<div dir="ltr">To <span class=""><span name="boyska" class="">boyska,</span></span><div><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">
<br>
</div>but what if Gmail provides a fake key for B? Why should you<br>
automatically trust that key?<br>
<br>
Also, I miss the point of signatures: A signs B's key, but noone cares<br>
about that signature in that scheme. Am I missing something?<br></blockquote><div> </div><div>"At first time, B's public key will be downloaded from Google and signed by A.". "Any subsequent times, A also verifies the authenticity of B's key".  <br>

</div><div>So Google can provide a fake key only at the first time. I said "<span>For advanced users, Google can present the option to manually verify the public key for the first email". Google cannot MITM any subsequent communications because fake key of B is not signed by A and will be detected.<br>

</span><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
I think that this scheme relies on trust on your email provider and on<br>
https not being MITM-ed, which I think is not common between people that<br>
want to use PGP.<br></blockquote><div>I'm targeting the common people(email provider to the common people),not the existing PGP users.<br>Now, only people who are technical savvy can make the conscious decision to use PGP. My design is totally transparent to the users and can greatly boost the privacy of common communications without users even knowing what PGP is. Those high profile users can keep using the desktop version.   <br>

</div></div></div></div></div>