<div class="gmail_quote">Fabio Pietrosanti (naif) <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:lists@infosecurity.ch" target="_blank">lists@infosecurity.ch</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Hi all,<br>
<br>
i've been thinking about the topic of metadata cleanup of files from an implementation point of view.<br></blockquote><div><br>  Media metadata is incredibly fascinating :D  Obscuracam does a really great job of cleaning up jpegs, but doesn't cover the other random picture types that people tend to have around.<br>
<br>  I've been mulling around the idea of a bash/python/etc script that could be run an an entire folder of random stuff and remove all the metadata.  This is one of those things that seems really easy conceptually, but has really stumped me in practice.  There's so many different types of "metadata" that it's tricky to plot out a work plan to do it.  In any given folder there might be Microsoft Word docs (with full revision history that can reveal individuals' full names), photos (with personal exif/gps data), html files (marked with the source of the file)....<br>
<br>  PDFs are an interesting situation, because they have metadata, and the files within have metadata, and even embedded fonts can have metadata that could reveal the source of the document.  This should still be the case when exporting/converting from ODF/DOC to PDF (unless everything goes through some type of cleaning process beforehand, before the original document were created).  Depending on the document, this could be a good thing.  It might be possible to prove that the origin of Evidence X was from Corrupt CEO Y using metadata.  By the same token, it's just as likely to prove that Leak A came from Intel Analyst B.  Even the NSA's weirded out about it [1].<br>
<br>best,<br>Griffin<br><br>[1] <a href="http://www.nsa.gov/ia/_files/app/pdf_risks.pdf">http://www.nsa.gov/ia/_files/app/pdf_risks.pdf</a><br clear="all"></div></div><br>-- <br>Just another hacker in the City of Spies.<br>
<br>My posts, while frequently amusing, are not representative of the thoughts of my employer.