target="_blank">https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br><div><a href="http://www.tanjaaitamurto.com" target="_blank">www.tanjaaitamurto.com</a></div><div><br></div><div>Studying the Open X at Stanford: crowdsourcing, crowdfunding, open innovation, open data.</div>

<div><br></div><br>