<div dir="ltr">On Wed, Jul 17, 2013 at 1:54 PM, Collin Anderson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:collin@averysmallbird.com" target="_blank">collin@averysmallbird.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Wait, forgive me Libtech for amusing myself at the cost of your collective inboxes but, is it just me or is the security page on what purports to be a security tool empty? <a href="https://unsene.com/security.html" target="_blank">https://unsene.com/security.html</a></div>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>"Military-grade encryption", huh? That phrase always makes my spider sense tingle.<div><br></div><div>From their descriptions:<br><div><br></div><div><div><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 40px;border:none;padding:0px">
<div>• AES – a symmetric key that is considered to be very strong.  We’re using the 256 bit version for the free version of our site, which is the maximum bit key size for this algorithm.  We believe this is broken by the NSA and we believe it’s either real time or near real time decrypt-able.</div>
<div><br></div><div>• XAES – a more secure and advanced version of AES, ours goes up to 4096 bits, which is über-strong.  Unlikely to be broken as this has been customized from standard code libraries that aren’t widely known.</div>
</blockquote></div><br>Crypto mistake #1: "Our algorithm is secure because nobody knows how it works." <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerckhoffs's_principle">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerckhoffs's_principle</a><div>
<div><br></div><div>Cool project, but I'm highly doubtful it'll be secure. They're making some fundamental mistakes, like confusing RSA X-bits with AES X-bits, and assuming their stuff won't be broken if they don't tell anyone how it works.</div>
</div></div></div></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class=""><div class="h5">
<div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 17, 2013 at 1:50 PM, Collin Anderson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:collin@averysmallbird.com" target="_blank">collin@averysmallbird.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>


<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>







<p>> <span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">So, AES-128 is what they're using?</span></p></div><p><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">Mo' money, mo' key length.</span></p>



<blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 40px;border:none;padding:0px"><p><b><i>What’s the difference between the free version and the premium version?</i></b></p><p><i>The free version provides 256-bit AES encryption and 2GB of free encrypted storage and allows sharing of files of up to 50MB. The premium version provides up to 1048-bit AES encryption and 50GB of encrypted storage and allows sharing of files of up to 40GB. Also, the key in the free version is pre-generated and stored on our servers, while with the premium version the user has the option to generate his own key and store it locally for even greater security.  Keep in mind there is no “password recovery”, so you definitely won’t want to forget your passphrase!</i></p>



</blockquote>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div>On Wed, Jul 17, 2013 at 1:38 PM,  <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:liberationtech@lewman.us" target="_blank">liberationtech@lewman.us</a>></span> wrote:<br>



</div><div><div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 10:18:44 -0700<br>
Collin Sullivan <<a href="mailto:collins@benetech.org" target="_blank">collins@benetech.org</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> <a href="http://unsene.com/blog/2013/06/15/is-most-encryption-broken/" target="_blank">http://unsene.com/blog/2013/06/15/is-most-encryption-broken/</a><br>
<br>
....haystack called and wants its media pitch back....<br>
<br>
They say AES is broken and yet, "Military-grade security protects your<br>
important private messages, photos and videos, everywhere. It's so<br>
strong that we can't export it to Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and North Korea."<br>
<br>
So, AES-128 is what they're using? I believe you can only export 64-bit<br>
or less keys without a license.<br>
<br>
This entire thing is dripping in snakeoil.<br>
<span><font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
Andrew<br>
<a href="http://tpo.is/contact" target="_blank">http://tpo.is/contact</a><br>
pgp 0x6B4D6475<br>
</font></span><div><div>--<br>
Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at <a href="mailto:companys@stanford.edu" target="_blank">companys@stanford.edu</a> or changing your settings at <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech" target="_blank">https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech</a><br>




</div></div></blockquote></div></div></div><br><br clear="all"><div><div><br></div>-- <br><b>Collin David Anderson</b><div><a href="http://averysmallbird.com" target="_blank">averysmallbird.com</a> | @cda | Washington, D.C.</div>



</div></div>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><b>Collin David Anderson</b><div><a href="http://averysmallbird.com" target="_blank">averysmallbird.com</a> | @cda | Washington, D.C.</div>
</div>
</div></div><br>--<br>
Too many emails? Unsubscribe, change to digest, or change password by emailing moderator at <a href="mailto:companys@stanford.edu">companys@stanford.edu</a> or changing your settings at <a href="https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech" target="_blank">https://mailman.stanford.edu/mailman/listinfo/liberationtech</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div></div>