<div dir="ltr">We call this "The trust and safety departments at most major companies."<div><br></div><div style>It already exists. You're getting wrapped up in a technical implementation which would normally be handled by large teams. The level of integration you describe is more than just a simplistic database table. </div>
<div style><br></div><div style>Additionally, your order of operations doesn't match the DMCA workflow that is required by law. Have a look at this helpful infographic and rethink the flow..</div><div style><br></div>
<div style><a href="http://www.mediabistro.com/appnewser/files/2012/02/infographic-dmca-process1.png">http://www.mediabistro.com/appnewser/files/2012/02/infographic-dmca-process1.png</a><br></div><div style><br></div><div style>
-j</div><div style><br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jul 16, 2013 at 12:47 PM,  <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:riptidetempora@tormail.org" target="_blank">riptidetempora@tormail.org</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hello, I'm @RiptideTempora on Twitter. My background is in web<br>
development. The other day I postulated a system for handling DMCA<br>
takedown notices on an individual website level that would tip the scales<br>
in favor of the users (whom are, as far as I can tell, currently shafted<br>
by the current iterations of U.S. legislation).<br>
<br>
The full text can be found here: <a href="http://pastebin.com/0uG85vna" target="_blank">http://pastebin.com/0uG85vna</a><br>
<br>
The process would go something like this:<br>
<br>
    1. Someone sends a DMCA Takedown Notice<br>
    2. A new database entry in `dmca_takedowns` is created with the entire<br>
email<br>
       (with full headers)<br>
    3. All infringing material are linked in the database to that takedown<br>
notice<br>
       which adds a message saying "A DMCA Takedown notice has been filed<br>
for this<br>
       [article/video/song/whatever]."<br>
    4. All "authors" of the content are notified of the DMCA request by<br>
internal<br>
       message and by email of the DMCA Takedown Notice, which will<br>
include the<br>
       phone numbers and email addresses for ACLU, NLG, et al. should they<br>
wish to<br>
       file a counter-notice (which will also be public if sent to us, by<br>
adding<br>
       an entry to `dmca_counternotice` which is linked to the notice ID)<br>
    5. A public index of pending (and resolved) DMCA Takedown Notices will<br>
be main-<br>
       tained which include the full emails and all affected content<br>
    6. The maximum amount of time legally permitted (designated $lead)<br>
will elapse<br>
       to allow the original authors ample time to organize a counter-notice<br>
    7. If no counter-notice is filed after $lead we will either amend or<br>
disable the<br>
       public availability of the content. The `dmca_takedown` entry will<br>
be marked<br>
       as "Taken Down"<br>
    8. If a counter-notice is filed, we will disable the content after<br>
$lead days<br>
       and mark the `dmca_takedown` entry as "Counter-notice filed" to<br>
comply with<br>
       [my understanding of the law], then wait 14 days for the filer to<br>
respond to<br>
       file a lawsuit (during which time we will be in contact with the<br>
authors who<br>
       filed counter-notice).<br>
    9. If after 14 days no lawsuit was filed, the takedown notice will be<br>
marked as<br>
       "14 days expired without lawsuit" and the content will remain<br>
visible (but<br>
       still be indexed on a separate page for "failed" DMCA Takedowns)<br>
    10. If we receive notification that a lawsuit has been filed, we<br>
disable access<br>
        to the material and mark it as "Lawsuit Pending"<br>
<br>
      In total, I anticipate 3 pages consisting of 2 lists, 2 list, and 1<br>
list<br>
      respectively:<br>
         1. The front page will list:<br>
            A. New DMCA Takedown Notices<br>
            B. Counter-notice Filed<br>
         2. There will be a "taken down" page for the sake of transparency<br>
            A. Successful takedowns<br>
            B. Content disabled, pending the outcome of a lawsuit<br>
         3. There will be a "failed" page that lists unsuccessful takedown<br>
            requests for the sake of transparency<br>
<br>
I'd like to know if such a system would be legally viable or if it would<br>
incur additional risks for a website that implemented such a system; and<br>
further, what adjustments could be made to make this design more robust<br>
under the current legal and political climates around copyright law?<br>
<br>
Thank you for your time,<br>
~RT<br>
<br>
--<br>
Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at <a href="mailto:companys@stanford.edu">companys@stanford.edu</a> or changing your settings at <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech" target="_blank">https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech</a><br>

</blockquote></div><br></div>