<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small">Hi,</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small">Thank you for the clarification.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small">PhiHo</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small"><br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, May 14, 2015 at 4:29 AM, Nicholas Bastin <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:nick.bastin@gmail.com" target="_blank">nick.bastin@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><span class="">On Wed, May 13, 2015 at 3:08 PM, Phiho Hoang <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:hohoangphi@gmail.com" target="_blank">hohoangphi@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-size:small">I am not as much concerned with the through put as with how to handle the massive number of hosts, sub-nets and datapaths in the emulation using Mininet.<br></div><div style="font-size:small"></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>If you use mininet hosts this gets more interesting - you are of course eating up a different set of system resources and have to consider that.  Otherwise caring about things like subnets doesn't matter because datapath interfaces obviously don't have that kind of metadata.</div><span class=""><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-size:small">(I plan to use dozens of cheap CHIP, the Raspberry Pi Killer ;-)</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>We are getting some this summer to do some kernel hacking on the A13 for SDN-ish purposes, but I'm not sure how well they'll work for you here - clustering them would involve using the wifi interface (as there's no wired ethernet), and "dozens" in any close proximity are likely to be an RF nightmare.  The raspberry pi 2 is already a pretty great small-scale solution for this problem (although still only 100Mbit ethernet).</div><span class=""><div> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-size:small"></div><div style="font-size:small">Did you find any need for DHCP, DNS, routers... when you work with Mininet at a massive scale across multiple servers so that all Mininet hosts in the emulation can communicate with one another conveniently?</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>We don't use mininet "hosts" in the emulation (we use other distributed hardware connected to the emulation environment to provide the end hosts, either as VMs, containers, or hardware generators, depending on the test). </div><div><br></div><div>--</div><div>Nick</div></div></div></div>
</blockquote></div><br></div>