<p dir="ltr">It's not true that all widely used crypto implementations are open.</p>
<p dir="ltr">Even open source projects themselves depend on closed implementations.</p>
<p dir="ltr">For example, Linux, OpenSSL, GnuTLS, libgcrypt, and dm-crypt may all use AESNI on x86, usually by default [1]. Linux now also uses a closed RdRand [2] RNG if available.</p>
<p dir="ltr">The crypto implementation is secret. Even if you had the design, the tools to even make sense of it are themselves proprietary and built on layers of proprietary dependencies.</p>
<p dir="ltr">Here's some relevant links:<br>
[1] <a href="http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/advanced-encryption-standard--aes-/aes-ni-ecosystem-update.html">http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/advanced-encryption-standard--aes-/aes-ni-ecosystem-update.html</a></p>

<p dir="ltr">[2] <a href="http://m.spectrum.ieee.org/computing/hardware/behind-intels-new-randomnumber-generator/0">http://m.spectrum.ieee.org/computing/hardware/behind-intels-new-randomnumber-generator/0</a></p>
<p dir="ltr">On Jul 11, 2013 3:32 AM, "danimoth" <<a href="mailto:danimoth@cryptolab.net">danimoth@cryptolab.net</a>> wrote:<br>
> If yes, ask yourself why *crypto design schemes and implementations are<br>
> open and widely known, and only keys are secret.<br>
</p>